The Book Show

Tuesdays, 3pm - 3:30pm; Thursdays, 8:30pm - 9pm

Each week on The Book Show, host Joe Donahue interviews authors about their books, their lives and their craft. It is a celebration of both reading and writers. 

As the son of a librarian, Joe has been part of the book world since childhood. His first job was as a library assistant, during college he was a clerk at an independent book store and for the past 25 years he has been interviewing authors about their books on the radio.

He is also the host of The Roundtable on WAMC Northeast Public Radio, a 3-hour general interest talk show. Notable authors he has interviewed include: Kurt Vonnegut, John Irving, John Updike, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Arthur Miller, Stephen King, Amy Tan, Anne Rice, Philip Roth, E.L Doctorow, Richard Russo, David Sedaris and Maya Angelou. 

Joe  has won several awards for his interviews, including honors from the Associated Press, the Edward R. Murrow Awards, the New York State Association of Broadcasters, The Headliners, The National Press Club and the Scripps-Howard Foundation. 

E-mail The Book Show.

Twitter: @The_Book_Show

  Gail Godwin takes a look at the publishing industry over the last fifty years, a time of great upheaval and ingenuity, in her new memoir, Publishing.

Godwin is a three-time National Book Award finalist and is the bestselling author of fourteen novels including Flora, Evensong, and The Good Husband.

  Novelist Lauren Oliver has made her mark in Young Adult literature with such book as Before I Fall, Panic and the Delirium Trilogy. Oliver is making her first foray into Adult fiction with Rooms, a tale of two ghosts trapped in the walls of an old house and the family whose home and lives overlap with their own.

    Bob Mankoff is the cartoon editor of The New Yorker magazine and he has the best job in the world. At least, that’s what everyone tells him.

In his new memoir, How About Never – Is Never Good For You? My Life in Cartoons, Mankoff illustrates that in fact he has two amazing jobs. Editor and is also one of the magazine foremost cartoonists himself.

    Garrison Keillor is a storyteller, humorist, essayist, newspaper columnist, screenwriter, poet and broadcaster.

Now a single volume brings together the full range of his work: essays, stories, excerpts from novels and newspaper columns. 

  Charles M. Blow has been a columnist at the New York Times since 2008. He is known for penning intensely personal pieces and now tells his extraordinary life story in his memoir, Fire Shut Up in My Bones.

The book explores racial, spiritual and sexual complexities and is Blow’s coming of age story of psychic survival and self invention.

  Historian Jill Lepore was researching an article for The New Yorker on the history of Planned Parenthood and a paper on the history of evidence when she discovered that both were connected to comic book hero - Wonder Woman. That led to her new book: The Secret History of Wonder Woman.

  Carl Hiaasen writes a regular column for the Miami Herald and is the author of many bestselling novels including Star Island and Bad Monkey for adults and Hoot, Chomp, Scat, and Flush for young readers. His latest, Skink - No Surrender is his first novel for teens.

    With The Blazing World, internationally best¬selling author Siri Hustvedt returns to the New York art world telling the provocative story of the artist Harriet Burden.

After years of watching her work ignored or dismissed by critics, Burden conducts an experiment she calls Maskings: she presents her own art behind three male masks, concealing her female identity.

  Dancer, choreographer, and director Bill T. Jones reflects on his art and life in his new book: Story/Time. The book is filled with telling vignettes--about Jones's childhood as part of a large, poor, Southern family that migrated to upstate New York; about his struggles to find a place for himself in a white-dominated dance world; and about his encounters with notable artists and musicians.

    Diane Ackerman is the author of the books: One Hundred Names for Love, A Natural History of the Senses, and The Zookeeper's Wife. In her latest book, The Human Age, she offers some optimism for our planet and explores the ways people are shaping the modern world, and argues for a new understanding of our relationship with the environment and our own bodies.

  

  The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald is a revered classic and a rite of passage in the reading lives of millions. In her new book, So We Read On, Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan offers a fresh perspective on what makes Gatsby great – and utterly unusual.

  Chrysler Szarlan’s debut novel, The Hawley Book of the Dead, introduces us to Revelation Dyer. Together, she and her husband Jeremy have three daughters, a beautiful home, and a world-famous Las Vegas magic act.

But Reve has many secrets, secrets that have not only shaped her past but now threaten her family.

    In what is being called by critics, the greatest novel of his career, Martin Amis’ latest, The Zone of Interest, provides a searing portrait of life – and, shockingly, love – in a concentration camp.

In the novel, the stories of the commander of the camp, the nephew of Hitler’s secretary, and a prisoner at the camp, all converge.

    In her followup to the best-selling Loving Frank, Nancy Horan recounts the improbably love affair between Scottish author, Robert Louis Stevenson and his American wife, Fanny Osbourne.

In The Wide and Starry Sky, Horan invites us to explore The Stevensons unusual relationship and the ways they changed the literary and artistic landscape around them.

  Based on one of the great unsolved murders in mob history, and the rise-and-fall of a real-life hero, The Big Crowd tells the sweeping story of Charlie O’Kane. He is the American dream come to life, a poor Irish immigrant who worked his way up from beat cop to mayor of New York at the city’s dazzling, post-war zenith. Famous, powerful, and married to a glamorous fashion model, he is looked up to by millions, including his younger brother, Tom. So when Charlie is accused of abetting a shocking mob murder, Tom sets out to clear his brother’s name while hiding a secret of his own.

Kevin Baker is a novelist, historian, and journalist.

    Walter Mosley is the author of more than 43 books, most notably 13 Easy Rawlins mysteries.

His latest, Rose Gold, continues Mosley’s ongoing and unique achievement in combining the mystery/PI genre with a rich social history of post war Los Angeles.

  In 1981 Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Alison Lurie published The Language of Clothes, a meditation on costume and fashion as an expression of history, social status and individual psychology. Amusing, enlightening and full of literary allusion, the book was highly praised and widely anthologized.

Now Lurie has returned with a companion book, The Language of Houses, a lucid, provocative and entertaining look at how the architecture of buildings and the spaces within them both reflect and affect the people who inhabit them.

    Joe Gannon is a writer and spoken word artist. He was also a freelance journalist during the Sandinista Revolution, writing for the Christian Science Monitor and the San Francisco Examiner.

In his new novel, Night of the Jaguar, he takes readers to the land of Nicaragua in the mid-eighties, a place recovering from one conflict and descending into another.

      Simon Winchester, The New York Times bestselling author of Atlanticand The Professor and the Madman delivers his first book about America.

The Men Who United the States is a fascinating history that illuminates the men who toiled to discover, connect, and bond the citizenry and geography of The United States of America.

 

   On this week’s Book Show we’ll meet the two recipients of this year’s Maurice Sendak Fellowship - established as a residency program for artists who tell stories with illustration.

Harry Bliss is a New Yorker cartoonist and cover artist for the magazine. Nora Krug is the illustrator of the children’s book, My Cold Went on Vacation.

  Lydia Davis is renowned in literary circles for perfecting the craft of the “extremely short short story.” She is the winner of the 2013 Man Booker International Prize, one of world literature’s most prestigious prizes.

Her latest collection is can’t and won’t - stories.

    Bob Berman is considered one of America's top astronomy writers. He is currently a columnist for Astronomy and the science editor of The Old Farmer's Almanac.

In his latest book, Zoom: How Everything Moves, From Atoms and Galaxies to Blizzards and Bees, Berman explores how motion shapes every aspect of the universe. 

  James Howard Kunstler is a prominent social critic drawing attention through his writing and speaking to the global oil crisis, climate change, and other converging catastrophes of the twenty-first century.

His latest novel is A History of the Future – the third installment of his World Made By Hand series.

    For years, there were rumors that filmmaker Henry Jaglom had taped hours of his conversations with Orson Welles but that the tapes had been lost. They weren't.

Now the transcripts have been released in a new book, edited and introduced by Peter Biskind. The new book is My Lunches with Orson: Conversations between Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles.

    At twenty-three, after leaving graduate school to pursue her dreams of becoming a poet, Joanna Rakoff moved to New York City and took a job as assistant to the storied literary agent for J. D. Salinger. She was tasked with answering Salinger’s voluminous fan mail.

Her memoir of that time is called: My Salinger Year.

  Set on a small, fictional island off the coast of Maine, Alexi Zentner's second novel, The Lobster Kings, is a nod to Shakespeare’s King Lear.

It introduces a fiery and unforgettable heroine, Cordelia Kings. The Lobster Kings is the story of Cordelia’s struggle to maintain her island’s way of life.

    Owen King’s new novel, Double Feature, is about a young man coming to terms with his life in the process and aftermath of making his first film.

Owen King joins us to talk about his novel, writing in the shadow of his father, Stephen King and the knack of being moving AND funny.

    Joseph Ellis is the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Founding Brothers. His portrait of Thomas Jefferson, American Sphinx, won the National Book Award.

His new book, Revolutionary Summer, tells an old story in a new way about the summer months of 1776 and how they witnessed the most consequential events in the story of our country’s founding.

    Francine Prose's new novel is about a cross-dressing French racecar driver who collaborates with the Nazis and is recounted by various alternating voices.

Prose has written more than a dozen novels dating back to 1973 to her latest opus, Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932.

  Publishers Weekly says Kelly Braffet’s new novel, Save Yourself, is “Captivating and realistically creepy,” adding that “she uses graceful prose, astute dialog, and vivid characters to carry the plot to an unexpected and believable finale.”

The story is a layered tale of a group of characters each seeking their own warped version of peace.

Pages