The Book Show

Tuesdays, 3pm - 3:30pm; Thursdays, 8:30pm - 9pm

Each week on The Book Show, host Joe Donahue interviews authors about their books, their lives and their craft. It is a celebration of both reading and writers. 

As the son of a librarian, Joe has been part of the book world since childhood. His first job was as a library assistant, during college he was a clerk at an independent book store and for the past 25 years he has been interviewing authors about their books on the radio.

He is also the host of The Roundtable on WAMC Northeast Public Radio, a 3-hour general interest talk show. Notable authors he has interviewed include: Kurt Vonnegut, John Irving, John Updike, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Arthur Miller, Stephen King, Amy Tan, Anne Rice, Philip Roth, E.L Doctorow, Richard Russo, David Sedaris and Maya Angelou. 

Joe  has won several awards for his interviews, including honors from the Associated Press, the Edward R. Murrow Awards, the New York State Association of Broadcasters, The Headliners, The National Press Club and the Scripps-Howard Foundation. 

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  Novelist Lauren Oliver has made her mark in Young Adult literature with such book as Before I Fall, Panic and the Delirium Trilogy. Oliver is making her first foray into Adult fiction with Rooms, a tale of two ghosts trapped in the walls of an old house and the family whose home and lives overlap with their own.

    Bob Mankoff is the cartoon editor of The New Yorker magazine and he has the best job in the world. At least, that’s what everyone tells him.

In his new memoir, How About Never – Is Never Good For You? My Life in Cartoons, Mankoff illustrates that in fact he has two amazing jobs. Editor and is also one of the magazine foremost cartoonists himself.

    Garrison Keillor is a storyteller, humorist, essayist, newspaper columnist, screenwriter, poet and broadcaster.

Now a single volume brings together the full range of his work: essays, stories, excerpts from novels and newspaper columns. 

  Charles M. Blow has been a columnist at the New York Times since 2008. He is known for penning intensely personal pieces and now tells his extraordinary life story in his memoir, Fire Shut Up in My Bones.

The book explores racial, spiritual and sexual complexities and is Blow’s coming of age story of psychic survival and self invention.

  Historian Jill Lepore was researching an article for The New Yorker on the history of Planned Parenthood and a paper on the history of evidence when she discovered that both were connected to comic book hero - Wonder Woman. That led to her new book: The Secret History of Wonder Woman.

  Carl Hiaasen writes a regular column for the Miami Herald and is the author of many bestselling novels including Star Island and Bad Monkey for adults and Hoot, Chomp, Scat, and Flush for young readers. His latest, Skink - No Surrender is his first novel for teens.

    With The Blazing World, internationally best¬selling author Siri Hustvedt returns to the New York art world telling the provocative story of the artist Harriet Burden.

After years of watching her work ignored or dismissed by critics, Burden conducts an experiment she calls Maskings: she presents her own art behind three male masks, concealing her female identity.

  Dancer, choreographer, and director Bill T. Jones reflects on his art and life in his new book: Story/Time. The book is filled with telling vignettes--about Jones's childhood as part of a large, poor, Southern family that migrated to upstate New York; about his struggles to find a place for himself in a white-dominated dance world; and about his encounters with notable artists and musicians.

    Diane Ackerman is the author of the books: One Hundred Names for Love, A Natural History of the Senses, and The Zookeeper's Wife. In her latest book, The Human Age, she offers some optimism for our planet and explores the ways people are shaping the modern world, and argues for a new understanding of our relationship with the environment and our own bodies.

  

  The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald is a revered classic and a rite of passage in the reading lives of millions. In her new book, So We Read On, Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan offers a fresh perspective on what makes Gatsby great – and utterly unusual.

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