The Book Show

Tuesdays, 3pm - 3:30pm; Thursdays, 8:30pm - 9pm

Each week on The Book Show, host Joe Donahue interviews authors about their books, their lives and their craft. It is a celebration of both reading and writers. 

As the son of a librarian, Joe has been part of the book world since childhood. His first job was as a library assistant, during college he was a clerk at an independent book store and for the past 25 years he has been interviewing authors about their books on the radio.

He is also the host of The Roundtable on WAMC Northeast Public Radio, a 3-hour general interest talk show. Notable authors he has interviewed include: Kurt Vonnegut, John Irving, John Updike, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Arthur Miller, Stephen King, Amy Tan, Anne Rice, Philip Roth, E.L Doctorow, Richard Russo, David Sedaris and Maya Angelou. 

Joe  has won several awards for his interviews, including honors from the Associated Press, the Edward R. Murrow Awards, the New York State Association of Broadcasters, The Headliners, The National Press Club and the Scripps-Howard Foundation. 

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Twitter: @The_Book_Show

  In 2008, Brian Selznick’s groundbreaking book The Invention of Hugo Cabret was awarded the Caldecott Medal. It was nominated for a National Book Award and was the basis for Martin Scorsese's Oscar winning film Hugo.

His follow up illustrated novel, Wonderstruck, debuted at #1 on the New York Times bestseller list. His newest illustrated novel is The Marvels where two seemingly unrelated stories - one in words, the other in pictures - come together. 

  Coming up on this week’s Book Show - Joe Donahue speaks with Pulitzer Prize–winning architectural critic Paul Goldberger about the life and work of the most famous architect of our time Frank Gehry.

Goldberger's book is Building Art: The Life and Work of Frank Gehry.

  Robert Goolrick’s most recent novel, The Fall of Princes, is set in 1980’s New York City, a time when Wall Street ruled, drugs were in constant supply, and jockeying for power was the name of the game. We meet Rooney, who tells the story of how he and a group of other young Princes made it to the top and then, one by one, took a fall.

  Alex Kershaw is an acclaimed WWII and best-selling historian.

His latest book - Avenue of Spies: A True Story of Terror, Espionage, and One American Family’s Heroic Resistance in Nazi-Occupied Paris - recounts the story of one family’s heroic efforts to defeat the evil in their midst.

  In her new story collection, Almost Famous Women, writer Megan Mayhew Bergman takes us into the lives of independent, inventive women at the margins of history.

Bergman has written fictionalized accounts of real-life, risk-taking women who have largely been forgotten.

  Tony winner Mary Louise Wilson -- forever dubbed "the best thing in it" in review after review – has written a memoir about her life in the theatre, movies and television. My First Hundred Years in Show Business tells Wilson’s story through the eight-year journey of turning a memoir of Vogue editor Diana Vreeland into the career-peak triumph Full Gallop, the show that made Wilson a star in her 60s.

Mary Louise Wilson's numerous award-winning roles include Vera Joseph in 4000 Miles at Lincoln Center, Big Edie in Grey Gardens (Tony Award), Fraulein Schneider in Cabaret (Tony nomination), Queen Elizabeth in The Beard of Avon (Drama Desk nomination) and Diana Vreeland in Full Gallop (Drama Desk Award). Her writing has appeared in The New Yorker and The New York Times, and she teaches acting at Tulane University. She is fresh from finishing a run on stage in the hit revival of On The Twentieth Century.

This Book Show was recorded at The Morton Memorial Library in Rhinecliff, NY, presented by Oblong Books and Music.

  Dennis Mahoney’s new novel, Bell Weather, is a mystery-adventure about a young woman confronting dangers in a re-imagined, fantastical 18th century. Consider it a big, old-fashioned suspense story set in a strangely familiar world.

Mahoney is also the author of Fellow Mortals, a Booklist Top 10 debut in 2013.

  Erik Larson has made a career of bringing half-remembered history to vivid, vibrant life. He has done so in his best-sellers: The Devil in the White City, Thunderstruck, In the Garden of Beasts, and Isaac’s Storm.

Widely acclaimed as the master of page-turning non-fiction sagas, he now brings another past event alive – this time, the last crossing of the Lusitania.

  David Gates was anointed by New York magazine as “a true heir to both Raymond Carver and John Cheever.”

He now has a new collection of stories and a novella. A Hand Reached Down to Guide Me includes eleven stories and the novella, Banishment. The collection is his first in 15-years.

  Two-time Pulitzer winner, New York Times-bestselling author, and master historian David McCullough brings to life two of the most iconic figures in American history in his new book, The Wright Brothers.

Regarded by many in their times as mere “bicycle mechanics,” Wilbur and Orville Wright were in reality self-taught geniuses of truly exceptional capacity of mind, pioneering scientific explorers, and the men who taught the world how to fly.

  Two-time Pulitzer winner, New York Times-bestselling author, and master historian David McCullough brings to life two of the most iconic figures in American history in his new book, The Wright Brothers.

Regarded by many in their times as mere “bicycle mechanics,” Wilbur and Orville Wright were in reality self-taught geniuses of truly exceptional capacity of mind, pioneering scientific explorers, and the men who taught the world how to fly.

David McCullough won Pulitzers for his biographies, Truman and John Adams. He is the recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian award.

This is an “Off the Shelf” edition of the Book Show in partnership with Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga Springs, NY and recorded before a live audience.

  Paula Hawkins’ debut novel, The Girl on the Train has already received rave reviews and has topped the New York Times Bestsellers list.

It tells the story of Rachel Watson, a commuter who is obsessed with a "perfect" couple she sees from the train that just happens to live a few houses away from her ex-husband. When the wife of the couple goes missing, Rachel gets involved.

  Norman Lear is a legendary broadcast pioneer, known for creating some of the most acclaimed and top-rated television series of all time. They include: All in the Family, Good Times, The Jeffersons, Maude, Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman, One Day at a Time, and Sanford & Son. He has just written a memoir called, Even This I Get To Experience.

  T. C. Boyle has been called by the New York Times - "one of the most inventive and verbally exuberant writers of his generation." Boyle is the bestselling author of fourteen novels and nine short story collections.

His newest book, The Harder They Come, explores anti-authoritarianism and the bloodshed that can accompany it.

Felix Clay / http://www.theguardian.com/

  British mystery and crime writer, Ruth Rendell, one of the most prolific authors in the genre with more than 60 novels, died at the age of 85 on May 2nd following a stroke in January.

We remember her, and her popular protagonist Chief Inspector Wexford, on this week’s Book Show.

  Frankie Bailey is a Professor of Criminal Justice, she’s also the author of mysteries as well as non-fiction titles that explore the intersections of crime, history, and popular culture.

In her new novel, What the Fly Saw, she looks at the real world of police work and criminal law and speculates on how they might change in the near future.

    Often called the dean of writers about the American West, Ivan Doig is the author of such national bestsellers as The Whistling Season and The Bartender's Tale.

In his latest novel, Sweet Thunder, he reprises his beloved character, Morrie Morgan, to take on the power of the press in an era of intense corporate greed and social unrest.

  Dennis Lehane is the author of twelve novels including the best-selling Mystic River, Gone, Baby, Gone, and Shutter Island. His latest is World Gone By where Lehane continues the epic story of Joe Coughlin who made his debut in The Given Day and continued in Live by Night.

  In a remarkable 50 year literary career, Joyce Carol Oates has given readers incisive explorations of violence, race, class, sex, and gender in America.

Her new novel, The Sacrifice, examines the confluence of political, social, and moral complexities that fuel a community’s reaction to an alleged crime against a young black girl.

  Peter Carey is a two-time winner of the Man Booker Prize - and he's one of only three authors to have won Prize twice. Carey’s newest novel is Amnesia, a cyber-terrorism political thriller that explores Australia’s history and politics, and its quasi-colonial relationship with the United States, during three different periods of recent history: the 1940s, the 1970s, and the present-day era of cybersecurity, hackers, and WikiLeaks.

    Chilean writer, Isabel Allende, has written her first murder-mystery.

Ripper takes place in San Francisco and centers on Amanda, a teen sleuth hooked on crime novels and online games. When a rash of killings strikes the city and her mother disappears, she takes it upon herself to investigate.

    More than 20 years after his debut as a fiction writer, Booker Prize winning author, Roddy Doyle, returns to the man who started it all: Jimmy Rabbit.

His new novel, The Guts, is a follow up to his first novel, The Commitments – which opened this past October as a musical on London’s West End. 

  In novelist Stewart O' Nan’s latest novel, West of Sunset, he imagines F. Scott Fitzgerald's final years, which he spent in Hollywood. He is living in an apartment, in poor health, struggling with alcoholism, and is increasingly despondent over his declining literary reputation.

  Gail Godwin takes a look at the publishing industry over the last fifty years, a time of great upheaval and ingenuity, in her new memoir, Publishing.

Godwin is a three-time National Book Award finalist and is the bestselling author of fourteen novels including Flora, Evensong, and The Good Husband.

  Novelist Lauren Oliver has made her mark in Young Adult literature with such book as Before I Fall, Panic and the Delirium Trilogy. Oliver is making her first foray into Adult fiction with Rooms, a tale of two ghosts trapped in the walls of an old house and the family whose home and lives overlap with their own.

    Bob Mankoff is the cartoon editor of The New Yorker magazine and he has the best job in the world. At least, that’s what everyone tells him.

In his new memoir, How About Never – Is Never Good For You? My Life in Cartoons, Mankoff illustrates that in fact he has two amazing jobs. Editor and is also one of the magazine foremost cartoonists himself.

    Garrison Keillor is a storyteller, humorist, essayist, newspaper columnist, screenwriter, poet and broadcaster.

Now a single volume brings together the full range of his work: essays, stories, excerpts from novels and newspaper columns. 

  Charles M. Blow has been a columnist at the New York Times since 2008. He is known for penning intensely personal pieces and now tells his extraordinary life story in his memoir, Fire Shut Up in My Bones.

The book explores racial, spiritual and sexual complexities and is Blow’s coming of age story of psychic survival and self invention.

  Historian Jill Lepore was researching an article for The New Yorker on the history of Planned Parenthood and a paper on the history of evidence when she discovered that both were connected to comic book hero - Wonder Woman. That led to her new book: The Secret History of Wonder Woman.

  Carl Hiaasen writes a regular column for the Miami Herald and is the author of many bestselling novels including Star Island and Bad Monkey for adults and Hoot, Chomp, Scat, and Flush for young readers. His latest, Skink - No Surrender is his first novel for teens.

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