The Book Show

Tuesdays, 3pm - 3:30pm; Thursdays, 8:30pm - 9pm

Each week on The Book Show, host Joe Donahue interviews authors about their books, their lives and their craft. It is a celebration of both reading and writers. 

As the son of a librarian, Joe has been part of the book world since childhood. His first job was as a library assistant, during college he was a clerk at an independent book store and for the past 25 years he has been interviewing authors about their books on the radio.

He is also the host of The Roundtable on WAMC Northeast Public Radio, a 3-hour general interest talk show. Notable authors he has interviewed include: Kurt Vonnegut, John Irving, John Updike, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Arthur Miller, Stephen King, Amy Tan, Anne Rice, Philip Roth, E.L Doctorow, Richard Russo, David Sedaris and Maya Angelou. 

Joe  has won several awards for his interviews, including honors from the Associated Press, the Edward R. Murrow Awards, the New York State Association of Broadcasters, The Headliners, The National Press Club and the Scripps-Howard Foundation. 

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  Dancer, choreographer, and director Bill T. Jones reflects on his art and life in his new book: Story/Time. The book is filled with telling vignettes--about Jones's childhood as part of a large, poor, Southern family that migrated to upstate New York; about his struggles to find a place for himself in a white-dominated dance world; and about his encounters with notable artists and musicians.

    Diane Ackerman is the author of the books: One Hundred Names for Love, A Natural History of the Senses, and The Zookeeper's Wife. In her latest book, The Human Age, she offers some optimism for our planet and explores the ways people are shaping the modern world, and argues for a new understanding of our relationship with the environment and our own bodies.

  

  The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald is a revered classic and a rite of passage in the reading lives of millions. In her new book, So We Read On, Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan offers a fresh perspective on what makes Gatsby great – and utterly unusual.

  Chrysler Szarlan’s debut novel, The Hawley Book of the Dead, introduces us to Revelation Dyer. Together, she and her husband Jeremy have three daughters, a beautiful home, and a world-famous Las Vegas magic act.

But Reve has many secrets, secrets that have not only shaped her past but now threaten her family.

    In what is being called by critics, the greatest novel of his career, Martin Amis’ latest, The Zone of Interest, provides a searing portrait of life – and, shockingly, love – in a concentration camp.

In the novel, the stories of the commander of the camp, the nephew of Hitler’s secretary, and a prisoner at the camp, all converge.

    In her followup to the best-selling Loving Frank, Nancy Horan recounts the improbably love affair between Scottish author, Robert Louis Stevenson and his American wife, Fanny Osbourne.

In The Wide and Starry Sky, Horan invites us to explore The Stevensons unusual relationship and the ways they changed the literary and artistic landscape around them.

  Based on one of the great unsolved murders in mob history, and the rise-and-fall of a real-life hero, The Big Crowd tells the sweeping story of Charlie O’Kane. He is the American dream come to life, a poor Irish immigrant who worked his way up from beat cop to mayor of New York at the city’s dazzling, post-war zenith. Famous, powerful, and married to a glamorous fashion model, he is looked up to by millions, including his younger brother, Tom. So when Charlie is accused of abetting a shocking mob murder, Tom sets out to clear his brother’s name while hiding a secret of his own.

Kevin Baker is a novelist, historian, and journalist.

    Walter Mosley is the author of more than 43 books, most notably 13 Easy Rawlins mysteries.

His latest, Rose Gold, continues Mosley’s ongoing and unique achievement in combining the mystery/PI genre with a rich social history of post war Los Angeles.

  In 1981 Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Alison Lurie published The Language of Clothes, a meditation on costume and fashion as an expression of history, social status and individual psychology. Amusing, enlightening and full of literary allusion, the book was highly praised and widely anthologized.

Now Lurie has returned with a companion book, The Language of Houses, a lucid, provocative and entertaining look at how the architecture of buildings and the spaces within them both reflect and affect the people who inhabit them.

    Joe Gannon is a writer and spoken word artist. He was also a freelance journalist during the Sandinista Revolution, writing for the Christian Science Monitor and the San Francisco Examiner.

In his new novel, Night of the Jaguar, he takes readers to the land of Nicaragua in the mid-eighties, a place recovering from one conflict and descending into another.

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