The Book Show

Tuesdays, 3pm - 3:30pm; Thursdays, 8:30pm - 9pm

Each week on The Book Show, host Joe Donahue interviews authors about their books, their lives and their craft. It is a celebration of both reading and writers. 

As the son of a librarian, Joe has been part of the book world since childhood. His first job was as a library assistant, during college he was a clerk at an independent book store and for the past 25 years he has been interviewing authors about their books on the radio.

He is also the host of The Roundtable on WAMC Northeast Public Radio, a 3-hour general interest talk show. Notable authors he has interviewed include: Kurt Vonnegut, John Irving, John Updike, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Arthur Miller, Stephen King, Amy Tan, Anne Rice, Philip Roth, E.L Doctorow, Richard Russo, David Sedaris and Maya Angelou. 

Joe  has won several awards for his interviews, including honors from the Associated Press, the Edward R. Murrow Awards, the New York State Association of Broadcasters, The Headliners, The National Press Club and the Scripps-Howard Foundation. 

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Twitter: @The_Book_Show

    

  For years, P.J. O’Rourke has trained his wit and critical eye on institutions ranging from the U.S. Government and the global economy to the automobile industry and American politics.

In his new book, The Baby Boom: How it Got That Way – And it Wasn’t My Fault…And I’ll Never Do it Again, he trains his eye on his own generation. He leads readers on an expedition into the world of the boomer psyche.

He has written 16-books, including the bestsellers, Parliament of Whores and Give War a Chance

    

  New Yorker staff writer and best-selling author Elizabeth Kolbert offers a startling look at the mass extinction currently unfolding before us in her new book – The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History.

Over the last half billion years, there have been five major mass extinctions – we’ll learn more about the sixth with Elizabeth Kolbert.

  Armistead Maupin first introduced readers to the cast of 28 Barbary Lane, including the beloved transgender landlady, Anna Madrigal, in the 1970’s with a groundbreaking newspaper serial. Now, 35-years years after Tales of the City was published, Maupin takes us back to San Francisco for the ninth and final book in the series.

    Amy Tan has a new novel for the first time in seven years. Her newest is The Valley of Amazement.

Like many of works by the author of The Joy Luck Club, it deals with China's history and also tense mother-daughter relationships.

    Playwright, author and activist Eve Ensler traces many paths of reconnection in her memoir, In the Body of the World.

It is the path of reconnection with her body, after she is diagnosed with cancer; with the people of the world, in the face of injustice and abuse; and with the earth.

    Pulitzer Prize-winning author Paul Harding returns with a follow-up to 2009's Tinkers. This time, Harding builds his story around the grandson of Tinkers protagonist, George Crosby.

In Enon: A Novel, Harding follows a year in the life of Charlie Crosby as he tries to come to terms with a shattering personal tragedy.

    Jamie Ford's first novel, Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, was a surprise New York Times bestseller. His second book, Songs of Willow Frost is the story of a Chinese-American orphan in Seattle during The Great Depression.

  Scott Turow knows how to write legal thrillers. The lawyer-novelist has penned bestsellers like Presumed Innocent and Burden of Proof.

He latest novel is Identical - and while there are lawyers and an unsolved murder, it is a story about the almost mystical connection that binds together identical twins.

    Neil Gaiman, one of the world's most beloved fantasy authors, is known for his eclectic work including: The Sandman, Stardust, American Gods, Coraline and The Graveyard Book.

Now he's written his first novel for adults in eight years, The Ocean at the End of the Lane - a bewitching and harrowing tale of mystery and survival, and memory and magic which makes the impossible all too real.


Pete Hamill is a veteran New York journalist and novelist. He's the author of numerous books, including Downtown: My Manhattan and his memoir, A Drinking Life. His nine novels include Snow in August, Forever and Tabloid City. His new book is The Christmas Kid: And Other Brooklyn Stories, a collection of Brooklyn-based stories spanning thirty years.

    Readers prize Ann Patchett for her inspired fiction, with novels such as State of Wonder, and Bel Canto – but since the beginning of her career, she has written non-fiction pieces which are collected in the book, This is the Story of a Happy Marriage. For the book she has selected some of her finest pieces, curating a collection that reads almost like memoir. 

    Mitch Albom has written seven books, including the bestselling memoir, Tuesdays with Morrie.

In his new novel, The First Phone Call From Heaven, Mitch Albom follows the residents of the small town of Coldwater, MI, several of whom begin to receive phone calls that seem to be from the dead.

    Having recalled his life through the story of his physical self in Winter Journal, novelist Paul Auster now remembers the experience of his development from within through the encounters of his interior self with the outer world in Report from the Interior.

    Andre Dubus III is the author of the critically acclaimed novel, House of Sand and Fog, and the memoir, Townie. In his new collection of novellas, Dirty Love, he tells stories of love tainted and gone wrong.

    Anne Perry’s novels are thought-provoking, atmospheric thrillers which include plotlines that ask soul-searching questions about the moral and ethical values of society both yesterday and today.

In her latest, Blind Justice, she exposes the vulnerabilities of organized religion, the precarious boundaries of justice and the flaws within the legal system.

    The New York Times has called T. C. Boyle “one of the most inventive and verbally exuberant writers of his generation.”

Boyle is the bestselling author of fourteen novels and nine short story collections. His newest book is T. C. Boyle Stories II, a 944-page sequel to T. C. Boyle Stories I -published in 1998.

    On this week’s Book Show we welcome two writers – a mother and her son – both who are no strangers to bestseller lists.

Anne Rice is one of America's most read and celebrated authors. Her books are rich tapestries of history, belief, philosophy, religion, and compelling characters. Her latest is The Wolves of Midwinter.

Christopher Rice is the author of four bestsellers, his latest being the supernatural thriller, The Heaven’s Rise.

    The author of two collections of short stories and 28 previous suspense novels, Jeffrey Deaver is best known for his Kathryn Dance and Lincoln Rhyme thrillers, most notably The Bone Collector, which was made into a feature film starring Denzel Washington and Angelina Jolie.

His latest is The October List - a novel told in reverse.

    Elizabeth Gilbert - author of the #1 New York Times bestseller, Eat, Pray, Love, returns to fiction with her first novel in 13-years.

The Signature of All Things is an epic story of desire, ambition and the thirst for knowledge spanning the 18th and 19th centuries – telling the birth to death story of botanist Alma Whittaker.

    Louise Penny’s New York Times bestselling and critically revered mystery series has been synonymous with the words elegance, depth, and empathy since her mystery debut, Still Life, 7-years ago.

Now, the wise and beleaguered Chief Inspector Armand Gamache faces his nemesis and uncovers shattering revelations in How the Light Gets In.

    Edwidge Danticat has written her first work of fiction in 9-years. Set in a seaside town in Haiti, Claire of the Sea Light unfolds over the course of one evening during which a father struggles with the painful decision of whether to give away his beloved daughter in the hopes she will find a better life with someone else.

    After two acclaimed historical novels, one of Canada’s most celebrated writers now gives us the contemporary story of a man studying the suddenly confusing shape his life has taken, and why, and what his responsibilities—as a husband, a father, a brother, and an uncle—truly are.

Dennis Bock’s new novel is Going Home Again.

  After eight commanding works of fiction, Pulitzer Prize winner Richard Russo now turns to memoir in a hilarious, moving, and always surprising account of his life, his parents, and the upstate New York town they all struggled variously to escape.

Anyone familiar with Richard Russo's acclaimed novels will recognize Gloversville - once famous for producing gloves and anything else made of leather. This is where the author grew up, the only son of an aspirant mother and a charming, feckless father who were born into this close-knit community. But by the time of his childhood in the 1950s, prosperity was replaced by poverty and illness (often tannery-related), with everyone barely scraping by.

    When Clive Cussler published his first novel, The Mediterranean Caper, in 1973, he knew he didn’t want to write a familiar kind of character – no spy or detective or undercover investigator – his hero would have grand adventures set on or under water. Cussler named him Dirk Pitt, and his organization the National Underwater and Marine Agency, or NUMA – and a beloved literary series character was born. 

In the new novel, Love Is a Canoe, partly set in the village of Millerton, NY, Ben Schrank delivers a smart, funny, romantic novel about the fragility of marriage and the difficulty of repairing the damage when well-intentioned people forget how to be good to one another.

Ben Schrank is also the author of the novels Consent and Miracle Man.

    Former Deputy D.A. Alafair Burke’s ninth novel, If You Were Here: A Novel of Suspense, is about Manhattan Journalist, McKenna Jordan.

She thinks she has a scoop when she obtains a video showing a woman pulling a boy from harm on subway tracks. When the mystery woman appears to be McKenna’s close friend who disappeared a decade earlier, the story becomes increasingly complex.

Zadie Smith's fourth novel, NW, is a return of sorts to the voices and the northwest London landscape of her 2000 debut, White Teeth. Her tragi-comic new novel follows four Londoners - Leah, Natalie, Felix and Nathan – as they try to make adult lives outside of Caldwell, the council estate of their childhood. From private houses to public parks, at work and at play, their London is a complicated place.

    Michael Connelly started his career as a newspaper reporter, eventually working as a police and crime reporter for The Los Angeles Times. While there, he covered the 1992 riots – a time and place to which he returns in the book, The Black Box, which stars LAPD detective, Harry Bosch.

Previously aired as Book Show #1279.

At the heart of Rilla Askew’s new novel, Kind of Kin, are social and political issues that continue to rend the fabric of America: illegal immigration, conflicting cultures, the abuse of power, and the tension between faith and government.

Askew has written an investigation of how sweeping, agenda-driven legislation affects real, individual lives.

    

  The Fun Parts: Stories is a hilarious collection of stories from the writer The New York Times called “the novelist of his generation.”

Returning to the form in which he began, Sam Lipsyte, author of the New York Times bestseller The Ask, offers up a book of bold, hilarious, and deeply felt collection of stories, some first published in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, or Playboy.

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