The Book Show

Tuesdays, 3pm - 3:30pm; Thursdays, 8:30pm - 9pm

Each week on The Book Show, host Joe Donahue interviews authors about their books, their lives and their craft. It is a celebration of both reading and writers. 

As the son of a librarian, Joe has been part of the book world since childhood. His first job was as a library assistant, during college he was a clerk at an independent book store and for the past 25 years he has been interviewing authors about their books on the radio.

He is also the host of The Roundtable on WAMC Northeast Public Radio, a 3-hour general interest talk show. Notable authors he has interviewed include: Kurt Vonnegut, John Irving, John Updike, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Arthur Miller, Stephen King, Amy Tan, Anne Rice, Philip Roth, E.L Doctorow, Richard Russo, David Sedaris and Maya Angelou. 

Joe  has won several awards for his interviews, including honors from the Associated Press, the Edward R. Murrow Awards, the New York State Association of Broadcasters, The Headliners, The National Press Club and the Scripps-Howard Foundation. 

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    Pulitzer Prize-winning author Paul Harding returns with a follow-up to 2009's Tinkers. This time, Harding builds his story around the grandson of Tinkers protagonist, George Crosby.

In Enon: A Novel, Harding follows a year in the life of Charlie Crosby as he tries to come to terms with a shattering personal tragedy.

    Jamie Ford's first novel, Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, was a surprise New York Times bestseller. His second book, Songs of Willow Frost is the story of a Chinese-American orphan in Seattle during The Great Depression.

  Scott Turow knows how to write legal thrillers. The lawyer-novelist has penned bestsellers like Presumed Innocent and Burden of Proof.

He latest novel is Identical - and while there are lawyers and an unsolved murder, it is a story about the almost mystical connection that binds together identical twins.

    Neil Gaiman, one of the world's most beloved fantasy authors, is known for his eclectic work including: The Sandman, Stardust, American Gods, Coraline and The Graveyard Book.

Now he's written his first novel for adults in eight years, The Ocean at the End of the Lane - a bewitching and harrowing tale of mystery and survival, and memory and magic which makes the impossible all too real.


Pete Hamill is a veteran New York journalist and novelist. He's the author of numerous books, including Downtown: My Manhattan and his memoir, A Drinking Life. His nine novels include Snow in August, Forever and Tabloid City. His new book is The Christmas Kid: And Other Brooklyn Stories, a collection of Brooklyn-based stories spanning thirty years.

    Readers prize Ann Patchett for her inspired fiction, with novels such as State of Wonder, and Bel Canto – but since the beginning of her career, she has written non-fiction pieces which are collected in the book, This is the Story of a Happy Marriage. For the book she has selected some of her finest pieces, curating a collection that reads almost like memoir. 

    Mitch Albom has written seven books, including the bestselling memoir, Tuesdays with Morrie.

In his new novel, The First Phone Call From Heaven, Mitch Albom follows the residents of the small town of Coldwater, MI, several of whom begin to receive phone calls that seem to be from the dead.

    Having recalled his life through the story of his physical self in Winter Journal, novelist Paul Auster now remembers the experience of his development from within through the encounters of his interior self with the outer world in Report from the Interior.

    Andre Dubus III is the author of the critically acclaimed novel, House of Sand and Fog, and the memoir, Townie. In his new collection of novellas, Dirty Love, he tells stories of love tainted and gone wrong.

    Anne Perry’s novels are thought-provoking, atmospheric thrillers which include plotlines that ask soul-searching questions about the moral and ethical values of society both yesterday and today.

In her latest, Blind Justice, she exposes the vulnerabilities of organized religion, the precarious boundaries of justice and the flaws within the legal system.

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