The Book Show

Tuesdays, 3pm - 3:30pm; Thursdays, 8:30pm - 9pm

Each week on The Book Show, host Joe Donahue interviews authors about their books, their lives and their craft. It is a celebration of both reading and writers. 

As the son of a librarian, Joe has been part of the book world since childhood. His first job was as a library assistant, during college he was a clerk at an independent book store and for the past 25 years he has been interviewing authors about their books on the radio.

He is also the host of The Roundtable on WAMC Northeast Public Radio, a 3-hour general interest talk show. Notable authors he has interviewed include: Kurt Vonnegut, John Irving, John Updike, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Arthur Miller, Stephen King, Amy Tan, Anne Rice, Philip Roth, E.L Doctorow, Richard Russo, David Sedaris and Maya Angelou. 

Joe  has won several awards for his interviews, including honors from the Associated Press, the Edward R. Murrow Awards, the New York State Association of Broadcasters, The Headliners, The National Press Club and the Scripps-Howard Foundation. 

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    Anne Perry’s novels are thought-provoking, atmospheric thrillers which include plotlines that ask soul-searching questions about the moral and ethical values of society both yesterday and today.

In her latest, Blind Justice, she exposes the vulnerabilities of organized religion, the precarious boundaries of justice and the flaws within the legal system.

    The New York Times has called T. C. Boyle “one of the most inventive and verbally exuberant writers of his generation.”

Boyle is the bestselling author of fourteen novels and nine short story collections. His newest book is T. C. Boyle Stories II, a 944-page sequel to T. C. Boyle Stories I -published in 1998.

    On this week’s Book Show we welcome two writers – a mother and her son – both who are no strangers to bestseller lists.

Anne Rice is one of America's most read and celebrated authors. Her books are rich tapestries of history, belief, philosophy, religion, and compelling characters. Her latest is The Wolves of Midwinter.

Christopher Rice is the author of four bestsellers, his latest being the supernatural thriller, The Heaven’s Rise.

    The author of two collections of short stories and 28 previous suspense novels, Jeffrey Deaver is best known for his Kathryn Dance and Lincoln Rhyme thrillers, most notably The Bone Collector, which was made into a feature film starring Denzel Washington and Angelina Jolie.

His latest is The October List - a novel told in reverse.

    Elizabeth Gilbert - author of the #1 New York Times bestseller, Eat, Pray, Love, returns to fiction with her first novel in 13-years.

The Signature of All Things is an epic story of desire, ambition and the thirst for knowledge spanning the 18th and 19th centuries – telling the birth to death story of botanist Alma Whittaker.

    Louise Penny’s New York Times bestselling and critically revered mystery series has been synonymous with the words elegance, depth, and empathy since her mystery debut, Still Life, 7-years ago.

Now, the wise and beleaguered Chief Inspector Armand Gamache faces his nemesis and uncovers shattering revelations in How the Light Gets In.

    Edwidge Danticat has written her first work of fiction in 9-years. Set in a seaside town in Haiti, Claire of the Sea Light unfolds over the course of one evening during which a father struggles with the painful decision of whether to give away his beloved daughter in the hopes she will find a better life with someone else.

    After two acclaimed historical novels, one of Canada’s most celebrated writers now gives us the contemporary story of a man studying the suddenly confusing shape his life has taken, and why, and what his responsibilities—as a husband, a father, a brother, and an uncle—truly are.

Dennis Bock’s new novel is Going Home Again.

  After eight commanding works of fiction, Pulitzer Prize winner Richard Russo now turns to memoir in a hilarious, moving, and always surprising account of his life, his parents, and the upstate New York town they all struggled variously to escape.

Anyone familiar with Richard Russo's acclaimed novels will recognize Gloversville - once famous for producing gloves and anything else made of leather. This is where the author grew up, the only son of an aspirant mother and a charming, feckless father who were born into this close-knit community. But by the time of his childhood in the 1950s, prosperity was replaced by poverty and illness (often tannery-related), with everyone barely scraping by.

    When Clive Cussler published his first novel, The Mediterranean Caper, in 1973, he knew he didn’t want to write a familiar kind of character – no spy or detective or undercover investigator – his hero would have grand adventures set on or under water. Cussler named him Dirk Pitt, and his organization the National Underwater and Marine Agency, or NUMA – and a beloved literary series character was born. 

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