Morning Edition

Weekdays, 5am - 9am

For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Its cast of regulars includes some of the most familiar voices on radio: correspondent Susan Stamberg; commentator Frank Deford; news analysts Cokie Roberts and Juan Williams; and newscasters Jean Cochran and Carl Kasell.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

5:06 - StarDate
6:53 - Paul Caiano's Weather
7:34 - Academic Minute
7:50 - Marketplace
8:35 - Writer's Almanac
8:50 - Marketplace

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187ee52e1c8156e5bf7705e|5187edcfe1c8156e5bf76f38

Pages

Around the Nation
6:42 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Water Dispute Heightens Tensions Between U.S., Mexico

Mexico and the United States are supposed to share water according to a 70-year-old treaty that aims to protect each nation's needs. But prolonged drought is testing that relationship. Mexico is behind by 38 percent on its deliveries.

WAMC News
6:07 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Yanks Five-Run Eighth Rescues Game

Credit AP

In baseball, the Yankees put together a five-run eighth to turn a 4-1 deficit into a 6-4 win over the Chicago White Sox. Alfonso Soriano sparked the comeback with a two-run single and Curtis Granderson singled home the tying run before Eduardo Nunez lined a two-run double.

Elsewhere in the American League, Boston defeated Detroit 2-1. Will Middlebrooks hit a two-run single in the fifth off Max Scherzer.

Read more
NPR Story
4:46 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Obama Considers Training Options For Syrian Rebels

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 6:42 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

President Obama has promised limited military action against Syria. He says missile strikes are not about regime change and there will be no boots on the ground. But even as the Congress debates the president's plans for action, the White House is looking at broader options.

NPR's Tom Bowman reports the president may call on the U.S. military to help build up the Syrian opposition.

Read more
Around the Nation
4:46 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Las Vegas Gambles On Unique Business Incubator

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 11:12 am

The Downtown Container Park will set up budding entrepreneurs in repurposed shipping containers. The park will have 35 containers and a bunch of modular cubes like you'd normally see at a construction site — all to house local businesses.

NPR Story
4:46 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Congress Should Examine Fine Print When Voting On Syria

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 6:42 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And as Congress prepares to vote on authorizing force, Yale Law Professor Stephen L. Carter has some advice.

STEPHEN L. CARTER: The one thing I would strongly recommend is that members of Congress actually read the resolution before deciding whether to vote for it or not.

MONTAGNE: He says it's hard to approve of a president waging war while still limiting the power the president is given.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Read more
Shots - Health News
3:43 am
Wed September 4, 2013

For Hospital Patients, Observation Status Can Prove Costly

The next bed could cost you a lot if the hospital says you're there on observation.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 9:25 am

If you're on Medicare and you're in the hospital for a few days, you may think you're an inpatient. The hospital may have other ideas. Increasingly, hospitals are placing older patients on "observation status." They may be there for days, but technically they're still outpatients.

This is a big deal for someone on Medicare because follow-up treatment in a nursing home isn't covered unless someone has been an inpatient for at least three days. That's leaving some seniors on the hook for thousands of dollars in nursing home bills.

Read more
Law
3:34 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Is It Legal For Undocumented Immigrant To Practice Law?

Sergio Garcia speaks at The Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA) news conference on Aug. 27. Garcia, 36, is a law school graduate who passed California's bar examination, but he's living in the United States illegally. California State Bar officials have not issued him a lawyer's license because of his immigration status.
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 3:44 pm

On Wednesday, the California Supreme Court holds oral arguments in a case that will determine whether Sergio Garcia, an undocumented immigrant, can become a licensed attorney.

The case has drawn attention from legal groups across the country and comes amid the larger national fight over immigration reform.

On the side of Garcia are the State Bar of California and the California attorney general. Opposing his admission to the bar is the Justice Department, among others.

'This Is The Country I Know'

Read more
The Salt
3:26 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Small Farmers In New England Fear New Food Safety Rules

Joe Buley owns Screamin' Ridge Farm in Montpelier, Vt. He says the FDA's new food safety rules threaten the viability of small New England farm operations like his. Here, Buley harvests cucumbers.
Emily Corwin

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 6:42 am

Back in January, the Food and Drug Administration issued two proposed food safety rules to prevent tainted food from entering the food supply.

Read more
Sweetness And Light
2:15 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Why Keep Athletes Eligible But Uneducated?

Ersin Kisacik iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 4:31 pm

Each football season brings exciting plays and game heroes, but Frank Deford says the real heroes are often overlooked.

As another school year and college football season gets underway, Deford looks at the frustrations and challenges facing educators to keep student athletes eligible.

Click on the audio link above to hear Deford's take on this issue.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:36 am
Tue September 3, 2013

McCain Says Right Strikes Can Hurt Assad's Capabilities

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., and Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., met with President Obama on Sunday at the White House.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 1:18 pm

By "taking out Bashar Assad's delivery capabilities of chemical weapons" the U.S. can make it much harder for the Syrian leader to wage war against his people and perhaps level the fighting field or turn it in favor of Assad's opponents, Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona said Tuesday on Morning Edition.

Read more

Pages