Morning Edition

Weekdays, 5am - 9am

For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Its cast of regulars includes some of the most familiar voices on radio: correspondent Susan Stamberg; commentator Frank Deford; news analysts Cokie Roberts and Juan Williams; and newscasters Jean Cochran and Carl Kasell.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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New York News
7:35 am
Mon September 2, 2013

NY Plans Free Associate's Degree For 6,000

Credit wikipedia commons

New York officials say 16 new partnerships between state colleges, public schools and private companies will result in 6,000 students earning associate's degrees at no cost to their families and put them at the front of the line for those companies' skilled jobs in manufacturing, information technology and health care.

The so-called P-TECH model follows IBM's Pathways in Technology Early College High School program in New York City.

According to the governor's office, pending negotiation of each applicant's budget, they will enroll their first class in September 2014.

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New England News
7:23 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Health Care Boss Defends Backing Medical Marijuana

Credit U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Wikimedia Commons Public Domain

The president of a western Massachusetts health care agency is defending her decision supporting medical marijuana in Massachusetts.

The Greenfield Recorder reports that Susan Stubbs, president of ServiceNet, said in an email to employees that the benefits of medical marijuana are compelling and outweigh any problems.

She says she's aware that many people, especially those who help people battle addiction were against legalizing medical marijuana.

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Sports
7:05 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Red Sox Sweep Chicago After 7-6 win

Credit Keith Allison/Flickr

In baseball, David Ortiz had two hits and three RBIs to help power the Red Sox past Chicago 7-6 yesterday and complete a three-game sweep. Stephen Drew added a solo homer for the AL East-leading Red Sox, who won for the seventh time in eight games.

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Around the Nation
6:56 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Long Island Man Legally Changes His Name To Santa Claus

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. A Long Island man legally changed his name to Santa Claus. Whatever benefits he may get from that, it did not free him from jury duty. Santa Claus was summoned to court. Santa Claus was put on a jury panel. For this defendant, a jury of his peers included the man who showed up wearing a red dress shirt with a picture of Santa Claus and eight reindeer. Santa could have been among those deciding the trial except the case was dismissed. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Animals
6:50 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Wild Stork Picked Up For Spying In Egypt

A fisherman saw the bird along the Nile River with a suspicious electronic device fixed to its wing. The fisherman made a citizen's arrest. Concerned officials found it was not a spying device, just a wildlife tracker.

weather
6:13 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Meteorologist Jason Caterina's Forecast

Newschannel 13 Meteorologist Jason Caterina gives the WAMC Morning Edition forecast.

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Race
4:45 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Paris Has Been A Haven For African Americans Escaping Racism

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 4:53 am

The City Of Lights became known as a beacon of freedom and tolerance for African Americans. Paris is rich in black history — especially from black Americans who have flocked there since the 19th century.

Remembrances
4:45 am
Mon September 2, 2013

British Journalist Sir David Frost Dies At 74

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep. We're saying good-bye, this morning, to the man who conducted one of the most famous television interviews in history.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED INTERVIEW)

DAVID FROST: So what in a sense you're saying, is that there are certain situations where the president can decide that it's in the best interests of the nation or something and do something illegal?

PRESIDENT RICHARD NIXON: Well, when the President does it that means it's not illegal.

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Around the Nation
4:45 am
Mon September 2, 2013

In Maine, Even With A GPS, You Can't Get There From Here

If you're planning that last summer road trip, you might want to pull those maps out of the attic.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 10:58 am

Once a standard fixture at every gas station, good old fashioned paper maps have all but folded in the digital age. But, there are places that can baffle your high tech gadgets.

Getting yourself lost in a rural state is an easy thing to do. Pavement turns into dirt track, and before you know it, you're driving through miles of woods and boulders, and your GPS isn't helping.

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Politics
3:31 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Syria Resolution Could Be A Hard Sell On Capitol Hill

From left, Rep. Sander Levin, D-Mich., Rep. Robert Scott, D-Va., and Rep. Brad Schneider, D- ll., walk to a closed members-only briefing on Syria on Sunday.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 6:41 pm

Twenty-four hours after President Obama announced on Saturday that he'll wait for congressional authorization before launching strikes on Syria; members of Congress attended a classified briefing at the Capitol.

For days, most of the discontent among members of Congress has been about not being included in the deliberations on Syria, about not getting the chance to vote. Now that they've gotten their way, each member of Congress will have to go on the record.

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