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For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Its cast of regulars includes some of the most familiar voices on radio: correspondent Susan Stamberg; commentator Frank Deford; news analysts Cokie Roberts and Juan Williams; and newscasters Jean Cochran and Carl Kasell.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Movie Reviews
5:13 am
Fri July 12, 2013

'Pacific Rim' Is Filled To The Brim With Special Effects

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 6:06 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Another movie opening is "Pacific Rim." Critic Kenneth Turan says it has plenty of explosions and special effects, but he says there's actually more to it than most of the other blockbusters this summer.

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Environment
5:13 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Environmentalists Warn Olympic Games Will Harm Sochi

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 6:19 am

Russia is preparing for the 2014 Winter Games — turning a sleepy valley in the Northern Caucasus Mountains into an Olympic village, with brand-new facilities for every Alpine sport. Officials say it will be a world-class destination for winter-sports enthusiasts long after the Games are over. Environmentalists say it's an ecological disaster in the making.

The Two-Way
3:22 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Chuck Foley, Co-Creator Of Twister, Dies At 82

Festivalgoers play a giant game of Twister during the Glastonbury Festival of Contemporary Performing Arts in southwest England last month.
Andrew Cowie AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 10:40 am

One of the men responsible for getting people tied up in knots while they played Twister has died.

Charles "Chuck" Foley died earlier this month in St. Paul, Minn. He was 82.

Foley and his business partner Neil Rabens invented the game for Milton Bradley in 1966. The pair originally called it Pretzel, and it was Milton Bradley who came up with the name Twister.

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Parallels
3:19 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Israel's Internal Battle Over Ultra-Orthodox Soldiers

Soldiers close the gate to the tiny West Bank outpost, right next door to a Jewish settlement, where the HaHod platoon of the ultra-Orthodox Netzah Yahuda battalion is stationed.
Emily Harris/NPR

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 8:14 am

Moshe Haim always wanted to be a soldier. The 20-year-old is now a sergeant, more than halfway through three years of service in the Israeli military.

But when he goes home on leave, he doesn't talk about his military experiences to any of his eight siblings, especially his brothers.

"I know that for my parents and my brothers, the first, best choice is to be in the yeshiva and study there," he says at a small West Bank outpost where he's stationed. "It wasn't good for me, but my brothers are still pure."

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Middle East
3:17 am
Fri July 12, 2013

In Southern Syria, Rebels Say U.S. Support Is Critical

Free Syrian Army fighters after a battle against government troops in Zaizoon, near Dera'a, on Feb. 16.
Shaam News Network Landov

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 8:38 pm

The battle for the city of Dera'a in southern Syria has become a test of an American pledge to give military support to rebels fighting Syrian President Bashar Assad. After a string of defeats, the rebels have scored rare victories around Dera'a.

But in interviews,rebel commanders passing through neighboring Jordan say those gains could be lost without a dependable arms pipeline and promised U.S. support.

Yasser Aboud, a thin, intense former colonel in the Syrian army, commands the joint operations center for southern Syria.

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StoryCorps
10:03 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

A Father And Daughter 'Keep The Faith' During Cancer Fight

Faith in 2008, on her fifth birthday.
Courtesy of Jerris Marr

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 5:13 am

For the past three years, StoryCorps' Legacy program has given people facing serious illness the chance to record interviews with loved ones and caregivers. Recently, StoryCorps expanded the program to include children.

In 2007, Faith Marr was diagnosed with a rare bone cancer on her spine. She was 4 years old. That year she had her first of eight surgeries, replacing her vertebrae with titanium rods. Doctors were uncertain about her chances of survival.

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New York News
8:38 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Poll: Spitzer Quickly Gains Upper Hand In NYC Race

Credit wikipedia commons

The first poll taken since Eliot Spitzer leaped into the New York City comptroller's race shows the ex-governor gaining a quick advantage over fellow Democrat Scott Stringer.

The Wall Street Journal-NBC 4 New York-Marist poll shows registered Democrats favoring Spitzer over Stringer by 42 percent to 33 percent. That includes voters who are undecided but leaning toward a candidate.

Spitzer resigned amid a prostitution scandal in 2008. Stringer is Manhattan's borough president.

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WAMC News
8:09 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Boston Marathon Bombing Suspect Pleads Not Guilty

Credit FBI

Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has pleaded not guilty to 30 counts including use of a weapon of mass destruction to kill.

He entered the plea Wednesday in federal court in Boston.

For the first one, he leaned toward a microphone and said, "Not guilty," in a Russian accent. He then said not guilty repeatedly about a half-dozen more times.

His sister sobbed loudly as he left the courtroom. He looked over and made a kiss motion with his mouth to his family.

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New York News
7:53 am
Thu July 11, 2013

For Spitzer, A Scramble To Get On Ballot In NYC

Eliot Spitzer's 11th-hour comeback campaign to become New York City comptroller isn't just a race to the finish. It's a sprint to the start.

After plunging into the race Monday, the ex-governor has only until midnight to collect 3,750 valid signatures to get on the Democratic primary ballot. Experts say it's a formidable, but doable, task given the narrow time frame.

A Spitzer spokeswoman said Wednesday the campaign is "diligently gathering signatures." She wouldn't comment further.

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New York News
7:33 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Schumer Pushes Long-Term Stream Gauge Funding

Credit wikipedia commons

WASHINGTON – There are 56 federally funded flood gauges in the Hudson Valley with a total of over 200 throughout the entire state. Funding expires on a regular basis and there is an ongoing battle to have it restored.

Senator Charles Schumer (D-NY) announced on Wednesday he is pushing to have long-term funding for the gauges – 300 new ones in New York alone.

He acknowledged the federal budget is facing tough times, but he said not providing the $63 million to expand the flood gauge program would be pennywise and pound-foolish.

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