Morning Edition

Weekdays, 5am - 9am

For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Its cast of regulars includes some of the most familiar voices on radio: correspondent Susan Stamberg; commentator Frank Deford; news analysts Cokie Roberts and Juan Williams; and newscasters Jean Cochran and Carl Kasell.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

5:06 - StarDate
6:53 - Paul Caiano's Weather
7:34 - Academic Minute
7:50 - Marketplace
8:35 - Writer's Almanac
8:50 - Marketplace

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weather
6:42 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Meteorologist Tim Drawbridge's Forecast

Credit WNYT

Newschannel 13 Meteorologist Tim drawbridge gives the WAMC Morning Edition forecast.

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Around the Nation
6:41 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Volunteers Sought For 1813 Flag Project

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene.

The Fourth of July weekend is over, but celebrations continue, and I'm not talking about left-over fireworks. The Maryland Historical Society is recreating the flag that flew over Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore 200 years ago. Mary Pickersgill and four others sewed the original Star Spangled Banner in 1813. Now volunteers will recreate it using the same type of fabric, stitching and time frame. They have six weeks to complete the 30-by-40 foot flag.

New York News
6:17 am
Mon July 8, 2013

AP Source: Ex-Gov. Spitzer Eying NYC Comptroller

Credit NY1

A person close to former New York Governor Eliot Spitzer says he is planning a return to politics with a run for New York City comptroller.

The person spoke on condition of anonymity because Spitzer was only speaking to The New York Times.

Candidates for citywide offices like comptroller have to have 3,750 signatures from registered voters in their party by Thursday.

Spitzer, a Democrat, stepped down from the governor's office in 2008 over a prostitution scandal.

He has spoken in the past about the potential for the comptroller's job.

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New England News
6:13 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Secretary Of State's Wife Hospitalized In Boston

Credit wikipedia commons

Teresa Heinz Kerry, the wife of U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, is hospitalized at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

A spokesman for John Kerry says Heinz Kerry was flown to Massachusetts General Hospital on Sunday night after being stabilized by doctors at Nantucket Cottage Hospital.

The 74-year-old Heinz Kerry taken to the emergency room in Nantucket, accompanied by her husband, after 3:30 p.m. Sunday. A hospital spokesman said she arrived at that facility in critical condition before being stabilized by doctors.

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Music
4:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Vibraphone Showcased In Jason Marsalis' 'Ballet Class'

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 6:03 am

Each month, NPR Music asks public radio personalities at member stations across the country to tell us about a song they can't get enough of. David Greene introduces listeners to member station WWNO's Gwen Thompkins — she's NPR's former East Africa correspondent. Her choice for July's installment of "Heavy Rotation," is "Ballet Class" by the Jason Marsalis Vibes Quartet.

Sports
4:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Britain's Own Andy Murray Wins Men's Title At Wimbledon

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 5:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

People in Britain are celebrating a new Wimbledon tennis champion this morning, a man born on their own soil.

(APPLAUSE)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Game, that's a match...

GREENE: That's early applause from the crowd yesterday, just before Andy Murray won in straight sets beating Novak Djokovic. Murray's victory ends 77 years of heartbreak. The last Brit to win the Wimbledon men's title: Fred Perry in 1936.

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Education
4:45 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Congress Called On To Reverse Student Loan Rate Increase

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 2:02 pm

Rates on federally subsidized Stafford loans, which help low and middle-income college students, doubled on July 1. There is now pressure for a deal to undo the increase. NPR's David Greene talks to Matthew Chingos, a fellow at the Brookings Institution's Brown Center on Education Policy.

Parallels
3:52 am
Mon July 8, 2013

EU-U.S. Trade: A Tale Of Two Farms

Farmer Richard Wilkins, a firm believer in genetically modified crops, examines the corn crop at his farm in Greenwood, Del. U.S. and EU officials begin talks Monday on an ambitious free-trade agreement. One stumbling block is agriculture. Unlike the U.S., the EU bans the cultivation of genetically modified crops.
Jackie Northam/NPR

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 2:12 pm

U.S. and EU officials begin talks Monday on an ambitious free-trade agreement aimed at generating billions of dollars of new trade. But negotiators must overcome barriers created by cultural and philosophical differences over sectors like agriculture. In Europe, the cultivation of genetically modified crops is banned, while in the U.S., they are a central part of food production. NPR's Jackie Northam visited a farm in Delaware and NPR's Eleanor Beardsley visited one in Burgundy, France, to look at those deep-seated differences. We hear from Jackie first.

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Shots - Health News
3:42 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Finding Simple Tests For Brain Disorders Turns Out To Be Complex

Anne Jones, 62, and Robin Jones, 73, at their home in Menlo Park, Calif. He took a test that revealed proteins typical of Alzheimer's disease.
Ramin Rahimian for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 1:17 pm

If you're having chest pain, your doctor can test you for a heart attack. If you're having hip pain, your doctor could test for osteoarthritis.

But what if you're depressed? Or anxious? Currently there are no physical tests for most disorders that affect the mind. Lab tests like these could transform the field of mental illness. So far efforts to come up with biomarkers for common mental health disorders have proved largely fruitless.

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Parallels
3:41 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Call Centers Call On Multilingual Portuguese

New employees train for call center work at Teleperformance Portugal, an outsourcing company in Lisbon. The outsourcing industry is adding thousands of jobs while other Portuguese industries shed them.
Jose Faria Courtesy of Teleperformance Portugal

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 1:04 pm

Filipa Neves speaks five languages but still couldn't find steady work in her native Portugal. So she was about to move to Angola, a former Portuguese colony in Africa, where the economy is booming.

But she sent off one last resumé — to a call center. It was sort of a last resort. She'd heard the stereotype.

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