Morning Edition

Weekdays, 5am - 9am

For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Its cast of regulars includes some of the most familiar voices on radio: correspondent Susan Stamberg; commentator Frank Deford; news analysts Cokie Roberts and Juan Williams; and newscasters Jean Cochran and Carl Kasell.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Around the Nation
7:31 am
Thu May 30, 2013

New Jersey Man Tries To Auction Off A Place In Heaven

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 2:51 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne, reporting there is no heaven on Earth, at least according to eBay. Seller Ari Mandel, formerly Orthodox Jewish, figured he'd done lot of good deeds and never worshipped false gods, so he would be a shoe-in for heaven. His offer on eBay reached $100,000 before the auction was shut down for violating eBay's policy against selling intangible things. This is MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

WAMC News
7:23 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Powerful Storms Sweep Region

Credit PSNH News/Flickr

Powerful storms rolled through the Albany, New York area last night flooding streets, downing trees and closing roads. Power crews are expected to restore power this morning to over 24 thousand National Grid, Central Hudson and NYSEG customers.

Albany-based National Weather Service meteorologist Ian Lee says a storm system Wednesday evening produced wide-spread damage throughout much of the Mohawk River Valley and into the greater capitol district.

Lee says the storm moved even further east, passing into western Massachusetts and southern Vermont.

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Around the Nation
7:21 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Missing Senior Citizen Comes Home In Time For TV Deadline

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 8:19 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

A television news crew in Maine was reporting a story about a man who had gone missing. Seventy-three-year-old Robert McDonough suffers from dementia and had not been seen for more than 14 hours. As the TV reporter prepared to go live, standing outside McDonough's home, an elderly man wandered into the camera shot. The reporter said hello, then did a double take. Robert McDonough had returned home, safe and sound, just in time for the newscast.

weather
6:56 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Meteorologist Jason Caterina's Forecast

Newschannel 13's Meteorologist Jason Caterina gives the WAMC Morning Edition Forecast.

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Animals
6:03 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Scientists Say Species Is Earliest Known Bird

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 8:19 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

You know what they say about the early bird? Well, a new species is vying for that title. Scientists have long-regarded an ancient creature, known as the Archaeopteryx, as the earliest bird known to science. But a discovery made in China could change that, according to a study published in Nature magazine. Scientists have found evidence of a feathered, chicken-sized species that's 10 million years older. It's called Aurornis xui, and it lived about 160 million years ago.

NPR Story
5:58 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Blackhawks Beat Wings, Will Meet Kings In NHL Conference Final

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 8:18 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

As nail-biting hockey fans know well, there has been a lot of drama in this year's playoffs. Last night in the NHL, no different. The Chicago Blackhawks advanced to the semifinals with a thrilling Game 7 overtime win over the Detroit Red Wings.

Chicago had the best regular season record in the NHL this year. But as NPR's Mike Pesca reports, that doesn't mean much when your back is against the wall in an elimination game.

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NPR Story
5:58 am
Thu May 30, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 8:19 am

Amazon asked subscribers of its video-streaming service to do the jobs usually left to focus groups and executives. The company released 14 pilot TV shows, then looked at customer reviews and view counts. Amazon announced five pilots have been approved for a full season.

The Salt
3:07 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Will Chinese Firm Bring Home The Bacon With Smithfield Deal?

Smithfield Foods, makers of ham products under a variety of brand names, is being purchased by Chinese food maker Shuanghui International for $4.72 billion.
AP

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 9:38 am

There were questions Wednesday about whether U.S. regulators will approve the takeover of Smithfield Foods Inc., the company that sells all-American hams, hot dogs and bacon, by China's Shuanghui International.

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The Salt
3:05 am
Thu May 30, 2013

GMO Wheat Found In Oregon Field. How Did It Get There?

Genetically modified wheat has been discovered growing in a field in Oregon. GMO wheat is not approved for sale in the U.S. Above, a wheat field in Arkansas.
Danny Johnston AP

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 2:03 pm

A farmer in Oregon has found some genetically engineered wheat growing on his land. It's an unwelcome surprise, because this type of wheat has never been approved for commercial planting.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture says it's investigating, trying to find out how this wheat got there. The USDA says there's no risk to public health, but wheat exporters are worried about how their customers in Asia and Europe will react.

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Parallels
3:05 am
Thu May 30, 2013

Years Of Combat Experience, And Just Turning 20

Luis Bedoya is baby-faced and skinny.

And he looks ever the boy when he puts on an industrial-sized apron, thick gloves and a metal helmet - the tools of an apprentice welder at the Don Bosco center in this city in southern Colombia.

It's a big complex, complete with classrooms, basketball courts, a dormitory and work rooms. It's home to boys and girls, as well as very young adults, who defected from the FARC rebels or were captured by the Colombian army.

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