Morning Edition

Weekdays, 5am - 9am
  • Hosted by Steve Inskeep, Renee Montagne and David Greene
  • Local Host David Guistina

For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

5:05 - StarDate
6:20 & 7:20 - WAMC Sports
6:49:35 - Paul Caiano's Weather
7:304 - Academic Minute
7:45 - Alan Chartock’s morning commentary
7:51 - Marketplace
8:44:30 - Writer's Almanac
8:51 - Marketplace

NPR Newscasts will now be at 19 minutes and 42 minutes past the hour.

In Brussels on Thursday, EU leaders will discuss stronger sanctions against Russia. Juan Zarate, a senior adviser at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, talks about their options.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Michael Smith, of Norridgewock, Maine, has a really convincing tattoo of a handgun on his lower stomach. This week, he woke up to a crew cutting trees outside. He marched out to tell them to stop with his shirt off. A bit later he woke up again, to a SWAT team with rifles trained. The tree cutters had mistaken his tattoo for a real gun tucked in his belt.

Smith told the police, quote, "I got plans today. I don't want to get shot." He was not charged.

A Chinese property developer has reportedly paid close to $2 million for a golden-haired Tibetan mastiff puppy. The lion-looking dogs have become a status symbol for China's very rich.

Host David Greene gets the latest from NPR's Frank Langfitt about the potential debris from Malaysia Flight 370 spotted by satellite imagery in the southern Indian Ocean.

David Wessel of the Brookings Institution talks about Janet Yellen's first policy meeting and press conference since taking over as chairwoman of the Federal Reserve.

Crimea is a poor region, heavily subsidized by Kiev, and gets all its gas, water and food from Ukraine. Russia doesn't even have a land link with the Crimean peninsula and absorbing it will affect banks, schools, tourism and pensions for residents.

The Justice Department announced Wednesday that it has reached a billion-dollar agreement with Toyota, settling a federal probe into the company's handling of a recall for faulty gas pedals.

Assisted Suicide Bill Stalls In Massachusetts

Mar 19, 2014

Supporters of legislation that would allow terminally ill, mentally competent adults the right to self-administer life-ending drugs say the bill has stalled on Beacon Hill.

NY Voting Rights Consortium Calls For Special Elections

Mar 19, 2014

Advocates who want special elections to be held for 12 vacant seats in the New York state Legislature say minority communities are being deprived of proper representation.

My colleagues and I drove 2,428 miles and remained in the same place.

We gathered a team, rented a car, checked the batteries in our recorders and cameras. We moved from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean. We crossed deserts, plains and mountains. But all the while, we were living in Borderland — zigzagging across the frontier between Mexico and the United States.

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