Morning Edition

Weekdays, 5am - 9am

For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Its cast of regulars includes some of the most familiar voices on radio: correspondent Susan Stamberg; commentator Frank Deford; news analysts Cokie Roberts and Juan Williams; and newscasters Jean Cochran and Carl Kasell.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

5:06 - StarDate
6:53 - Paul Caiano's Weather
7:34 - Academic Minute
7:50 - Marketplace
8:35 - Writer's Almanac
8:50 - Marketplace

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187ee52e1c8156e5bf7705e|5187edcfe1c8156e5bf76f38

Pages

Business
6:29 am
Fri April 5, 2013

The Ups And Downs Of Cyber Currency Bitcoin

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 7:30 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Bitcoin is a virtual currency that's traded largely online. It was created in 2009 in the aftermath of the global financial crisis as an alternative to currencies which are controlled by countries and central bankers. But Bitcoin has been on a wild ride lately, soaring in value during the anxious days of the Cyprus banking crisis.

We're going to look at the currency's history in today's Business Bottom Line. Here's NPR's Steve Henn.

Read more
Business
5:11 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 7:30 am

The computer maker's chairman Ray Lane has stepped down as executive chairman. He's been on thin ice with shareholders after his role in acquiring a business software company ended up hurting HP's bottom line.

Middle East
5:11 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Talks Over Iran's Nuclear Program Resume In Kazakhstan

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 7:30 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

We have been hearing a lot about North Korea and nuclear weapons lately. Well, nuclear negotiators have just wrapped up a first day of talks on Iran's nuclear program. Tehran does not have nuclear weapons and insists it doesn't want them, but six world powers say the country must do more to assure the world that its program is entirely peaceful. We spoke earlier with NPR's Peter Kenyon, who is in Almaty, Kazakhstan for the talks. Peter, good morning.

PETER KENYON, BYLINE: Good morning, David.

Read more
Law
4:09 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Without Reviews, Inmates Can Get Lost In U.S. Prison System

Stephen Slevin, who spent more than 22 months in solitary confinement despite not being convicted of a crime, is seen here in Dona Ana County Sheriff's Department photos, before and after his time in solitary.
AP

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 9:16 pm

Every year 10 million people funnel in and out of America's jails and prisons. And every year some of them get lost. Recently there have been two high-profile cases of such inmates — one who got out years too early, and one who stayed years too long. Both had disastrous consequences.

In January, Evan Ebel walked out of a Colorado prison four years too early. Two months later, he allegedly rang the doorbell of Tom Clements, the head of the Colorado Department of Corrections, shot him in the chest and killed him. Ebel was shot and killed by police two days later.

Read more
Arts & Life
3:28 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Jewishness On Display: 'Truth' By Way Of Discomfort

Bill Glucroft, an American Jew living in Berlin, chats with visitors from his box in the most controversial portion of the Berlin Jewish Museum's exhibition "The Whole Truth."
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 9:16 pm

In Berlin's Jewish Museum, a new exhibit called "The Whole Truth" asks visitors uncomfortable and even absurd questions about Jews. One of the curators, Michal Friedlander, says it is intentionally provocative.

"The point is to get people talking about how they perceive Jews, particularly in Germany today," she says.

But some German Jews accuse the museum of going too far.

Read more
Television
3:27 am
Fri April 5, 2013

As Audiences Shift To Cable, TV Programming Changes, Too

In recent years, high-profile cable TV dramas like AMC's Mad Men have helped to shift audiences and programming across all types of TV networks. (Pictured, from left: John Slattery, Jon Hamm and Vincent Kartheiser)
Michael Yarish / AMC

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 1:20 pm

Mad Men comes back for its sixth season Sunday at an opportune moment for basic cable. Last weekend, 25 million viewers combined watched The Bible and The Walking Dead on basic cable channels. That's more than triple the audience for The Good Wife on CBS that same night.

Read more
It's All Politics
3:16 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Sequester Scorecard: A Month Later, Effects Still Up In Air

The U.S. Navy's Blue Angels soar over the Florida Keys during a March 23 air show. The group has canceled several air shows in April and May, reportedly owing to budget cuts.
Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 10:09 am

Automatic federal budget cuts that kicked in March 1 have had little initial impact in many parts of the government. For a few programs, however, the effect has been real and painful, as the government begins cutting $85 billion from its spending through the end of September.

Many of the earliest signs of the cuts are being seen on the local level, in state programs like education that rely in part on federal dollars.

Read more
StoryCorps
12:32 am
Fri April 5, 2013

Drafted To Fight For The Country That Hurt Him

Ruben Aguilar (right), 85, spoke with his friend Bill Luna, 77, about being deported to Mexico at age 6: "I grew up when that happened. From 6 years old, all of a sudden I felt like I was 15."
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 10:49 am

Ruben Aguilar, 85, was forcibly deported from the U.S. 80 years ago as part of a largely forgotten Mexican repatriation program run by the American government.

During the Great Depression, hundreds of thousands of people of Mexican descent were forcibly deported to Mexico without due process, including many American citizens. Aguilar, an American citizen, was born in Chicago but was deported with his parents, who were undocumented. At the time, he was 6 years old.

Read more
Hudson Valley News
8:06 am
Thu April 4, 2013

Maloney pushes dam safety legislation

Credit public-domain-image.com

NEWBURGH – There are 400 dams in New York State that are classified as high-hazard and 100 of them are in Congressman Sean Patrick Maloney’s 18th District in Putnam, Westchester, Orange and Dutchess counties.

The freshman Democrat announced on Wednesday that he would introduce legislation next week to provide a new national dam safety program; the previous one expired in 2011.

Read more
Hudson Valley News
7:44 am
Thu April 4, 2013

North Korean threats ‘very concerning,’ says Gibson

Credit wikipedia commons

WASHINGTON – Threats of attack by North Korea on the US and its allies is “very concerning” to Congressman Christopher Gibson (R-NY19).

The House member said on Wednesday that the administration in Washington is taking the “proper steps” in preparation of any action by the North Koreans.

Read more

Pages