Morning Edition

Weekdays, 5am - 9am

For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Its cast of regulars includes some of the most familiar voices on radio: correspondent Susan Stamberg; commentator Frank Deford; news analysts Cokie Roberts and Juan Williams; and newscasters Jean Cochran and Carl Kasell.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Remembrances
5:26 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Pakistani Advocate For The Poor Slain By Gunmen

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 9:34 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Gunmen killed a woman in Pakistan yesterday. The news stories about this were formulaic for Pakistan, she was killed in a customary manner by assassins on motorcycles who rolled away with impunity. What's remarkable is the way she lived. Parveen Rehman came from Karachi, one of the world's largest cities. She helped thousands of poor people obtain basic services.

When I first met her in 2008, she told me she studied to become an architect, but doubted the value of the upscale buildings she learned to design.

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Around the Nation
5:26 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Fla. Lieutenant Governor Resigns Amid Probe Of Internet Cafe

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 9:34 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Florida, an investigation into storefront Internet gambling parlors has forced the resignation of one top elected official. Lieutenant Governor Jennifer Carroll is stepping down because of her involvement with a group called Allied Veterans of the World. That group runs dozens of storefront operations where people gamble using electronic slot machines. More than 50 people have been arrested.

And as NPR's Greg Allen reports from Miami, the investigation is sending shockwaves through Florida politics.

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Business
5:26 am
Thu March 14, 2013

GM's Archive Offers Glimpse Of Its Past And Future

Cars at the GM Heritage Center in Sterling Heights, Mich., include a 1951 Le Sabre concept, at left.
General Motors

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 1:12 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's consider a company, now, that's had lots of ups and downs - General Motors. Most of GM's history is in the form of cars, and that history is housed in a nondescript warehouse in a suburb of Detroit. It's called the GM Heritage Center. Not open to the public, it's an automotive archive.

NPR's Sonari Glinton got a tour.

SONARI GLINTON, BYLINE: There's probably no better job for a car nut than to be in charge of a vast auto archive for one of the biggest and oldest car companies.

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The Papal Succession
5:26 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Election Of Pope Francis Could Signal New Start For Church

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 9:34 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Not since the early centuries of the Roman Catholic Church has a pope come from outside Europe.

MONTAGNE: Pope Francis, the first pontiff ever to take that name, comes from Argentina. It's part of the zone commonly described as the Global South, regions that include sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America, now home to hundreds of millions of Catholics.

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Politics
5:26 am
Thu March 14, 2013

Controversies Over CPAC Reflect GOP's Woes

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 9:34 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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It's All Politics
3:56 am
Thu March 14, 2013

It's Still Early, But GOP Hopefuls Test The Waters For 2016

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, considered a possible Republican presidential candidate in 2016, was not invited to speak at CPAC.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 9:34 am

During the annual Conservative Political Action Conference that begins Thursday, a slew of men who appear to want to try their hand at leading the GOP back to the White House in 2016 will be speaking, though not every potential presidential candidate was invited.

Yes, it's four years away, but that hasn't stopped Republican hopefuls from testing the waters. There are already polls — for whatever they're worth — of potential GOP candidates.

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Working Late: Older Americans On The Job
3:55 am
Thu March 14, 2013

A Retired Chicago Cop's Second Act Is At A Barbershop

Richard Piña, 69, with customer Augustin Bustos at Rich's Den barbershop in Calumet City, Ill. Piña, who retired from the Chicago police force 12 years ago, works at his shop four or five hours a day.
Beth Rooney for NPR

Originally published on Thu March 14, 2013 8:43 pm

Increasingly, people are continuing to work past 65. Almost a third of Americans between the ages of 65 and 70 are working, and among those older than 75, about 7 percent are still on the job. In Working Late, a series for Morning Edition, NPR profiles older adults who are still in the workforce.

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Music Interviews
2:51 am
Thu March 14, 2013

At South By Southwest, A 71-Year-Old Guitarist Makes A Belated Debut

At age 71, nearly 50 years after his first album, guitarist Harry Taussig is releasing a follow-up — and making his concert debut at South by Southwest.
Jacob Margolis for NPR

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 12:42 pm

This week, about 2,000 bands from around the world are performing at various venues throughout Austin, Texas, for the South by Southwest music festival. Many of the musicians are young and have had plenty of experience performing in public.

And then there's guitarist Harry Taussig, who is nearly 72 years old. On Thursday, he'll be performing live for the first time ever.

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New York News
8:45 am
Wed March 13, 2013

NY state plans for $1.7 billion in Sandy funds

Credit U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Northeast Region

New York  Governor Andrew Cuomo has proposed a plan for the use of $1.7 billion in federal storm-damage funds.

Most of the money is going to homeowners and businesses hardest hit by Superstorm Sandy. But some will be used for damage from the storms Irene and Lee.

The money will be used around the state, including on Long Island. The exception is New York City, which has a separate allocation.

Nearly $260 million will be used to reduce the risk of future damage. Over $170 million will cover voluntary buyouts to residents in flood areas.

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Sports
8:16 am
Wed March 13, 2013

WAMC Morning Edition Sports Update

Credit Keith Allison Flickr

In the NBA, Miami picked up their 19th straight win as Dwyane Wade scored 23 points in a wire-to-wire victory over Atlanta 98-81. LeBron James chipped in 15 points.

The winning streak ties the fifth-longest in NBA history.

Brook Lopez contributed 26 points and Brooklyn defeated New Orleans 108-98. Deron Williams had 21 points and 13 assists as the Nets won for the fourth time in five games.

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