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Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In a ruling that could echo far beyond the Netherlands, a Dutch court has sided with an environmental group and said the government must cut carbon emissions by 25 percent in five years in order to protect the country's citizens.

Many other environmental groups and governments have paid close attention to the Dutch case, and there are similar ones in the works in other countries, including Belgium and Norway.

WAMC's Dr. Alan Chartock discusses Wikileaks on NSA spying on the last three French presidents and the New York State legislative session deals.

Pat Bradley/WAMC

The investigation into the two escaped inmates from Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora has shifted focus to a second prison employee. The subject of the focus is a correction officer who may have provided pliers or other hand tools to the convicts, Richard Matt and David Sweat. The Times Union reports that the officer, Gene Palmer, has been placed on administrative leave as investigators look into whether the officer might have been duped into providing the tools or knowingly assisted the convicts. Palmer could face charges of promoting prison contraband or facilitating the escape.

Meanwhile Clinton County District Attorney Andrew Wylie told NBC that Joyce Mitchell, a prison employee who has been charged with assisting the inmates, smuggled tools into the prison in hamburger meat. 

Cat Scares Black Bear Off Porch In Alaska

Jun 24, 2015
Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

WAMC's David Guistina talks with Judy Patrick of the Daily Gazette about the cities of Albany, Schenectady and Troy being selected by Bloomberg Philanthropies for a $1 million grant to light up vacant homes in order to market them for rehabilitation.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NASCAR:

NASCAR has issued a statement backing South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley's call to remove the Confederate flag from the Statehouse grounds in the wake of the Charleston church massacre last week. The statement was released as South Carolina lawmakers agreed to discuss removing the flag, and one day after Haley said "the time has come" to take it down. NASCAR says it is continuing its long-standing policy to disallow the use of the Confederate Flag symbol in any official capacity.

NFL:

Tom Brady and NFL commissioner Roger Goodell have concluded a 10-hour hearing as the New England Patriots quarterback appealed his four-game suspension. Brady was punished by the league for his role in the use of deflated footballs in the AFC championship game win over Indianapolis. Brady's attorney felt their side put in a very compelling case and added that no timetable on a decision by Goodell had been given.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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