Morning Edition

Weekdays, 5am - 9am

For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Its cast of regulars includes some of the most familiar voices on radio: correspondent Susan Stamberg; commentator Frank Deford; news analysts Cokie Roberts and Juan Williams; and newscasters Jean Cochran and Carl Kasell.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

5:06 - StarDate
6:53 - Paul Caiano's Weather
7:34 - Academic Minute
7:50 - Marketplace
8:35 - Writer's Almanac
8:50 - Marketplace

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187ee52e1c8156e5bf7705e|5187edcfe1c8156e5bf76f38

Pages

Religion
10:16 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Papal Succession Process Differs For Resignation Vs. Death

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 11:41 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. With Steve Inskeep, I'm Renee Montagne.

Read more
Religion
9:44 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Pope's Resignation News Pauses Runup To Obama's Speech

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 11:41 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And this is the day of the week when we normally talk to our MORNING EDITION contributor Cokie Roberts about politics. This morning, though, politics and the runup to the president's State of the Union Address tomorrow have been overshadowed by the news out of Rome.

So we've asked Cokie, a longtime Vatican watcher, to weigh in on the announcement that Pope Benedict is resigning at the end of this month.

And good morning, Cokie.

Read more
Religion
9:31 am
Mon February 11, 2013

After Pope's Resignation, What's Next For The Church?

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 11:41 am

Pope Benedict XVI announced Monday that he will resign on Feb. 28. For more on what his resignation means for the future of the Vatican leadership, Steve Inskeep talks with Mathew Schmalz, a professor of religious studies at College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Mass.

Around the Nation
7:34 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Romance Can Be Tricky For Fortune Cookie Messages

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 11:41 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
7:26 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Blizzard Conditions Don't Stop Happy Events

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 11:41 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep with tales of the New England blizzard. Donna Ambrosia went into labor in Norwich, Connecticut. She inched toward the hospital in an ambulance behind a snowplow and the baby was born in the parking lot. In Portland, Maine, Karen Willis and Greg Beal went ahead with their wedding. Some guests didn't make it, but the bride says it's like the blizzard before her parents married, and the groom declared: Weather be damned, it's been a great day.

Religion
7:17 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Vatican 'Surprised' By Pope's Resignation Announcement

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 11:41 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Within the last hour, we have heard that Pope Benedict is resigning at the end of this month. A Vatican spokesman said the pope's announcement, quote, "took us by surprise," suggesting that even the pontiff's closest aides did not know what he was about to do. The last pope to resign was Gregory XII, in 1415.

Read more
Religion
7:00 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Pope Benedict XVI To Resign Feb. 28

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 11:41 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Surprising news this morning from the Vatican. Pope Benedict XVI has announced he is resigning at the end of this month. It is an unprecedented departure in modern times. The last time a pope stepped down, it was 1415, the Middle Ages. At 85 years old, Benedict said he was no longer up to the physical demands of the papacy. We've got NPR's Sylvia Poggioli on the line now live from Rome. Good morning.

Read more
weather
6:58 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Meteorologist Paul Caiano's Forecast

Credit WNYT

Newschannel 13's Meteorologist Paul Caiano gives the WAMC Morning Edition forecast.

Read more
Sports
5:53 am
Mon February 11, 2013

WAMC Morning Edition Sports Update

Credit Gennaro Masi Flickr

The Boston Celtics continued their amazing run since the season-ending knee injury to point guard Rajon Rondo by winning their seventh straight game, a 118-114 triple-overtime thriller over Denver. That ended the Nuggets' nine-game win streak.

Paul Pierce led the way with 27 points, 14 rebounds and 14 assists. Pierce made a tying 3-pointer in the second overtime to make it 107-107 and extend the game. Kevin Garnett had 20 points and grabbed 18 rebounds. Jason Terry scored a season-high 26 points off the bench.

The Celtics are 7 and 0 since Rondo went down.

Read more
National Security
5:26 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Pentagon Goes On The Offensive Against Cyber Attacks

Homeland Security analysts watch for threats to U.S. technological infrastructure at the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 6:38 pm

With the Pentagon now officially recognizing cyberspace as a domain of warfare, U.S. military commanders are emphasizing their readiness to defend the nation against cyberthreats from abroad. What they do not say is that they are equally prepared to launch their own cyberattacks against U.S. adversaries.

Read more

Pages