Morning Edition

Weekdays, 5am - 9am

For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Its cast of regulars includes some of the most familiar voices on radio: correspondent Susan Stamberg; commentator Frank Deford; news analysts Cokie Roberts and Juan Williams; and newscasters Jean Cochran and Carl Kasell.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

5:06 - StarDate
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7:34 - Academic Minute
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8:35 - Writer's Almanac
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WAMC News
7:38 am
Thu November 15, 2012

Dr. Alan Chartock's morning commentary

WAMC's David Guistina speaks with political observer Alan Chartock about the president's Tuesday press conference.

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Hudson Valley News
7:31 am
Thu November 15, 2012

Faith leaders call for fracking ban

A group of Hudson Valley faith leaders gathered in New Paltz Wednesday at an event called A Spiritual Call to Ban Fracking. Hudson Valley Correspondent Hank Gross reports.

Fracking is a “crime,” according to Tom Caplan, a member of the Zen Mountain Monastery in Mount Tremper, who expressed his own feeling about the process.

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WAMC News
6:47 am
Thu November 15, 2012

Morning weather with WNYT's Paul Caiano

Paul Caiano
Credit WNYT

Newschannel 13 Meteorologist Paul Caiano delivers his WAMC regional weather forecast.

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NPR Story
4:46 am
Thu November 15, 2012

Scandal Shines A Light On Tampa Social Scene

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 5:29 am

Along with the news about the Gen. David Petreus scandal, we've been hearing about lavish social events given in the Tampa, Fla., area. A lot of military brass from MacDill Air Force Base, where U.S. Central Command is headquartered, go to these events. Linda Wertheimer talks to Ben Montgomery, a reporter with the Tampa Bay Times, about how the scandal is playing out around Tampa.

NPR Story
4:46 am
Thu November 15, 2012

Studies Vary On How Many Jobs Will Be Lost If Taxes On The Wealthy Ride

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 7:07 am

Republicans claim President Obama's plan to raise taxes on the wealthy will cost the economy 700,000 jobs. Another study from the Congressional Budget Office puts the number of lost jobs as 200,000. But both studies also assume millions of new jobs will be created.

Politics
4:05 am
Thu November 15, 2012

Obama's Visit To Myanmar: Too Much, Too Soon?

A newspaper with a front-page photo of President Obama is displayed at a press house in downtown Yangon, Myanmar, on Thursday, ahead of Obama's visit.
Soe Than Win AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 8:15 pm

When President Obama sets off to Asia this weekend to highlight his so-called pivot to the region, he will make a bit of history: Obama will become the first sitting U.S. president to visit Myanmar.

The country, also known as Burma, was a pariah state for decades, ruled by a ruthless military dictatorship. That is changing, and the Obama administration has encouraged a dramatic reform process in the country. But it may be too early for a victory lap.

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Planet Money
4:04 am
Thu November 15, 2012

Why Coke Cost A Nickel For 70 Years

An oilcloth sign advertising Coca-Cola from 1905.
The Coca-Cola Company

Originally published on Mon November 19, 2012 2:04 pm

Prices change; that's fundamental to how economies work.

And yet: In 1886, a bottle of Coke cost a nickel. It was also a nickel in 1900, 1915 and 1930. In fact, 70 years after the first Coke was sold, you could still buy a bottle for a nickel.

Three wars, the Great Depression, hundreds of competitors — none of it made any difference for the price of Coke. Why not?

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Hudson Valley News
7:57 am
Wed November 14, 2012

Zimpher eyes SUNY, manufacturing link

SUNY Chancellor Nancy Zimpher

SUNY Chancellor Nancy Zimpher wants the Hudson Valley manufacturing industry and the college system to get on the same page when it comes to preparing students for jobs in their industry. Hudson Valley Correspondent Hank Gross has more on Zimpher’s address to the Council of Industry on Tuesday. 

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Around the Nation
7:35 am
Wed November 14, 2012

Airline Strips Cello Of Frequent Flyer Miles

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 8:06 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
7:31 am
Wed November 14, 2012

Police Pick Up Car Thief Turned Delivery Man

Originally published on Wed November 14, 2012 8:06 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. A driver delivering takeout for a Chinese restaurant left his car running while he ran in an order. He comes back and guess what? No car. He called his boss, who called the next customer on the route to apologize. But they had their takeout. The car thief-turned delivery man made a few extra bucks. But at the next house on his route the cops were waiting. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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