Morning Edition

Weekdays, 5am - 9am

For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Its cast of regulars includes some of the most familiar voices on radio: correspondent Susan Stamberg; commentator Frank Deford; news analysts Cokie Roberts and Juan Williams; and newscasters Jean Cochran and Carl Kasell.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

5:06 - StarDate
6:53 - Paul Caiano's Weather
7:34 - Academic Minute
7:50 - Marketplace
8:35 - Writer's Almanac
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Hudson Valley News
7:45 am
Wed October 31, 2012

Central Hudson Makes Progress On First Day of Restoration

Steady progress was made Tuesday in repairing damage to Central Hudson’s electric system in the wake of severe winds delivered by Tropical Storm Sandy.

By 8 p.m., power was restored to more than 50,000, or nearly half of all impacted customers, and crews worked throughout the night.

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WAMC News
7:21 am
Wed October 31, 2012

Sandy's Hardest Hit Still Assessing Infrastructure and Transportation Damage

Credit AP

State and federal officials, utility companies, and transportation service providers knew the recovery from Hurricane Sandy would be a long, uphill battle across the Northeast. Here's an update on the status of recovery services and transportation in some of the hardest hit areas:

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Sports
7:12 am
Wed October 31, 2012

Heat Smoke Celtics in NBA Opener, Knicks-Nets Game Uncertain, Golden Gloves

Ray Allen had 19 points in his first game with the Heat against his former Celtics in the NBA season opener
Credit Wilfredo Lee / AP

The Miami Heat got their NBA championship rings, and then went out and played like champions. Dwayne Wade scored 29 points and the NBA champion Miami Heat beat the Boston Celtics 120-107 in their season opener. LeBron James scored 26 points and grabbed 10 rebounds while missing much of the second half with leg cramps. Ray Allen, in his first game with Miami since leaving Boston over the summer, added 19 points for the Heat. Chris Bosh also had 19. Paul Pierce scored 23 points to lead Boston.

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WAMC News
7:07 am
Wed October 31, 2012

Morning Weather with WNYT's Paul Caiano

Credit WNYT

WNYT's Paul Caiano delivers his morning forecast. 

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WAMC News
7:00 am
Wed October 31, 2012

Morning Headlines with Judy Patrick

Judy Patrick, Editor of the Daily Gazette, talks with David Guistina about the morning's top headlines. 

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Around the Nation
6:47 am
Wed October 31, 2012

Stranded In Hawaii By Sandy, Travelers Wait

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Hurricane Sandy disrupted flights all across the United States. Even people far from the storm discovered planes could not get to their airports. And of all the people affected, the saddest were surely 1,300 people from the East Coast stuck in Honolulu.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

What a shame.

Games & Humor
6:45 am
Wed October 31, 2012

Zombie Pumpkin Carving Gives Viewers The Shivers

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 8:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with news of jack-o-lantern art this Halloween. Ray Villafane is a former teacher who found his medium after carving a gourd a student gave him. The sculptor began with a pumpkin, this year, weighing just under a ton to create a vividly realistic life-sized, stringy-haired orange zombie pulling other zombies out of a pumpkin garden. The work of pumpkin art is now giving people the shivers at the New York Botanical Garden. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

All Tech Considered
4:26 am
Wed October 31, 2012

The Night A Computer Predicted The Next President

Walter Cronkite (right) listens as Dr. J. Presper Eckert (center) describes the functions of the UNIVAC I computer he helped develop in the early 1950s.
AP

Originally published on Thu November 1, 2012 1:55 am

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Election 2012
4:25 am
Wed October 31, 2012

Sandy Underscores Debate Over Government's Role

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 1:09 pm

President Obama offered thoughts and prayers Tuesday for all those who have been affected by Sandy. He also offered something more tangible: the full resources of the federal government.

"The most important message I have for them is that America's with you," he said. "We are standing behind you, and we are going to do everything we can to help you get back on your feet."

For Obama, the federal government is a critical vehicle for that kind of help. Republicans put more faith in local government, and even voluntary efforts.

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Law
4:25 am
Wed October 31, 2012

Can Drug-Sniffing Dog Prompt Home Search?

Miami-Dade narcotics detector canine Franky, who came out of retirement to give a demonstration, sniffs marijuana in Miami in 2011. Franky's supersensitive nose is at the heart of a question being put to the U.S. Supreme Court: Does a police K-9's sniff outside a house give officers the right to get a search warrant for illegal drugs?
Alan Diaz AP

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 8:52 am

You can already hear all the likely jokes at the Supreme Court, about the justices going to the dogs. But the issue being argued Wednesday is deadly serious: whether police can take a trained drug-detection dog up to a house to smell for drugs inside, and if the dog alerts, use that to justify a search of the home.

In the case before the court, the four-legged cop was named Franky, and as a result of his nose, his human police partner charged Joelis Jardines with trafficking in more than 25 pounds of marijuana.

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