Morning Edition

Weekdays, 5am - 9am

For nearly three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 14 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 660 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

Its cast of regulars includes some of the most familiar voices on radio: correspondent Susan Stamberg; commentator Frank Deford; news analysts Cokie Roberts and Juan Williams; and newscasters Jean Cochran and Carl Kasell.

Produced by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based in 17 countries around the world, and producers and reporters in 17 locations in the U.S. Their reporting is supplemented by NPR member station reporters across the country and a strong corps of independent producers and reporters in the public radio system.

Since its debut in 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors — including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

5:06 - StarDate
6:53 - Paul Caiano's Weather
7:34 - Academic Minute
7:50 - Marketplace
8:35 - Writer's Almanac
8:50 - Marketplace

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5187ee52e1c8156e5bf7705e|5187edcfe1c8156e5bf76f38

Pages

Science
3:28 am
Thu October 11, 2012

Software Calculates City-Specific Carbon Footprint

Bedrich Benes and Michel Abdul-Massih

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 3:58 pm

Read more
Media
3:27 am
Thu October 11, 2012

Advice For Moderators: Keep Order, Out Of Spotlight

Moderator Jim Lehrer gestures before the presidential debate at the University of Denver last week. Moderators must finagle answers out of sometimes-dodgy politicians and keep control, all without seeming to get in the way.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 7:58 am

PBS' Jim Lehrer came in for widespread criticism last week for failing to control the first presidential debate. Now, moderator Martha Raddatz is confronting partisan criticism in the lead-up to Thursday night's vice presidential debate, the first and only direct confrontation between Republican Paul Ryan and Democrat Joe Biden.

Read more
Asia
7:42 am
Wed October 10, 2012

Taiwan Asks Apple Maps To Blur Radar Station

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

WAMC News
7:41 am
Wed October 10, 2012

Morning Weather with WNYT's Paul Caiano

WNYT's Paul Caiano delivers his morning forecast. 

Science
7:35 am
Wed October 10, 2012

Nobel Prize Winner Proves Teacher Wrong

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. It was the sort of report card that could crush a budding young talent. In 1949, a teacher at Eton belittled John Gurdon's dreams of becoming a scientist as quite ridiculous. If he can't learn simple biological facts, the teacher sniffed, pursuing science would be a waste of time. Gurdon eventually did go on to study zoology. And this week his breakthrough in reprogramming cells received the Nobel Prize for Medicine. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Asia
6:50 am
Wed October 10, 2012

Pakistani Girl Activist Wounded In Taliban Attack

Originally published on Wed October 10, 2012 9:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This week has brought one of the most disturbing images to emerge from years of conflict, in Pakistan. A 15-year-old girl lies in a hospital bed, with a bullet wound in her head. This is her punishment. She had the courage to demand the right for girls to get an education, and because she criticized violent Islamist militants who aim to stop girls, like her, from doing that. From Islamabad, NPR's Philip Reeves reports.

Read more
Elections
6:18 am
Wed October 10, 2012

Hayworth, Maloney Spar Over Environmental Issues

The status of the Indian Point nuclear power plant was one of many points of contention between the two candidates
Hank Gross

Congressional incumbent Nan Hayworth and challenger Sean Patrick Maloney addressed environmental issues Tuesday night at a forum in Westchester County.

The event was held by New York League of Conservation Voters, featured questions from the audience and from panel members representing Riverkeeper, the National League of Conservation Voters, and Scenic Hudson. 

Read more
Hudson Valley News
6:16 am
Wed October 10, 2012

Complete Repairs to Newburgh’s Broken Sewer Line Could Costs $7 Million

The broken sewer main that dumped between three million and five million gallons of raw sewage into the Quassaick Creek that feeds the Hudson River late last week, could wind up costing the City of Newburgh as much as $7 million once all of the repairs and old pipes have been replaced.

The temporary fix, which was completed Friday night with a temporary pipe installed to continue the service, will cost an estimated $1 million.

Read more
Elections
6:10 am
Wed October 10, 2012

MA Senate Candidates Gear Up for 3rd Debate

AP

 Republican U.S. Sen. Scott Brown and his Democratic challenger Elizabeth Warren are set to square off for their third debate in Massachusetts' U.S. Senate race.

The debate takes place at Springfield Symphony Hall at 7 p.m. It's the only debate in the western part of the state.

The face-off comes a day after Brown received the endorsement of former Republican New Jersey Gov. Christine Todd Whitman and Warren met with construction workers at a Boston work site.

As the candidates gear up, outside groups are, too, hoping to affect the outcome of the high-profile race.

Read more
Elections
6:08 am
Wed October 10, 2012

Burlington, VT Sends Out New City Ballots After Error

WAMC

The Vermont city of Burlington has mailed corrected city election ballots to 523 voters who had asked for absentee ballots or voted early at City Hall.

Votes on any city ballot that is gray will not be counted. Those ballots contained an error. The city says the new corrected ballots are either ivory, salmon or cherry colored.

Voters who have already returned their gray city ballot must vote again with a new ballot if they want their vote to count.

The error does not affect general election federal or state ballots.

 

Pages