The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, listener call-ins, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you have any questions or you'd like to be on the show, email us at roundtable@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

8/26/15 Panel

Aug 26, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Rolling Stone article mentioned during today's panel:
LGBT Catholics Disappointed on Eve of 'Liberal' Pope's U.S. Visit

Enrico Spada

  An imagined version of true events, Red Velvet is the story of Ira Aldridge, the first African-American actor to play Othello on the English stage in 1833. In the story lines are blurred between race, friendship, betrayal and art.

The powerful play is currently running at Shakespeare & Company in Lenox, MA and stars OBIE Award-winning actor John Douglas Thompson as Ira Aldridge. 

Red Velvet was written by Lolita Chakrabarti and directed at Shakespeare & Company by Daniela Varon.

  In his new book Billion-Dollar Ball: A Journey Through the Big-Money Culture of College Football, journalist Gilbert Gaul examines how – he says - college football has come to dominate some of our best, most prestigious universities—reframing campus values, distorting academic missions, and transforming athletic departments into astonishingly rich entertainment factories, even as many university presidents look the other way.

Gaul argues these abuses are mere symbols of something much larger and problematic: the business model that schools have created using football to brand their schools, monetizing every aspect of the game.

Gilbert Gaul twice won the Pulitzer Prize and has been shortlisted for the Pulitzer four other times. For more than thirty-five years, he worked as an investigative journalist for The Washington Post, Philadelphia Inquirer and other newspapers.

  An American flag flies in Havana once again.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Representative Jim McGovern tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock about his recent trip to Cuba.

  This week, Albany Civic Theater opens a production of Patrick Hamilton’s suspenseful drama, Angel Street.

Angel Street tells the story of the Manninghams who live on Angel Street in 19th Century London. As the curtain rises, all appears the essence of Victorian tranquility. It is soon apparent however, that Mr. Manningham, a suavely handsome man, is slowly, intentionally, driving his devoted wife, Bella, to the brink of insanity.

Inspector Rough from Scotland Yard is convinced that Manningham is a homicidal maniac.

Gradually the inspector restores Bella's confidence in herself and as the evidence against Manningham unfolds, theater goers are treated to some of the most brilliant, suspenseful sequences in modern theater

The production at Albany Civic Theater is directed by Jennifer Van Iderstyne who joins us now along with Kevin MacNamara who plays Jack Manningham in Angle Street and John Sutton who plays Inspector Rough.

  James Conrad from The Golden Notebook in Woodstock, NY joins us with this week's Book Picks.

List:
The Last Love Song: A Biography of Joan Didion by Tracy Daugherty
Eileen by Otessa Moshfegh
Purgatory & Paradise: Sassy 70s Suburbia and the City by Meryl Meisler (event on Saturday Sept 4 at the Center for Photography at Woodstock)
The Road Not Taken: Finding America in the Poem Everyone Loves and Almost Everyone Gets Wrong by David Orr
A Celebration of the Seasons: Good Night Songs by Margaret Wise Brown
Auggie and Me: Three Wonder Stories by R. J. Palacio
How to Stay Alive in the Woods by Bradford Angier
Nagasaki: Life After Nuclear War by Susan Southward
Radioactive: Marie and Pierre Curie by Lauren Redniss
The Mindfulness Coloring Book: Anti-Stress Art Therapy for Busy People by Emma Farrarons

8/25/15 Panel

Aug 25, 2015

     The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  Linda Fairstein was chief of the Sex Crimes Unit of the district attorney’s office in Manhattan for more than two decades and is America’s foremost legal expert on sexual assault and domestic violence. Her Alexandra Cooper novels are international bestsellers and have been translated into more than a dozen languages.

After publishing sixteen novels, Fairstein can still keep her legion of fans on the edge of their seats, offering rollercoaster plot twists and simmering emotional foreplay between her two main characters, NYPD Detective Mike Chapman and District Attorney Alexandra “Coop” Cooper.

She forwards the story in her new novel, Devil’s Bridge.

Pages