The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, listener call-ins, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you have any questions or you'd like to be on the show, email us at roundtable@wamc.org

"Book Picks" lists are here.

  Two iconic American artists, Andy Warhol and Winslow Homer, are featured in major exhibitions at The Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, NY this summer.

The Late Drawings of Andy Warhol: 1973-1987 features 50 drawings, some of which are on view to the public for the very first time. This exhibition has been organized by The Andy Warhol Museum, one of the four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh.

Homer’s America: Selections from the Permanent Collection presents approximately two dozen works, including engravings, etchings and paintings that chronicle American life.

Both exhibits opened on June 21 and will be on view into September. Our friend Erin Coe is the Director of The Hyde and she joins us now.

  Income inequality has become a theme of the early 2016 campaign.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Paul Tonko tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that the middle and working classes are being left behind.

Marisa Scheinfeld

  Photographer Marisa Scheinfeld grew up in New York’s Catskills region, not far from its legendary resorts of the Borscht Belt, a name derived from the area’s popularity with Jews from the New York region who for years were not welcome at many other vacation spots.

For much of the 20th century the Borscht Belt was a thriving vacation destination, home to hundreds of hotels and motels, from famed high-end resorts such as Grossinger’s and the Concord to modest bungalow colonies. In its heyday, the area was known especially for its nightlife, with top comedians and other performers appearing regularly there.

By the time Scheinfeld was growing up there in the 1980s and ‘90s, however, economic and other factors had sent the region into rapid decline, leading many of the hotels and clubs to close. For the past five years, Scheinfeld has documented that decline through a series of evocative, sometimes ghostly large-scale images of dozens of empty hotels.

An exhibit of that work, Echoes from the Borscht Belt: Contemporary Photographs by Marisa Scheinfeld, is at the Yiddish Book Center’s Brechner Gallery.

  We learned this morning that one of our first Book Picks independent booksellers and friend, Scott Meyer of Merritt Books, passed away after a long fight with cancer. Before we share this week's Book Picks - we remember Scott and send his family and friends our condolences.

 This week's Book Picks come from Connie Brooks of Battenkill Books in Cambridge, NY.

List:
The Hand that Feeds You by A. J. Rich
Bell Weather by Dennis Mahoney
The Little Paris Bookshop by Nina George
The Oregon Trail: A New American Journey by Rinker Buck
Independence Lost: Lives on the Edge of the American Revolution by Kathleen DuVal
Escape from Mr. Lemoncello's Library by Chris Grabenstein
Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson
The Maine Coon's Haiku: And Other Poems for Cat Lovers by Michael Rosen and illustrated by Lee Anthony White

7/21/15 Panel

Jul 21, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  The Sendak Fellowship is a residency program that supports artists who tell stories with illustration. The Fellowship offers a four-week summer retreat for several artists to live and work at Scotch Hill Farm in Cambridge, New York.

The goal of the Sendak Fellowship, in Maurice’s words, was for the Fellows to “create work that is not vapid, stupid, or sexy, but original. Work that excites and incites. Illustration is like dance; it should move like—and to—music.” The Sendak Fellowship was inaugurated in 2010.

  Everyone is a suspect in the Capital Rep production of Murder For Two, a musical murder mystery with a twist: one actor investigates the crime, the other plays all of the suspects and they both play the piano.

The show is a blend of classic musical comedy and madcap mystery. The New York Times calls it “Ingenious! A snazzy doubt act,” while Entertainment Weekly describes it as “A charmingly frenetic all-stops out musical comedy.”

We welcome two actors from the production: Kyle Branzel and Ian Lowe.

  In the end, disgruntled Democrats couldn’t stop fast-track authority.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont representative Peter Welch tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock why many in his party opposed the move.

  People have been getting naked in public for reasons other than sex for centuries. But as novelist and narrative journalist Mark Haskell Smith shows in Naked at Lunch, being a nudist is more complicated than simply dropping trou. “Nonsexual social nudism,” as it’s called, rose to prominence in the late nineteenth century.

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