The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, listener call-ins, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you have any questions or you'd like to be on the show, email us at

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

9/23/15 Panel

Sep 23, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Unlike many of his peers in the arts, actor Wendell Pierce was never afraid of leaving his native New Orleans for a shot at the big leagues. Trained at Juilliard, Pierce went on to star on Broadway and on the screen, best known for roles in Selma, Treme and as homicide detective Bunk Moreland on The Wire, which Pierce calls the role of a lifetime.

  William Finnegan is an author and staff writer with the New Yorker best known for covering conflicts in Somalia, Sudan and Mexico, and gritty corners of America and South Africa. War and peace, life and death, policy failures and injustice. He has covered it all.

So, it makes perfect sense that his new memoir is about surfing. His new book – already a bestseller - is Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life. Finnegan says surfing only looks like a sport and to initiates, it is something else entirely: a beautiful addiction, a demanding course of study, a morally dangerous pastime, a way of life.

Finnegan is the author of several books: Cold New World, A Complicated War, and Crossing the Line. He has twice been a National Magazine Award finalist and has won numerous journalism awards. He is a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1987.

 Many Hudson Valley residents are worried about contracting Lyme disease.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that vigilance is a must. 

  Joe Albany was a critically acclaimed but little known jazz pianist - one of the few white musicians to play bebop with Charlie Parker. His story is told in the film, Low Down - based on a memoir by Amy-Jo Albany, his daughter.

The film tells the story of a man torn between his musical ambition, his devotion to his teenage daughter, and his suffocating heroin addiction.

On Monday, September 28th at 7pm Amherst Cinema will present a screening of the film as part of their Jazz a la Mode film series.

  Today's Book Picks come from Matt Tannenbaum from The Bookstore in Lenox, MA.

Fast Shuffle: A Novel by David Black
A Manual for Cleaning Women: Selected Stories by Lucia Berlin
Pedigree by Patrick Modiano
So You Don't Get Lost in the Neighborhood by Patrick Modiano
Confessions of an Imaginary Friend by Michelle Cuevas

9/22/15 Panel

Sep 22, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  From his childhood in factories and fishing boats to his earth shattering sailing adventure as an adult Jack London found himself face to face with the poor and the oppressed where ever he went and he recounted their stories in Gritty Detail. 

Certainly if you ask people about Jack London we tend to remember him as the author of the adventure stories White Fang and The Call of the Wild, but in her new biography Cecilia Tichi contends that Jack London was as much of a public intellectual as he was a writer. He was no apolitical adventurer but a reporter who through fiction and non fiction made no attempt to hide the horrors that he witness. The book is Jack London: A Writer's Fight for a Better America.