The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, listener call-ins, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Bill Cosby, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you have any questions or you'd like to be on the show, email us at roundtable@wamc.org

"Book Picks" lists are here.

    

  New York Times–bestselling writer C. J. Box returns to his Joe Picket series with Endangered, a thrilling new novel, featuring the Wyoming game warden.

Joe Pickett had good reason to dislike Dallas Cates, even if he was a rodeo champion, and now he has even more—Joe’s eighteen-year-old ward, April, has run off with him. And then comes even worse news: The body of a girl has been found in a ditch along the highway—alive, but just barely, the victim of blunt force trauma. It is April, and the doctors aren’t sure if she’ll recover. Cates denies having anything to do with it—says she ran away from him, too—and there’s evidence that points to another man. But Joe knows in his gut who’s responsible.

    

  This week's Book Picks come from Connie Brooks of Battenkill Books in Cambridge, NY.

List:
A God in Ruins by Kate Atkinson
Inside the O’Briens by Lisa Genova
The Light of the World: A Memoir by Elizabeth Alexander
The Wright Brothers by David McCullough
Reagan: A Life by H. W. Brands
The Antarctic Book of Cooking and Cleaning: A Polar Journey by Wendy Trusler and Carol Levine
Mosquitoland by David Arnold
Welcome to the Neighborwood by Shawn Sheehy

5/12/15 Panel

May 12, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao, and Associate Editor of the Time Union, Mike Spain.

Scheduled topics include Tom Brady four game suspension, Skelos out, White House anger over Seymour Hersh’s Bin Laden story, Arctic drilling, Picasso painting sells for $179 million.

 

   Waking Up to the Dark: Ancient Wisdom For a Sleepless Age by Clark Strand is a book for those of us who awaken in the night and don’t know why we can’t get back to sleep, and a book for those of us who have grown uncomfortable in real darkness—which we so rarely experience these days, since our first impulse is always to turn on the light.

In the tradition of Thomas Merton’s spiritual classic The Seven Storey Mountain or Thomas Moore’s Care of the Soul, Waking Up to the Dark is a resonant and personal project and a modern gospel that is an investigation of the relationship between darkness and the soul.

  From drone warfare in the Middle East to digital spying by the National Security Agency, the U.S. government has harnessed the power of cutting-edge technology to awesome effect. But what happens when ordinary people have the same tools at their fingertips? Advances in cybertechnology, biotechnology, and robotics mean that more people than ever before have access to potentially dangerous technologies—from drones to computer networks and biological agents—which could be used to attack states and private citizens alike.

In The Future of Violence, law and security experts Benjamin Wittes and Gabriella Blum detail the myriad possibilities, challenges, and enormous risks present in the modern world, and argue that if our national governments can no longer adequately protect us from harm, they will lose their legitimacy. We welcome Gabriella Blum to The Roundtable.

U.S. Senate

  After the earthquake, many New Yorkers were frantically checking on relatives in Nepal.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Senator Chuck Schumer tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that Nepalese Americans need a helping hand. 

  On May 6, 2013, Amanda Berry made world-wide headlines when she kicked and clawed her way out of a Cleveland home and called 911, saying: “Help me, I’m Amanda Berry. . . I’ve been kidnapped, and I’ve been missing for ten years. And I’m here. I’m free now.” So began one of the most remarkable criminal stories of recent times. With an offer of a ride, Ariel Castro, a local school bus driver with a history of domestic violence, separately lured Berry, Gina DeJesus, and Michelle Knight to his run-down West Cleveland house, where he kept them locked and chained in the basement.

In the decade that followed, the three were repeatedly raped, psychologically abused, threatened with death, and often fed one meal a day.

In the new book: Hope: A Memoir of Survival in Cleveland by Amanda Berry and Gina DeJesus, Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post reporters Mary Jordan and Kevin Sullivan interweave the events within Castro’s house with original reporting on efforts to find the missing girls.

  For over 50 years, Ralph Nader has brought to public attention--and fought on our behalf against--the reckless influence of corporations on government. Political parties have a nasty habit of slipping issues off the table. Ralph Nader has strategies for putting them back on that he'll share with attendees of the "Getting It Done: How to Restore and Repair Our Wounded Democracy" conference at The Rowe Center in Rowe, MA 5/15-5/17.

Nader's new book is Return to Sender: Unanswered Letters to the President, 2001-2015. In letters addressed to Presidents George Bush and Barack Obama, Ralph Nader provides incisive critiques of more than a decade of American policy decision and indecision.

5/11/15 Panel

May 11, 2015

    

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Political Consultant Libby Post and SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Scheduled topics include President Obama and trade agreement; King Salman of Saudi Arabia won't attend meetings at Camp David; President Obama intends to renew a nuclear cooperation agreement with China; Mississippi Police Officers killed; Indian Point transformer explosion; Dean Skelos faces growing opposition.

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