The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9:00am

WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, listener call-ins, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Bill Cosby, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you have any questions or you'd like to be on the show, email us at roundtable@wamc.org

"Book Picks" lists are here.

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The Roundtable
12:00 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Roundtable Music 1/9

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Thu January 9, 2014

"Rethinking the 1950s: How Anticommunism and the Cold War Made America Liberal"

   Historians generally portray the 1950s as a conservative era when anticommunism and the Cold War subverted domestic reform, crushed political dissent, and ended liberal dreams of social democracy. These years, historians tell us, represented a turn to the right, a negation of New Deal liberalism, an end to reform.

Jennifer Delton argues that, far from subverting the New Deal state, anticommunism and the Cold War enabled, fulfilled, and even surpassed the New Deal's reform agenda. Anticommunism solidified liberal political power and the Cold War justified liberal goals such as jobs creation, corporate regulation, economic redevelopment, and civil rights.

In her book, Rethinking the 1950s: How Anticommunism and the Cold War Made America Liberal, Skidmore College History Professor Jennifer Delton shows how despite President Eisenhower's professed conservatism, he maintained the highest tax rates in U.S. history, expanded New Deal programs, and supported major civil rights reforms.

Arts & Culture
11:12 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Albany Symphony Orchestra's January 11th And 12th Concerts

  It is a big weekend for the Albany Symphony Orchestra. One of the greatest pianists alive today, André Watts, takes the stage on January 11th and it will be Symphony Sunday featuring Beethoven on the 12th - both concerts taking place at the Palace Theatre in Albany.

Maestro David Alan Miller joins us to tell us more.

Congressional Corner
10:50 am
Thu January 9, 2014

Congressional Corner With Chris Gibson

  2014 begins with a rare budget agreement in Washington, but the next election cycle is already here.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Representative Chris Gibson — a Republican from the 19th district — tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that his bipartisanship should be a benefit.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Thu January 9, 2014

"Cutting Along The Color Line" By Quincy T. Mills

   Today, black-owned barbershops play a central role in African American public life. The intimacy of commercial grooming encourages both confidentiality and camaraderie, which make the barber shop an important gathering place for African American men to talk freely.

But for many years preceding and even after the Civil War, black barbers endured a measure of social stigma for perpetuating inequality: though the profession offered economic mobility to black entrepreneurs, black barbers were obliged by custom to serve an exclusively white clientele.

In his book, Cutting Along the Color Line, Vassar History Professor Quincy Mills chronicles the cultural history of black barber shops as businesses and civic institutions.

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The Roundtable
9:00 am
Thu January 9, 2014

1/9/14 Panel

    

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, newsman Ray Graf and Daily Freeman Publisher Emeritus, Ira Fusfeld.

Topics include:
Christie Bridge Controversy
State of the State - NY
Gates on Biden
Baseball Hall of Fame
Zero Tolerance in Schools

The Roundtable
12:00 pm
Wed January 8, 2014

Roundtable Music 1/8

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Wed January 8, 2014

"The Girls of Atomic City" By Denise Kiernan

    The Girls of Atomic City rescues a remarkable, forgotten chapter of American history from obscurity. Denise Kiernan captures the spirit of the times through these women: their pluck, their desire to contribute, and their enduring courage.

At the height of World War II, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was home to 75,000 residents, consuming more electricity than New York City. But to most of the world, the town did not exist. Thousands of civilians--many of them young women from small towns across the South--were recruited to this secret city, enticed by solid wages and the promise of war-ending work. Kept very much in the dark, few would ever guess the true nature of the tasks they performed each day in the hulking factories in the middle of the Appalachian Mountains. That is, until the end of the war--when Oak Ridge's secret was revealed.

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The Roundtable
11:12 am
Wed January 8, 2014

"Jacob's Oath" By Martin Fletcher

Martin Fletcher has been called the gold standard of TV war correspondents and is rapidly building a new reputation as an author. He has won almost every award in television journalism, including 5 Emmys.

His latest novel is Jacob's Oath. As World War II comes to a close, Europe’s roads are clogged with 20 million exhausted refugees walking home. Among them are Jacob and Sarah, lonely holocaust survivors who meet in Huddle berg. Jacob is consumed with hatred and cannot rest until he kills his brother’s murderer, a concentration camp guard.

He must now choose between revenge and love, and avenging the past and building a new future. 

Congressional Corner
10:50 am
Wed January 8, 2014

Congressional Corner With Tim Vercellotti

    Casino gambling appears on the horizon for Springfield, Massachusetts.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti, director of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science, tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that voters in Springfield have welcomed MGM to the city.

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