The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, listener call-ins, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you have any questions or you'd like to be on the show, email us at roundtable@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

  In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney discusses prison reform with WAMC’s Alan Chartock. 

Muppeteers and Big Bird
http://www.iambigbird.com/

  The Northampton Arts Council presents a special screening of I Am Big Bird: The Caroll Spinney Story on Friday February 12th at the Academy of Music Theatre in Northampton.

The film will be followed by a Q&A session at which Mr. Spinney, his wife Debra and a very special guest will be discussing their journey and answering questions.

The documentary chronicles the life of Caroll Spinney, the man who has been Sesame Street's Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch since 1969. For over 4 decades, Caroll's characters have been cherished by generations of children. At 81 years old, the tenacious and enthusiastic performer has no intention of slowing down.

Caroll Spinney joins us this morning.

2/8/16 Panel

Feb 8, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

    The Breakfast Club defined an entire generation of pop culture and included such talent as Molly Ringwald “the princess,” Anthony Michael Hall “the brain,” Emilio Estevez “the jock,” Judd Nelson “the criminal,” and Ally Sheedy “the basket-case.”

It is likely the late John Hughes most-loved film and it's receiving a cinema re-release from Fathom Events tomorrow night and next Tuesday, March 31st. To commemorate the anniversary, we spoke with Kirk Honeycutt about his book, John Hughes: A Life in Film.  

Honeycutt is the former chief film critic for The Hollywood Reporter for many years and subsequent to that, senior film reporter for that publication. Honeycutt is a member of the prestigious Los Angeles Film Critics Association, and is the creator of Honeycutt's Hollywood, a popular film review website.

  Molly Ringwald’s Twitter Bio line reads: actress, writer, singer, mother, your former teen-age crush. Indeed, I will admit, I had a crush on Molly Ringwald in the mid 1980’s when she starred in the John Hughes classic films Pretty in Pink, Sixteen Candles and The Breakfast Club. We were both teenagers then. In fact, we are the same age. Yes, she knows her fan base.

A lot of that fan base will, no doubt, be getting together this Saturday night at Proctors Theatre in Schenectady for the event: Molly Ringwald Revisits the Club - The 30th Anniversary Screening of The Breakfast Club. She will be part of an on-stage discussion and Q&A following the movie.

The Breakfast Club is known as the “quintessential 1980s film” and is considered one of the best films of the decade. The film was ranked #1 on Entertainment Weekly’s list of the 50 Best High School Movies. Molly Ringwald was ranked #1 on VH-1’s 100 Greatest Teen Stars. And to prove my job doesn’t get much cooler than this: we welcome Molly Ringwald to The RT this morning.

    

  Stokely Carmichael, the charismatic and controversial black activist, stepped onto the pages of history when he called for “Black Power” during a speech one Mississippi night in 1966.

A firebrand who straddled both the American civil rights and Black Power movements, Carmichael would stand for the rest of his life at the center of the storm he had unleashed that night.

In Stokely, preeminent civil rights scholar Peniel E. Joseph presents a groundbreaking biography of Carmichael, using his life as a prism through which to view the transformative African American freedom struggles of the twentieth century.

  In 2006, Tavis Smiley teamed up with other leaders in the Black community to create a national plan of action to address the ten most crucial issues facing African Americans. 

The Covenant with Black America, which became a #1 New York Times bestseller, ran the gamut from health care to criminal justice, affordable housing to education, voting rights to racial divides. But a decade later, Black men still fall to police bullets and brutality, Black women still die from preventable diseases, Black children still struggle to get a high quality education, the digital divide and environmental inequality still persist, and American cities from Ferguson to Baltimore burn with frustration. In short, the last decade has seen the evaporation of Black wealth, with Black fellow citizens having lost ground in nearly every leading economic category.

2/5/16 Panel

Feb 5, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

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