The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

 WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9 a.m. to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge, Lin-Manuel Miranda and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org

Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

Dawn Upshaw
Brooke Irish

There will be a Centennial Tribute to Ella Fitzgerald on Sunday night at 8PM at Tanglewood’s Seiji Ozawa Hall. The Tanglewood Music Center Vocal Concert will feature mezzo-soprano Stephanie Blythe, Pianist Lee Musiker, musicians of the Boston Pops, TMC Vocal Fellows and our next guest - Dawn Upshaw.

Dawn Upshaw is the Artistic Director of Bard College’s Conservatory of Music as well as the Charles Franklin Kellogg and Grace Ramsey Kellogg Professor of the Arts and Humanities.

She has been at Bard since 2004. The winner of three Grammy Awards; she is featured on more than 50 recordings. She is also the first singer to be named a “Perspectives” Artist by Carnegie Hall. 

Seiji Ozawa Hall at Tanglewood
Sarah LaDuke

As you walk along Tanglewood’s meandering paths, it’s easy to miss a series of small wooden shacks nestled amongst the pine trees -- until you hear the sweet music emanating from within. It’s here that the Tanglewood Music Center Fellows hone their craft and learn from the masters.

For decades, talented young musicians from around the country and around the globe have been coming to the Berkshires to study with some of the best musicians in the world.  Today we’re joined by Ellen Highstein – the Director of the Tanglewood Music Center.

Andris Nelsons
Marco Borggreve

Andris Nelsons is Music Director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and is the designated Gewandhauskapellmeister of the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig. He made his Boston Symphony debut in March 2011, leading Mahler’s Symphony no. 9 at Carnegie Hall.

In summer 2012, Nelsons made his debut in Tanglewood, and in 2013 at Boston Symphony Hall. And began his tenure as Music Director of the BSO in the 2014/15 season and after one year his contract was extended through the 2021/22 season.

In summer 2015 and spring 2016, the BSO and Nelsons embarked on their first European tours, receiving widespread critical acclaim. It’s Summer 2017 now and Nelsons is back at Tanglewood with The BSO.

As the season begins at Tanglewood, we speak to a man who not only is keeping the plates spinning here, he also has an eye on Boston and is even working on programming for future years here at Tanglewood.

Tony Fogg has been Artistic Administrator of the Boston Symphony Orchestra since 1994 and assists the Music Director in the planning and selection of all BSO concerts and repertoire.

A pianist by training, he is one of our favorites to chat with and it is a great pleasure to welcome Tony back to our Tanglewood Roundtable.

The Tanglewood Music Center Orchestra kicks off its 2017 season under the direction of Andris Nelsons this coming Monday - July 10th. The performance features Swedish trumpeter Håkan Hardenberger, one of Mr. Nelsons' closest artistic collaborators, and Thom Rolfs, BSO principal trumpet and a former TMC Fellow.

Highlighting the program are two concertos written for Hardenberger by acclaimed English composer Mark-Anthony Turnage. Hardenberger is soloist in the 2004 concerto From the Wreckage, an emotional journey transporting listeners from a spiky introduction to the calm plateau of its final resolution.

Hardenberger is joined by Thom Rolfs for Turnage's 1995 double trumpet concerto Dispelling the Fears. Mark-Anthony Turnage's music has been performed frequently at Tanglewood since he was a TMC Fellow in 1983.

We begin our remote broadcast from Tanglewood with an abbreviated RT Panel and welcome our man from The Berkshire Eagle, Kevin Moran and Managing Director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Mark Volpe.

In 1917, New York State was one of the first to grant women the right to vote. With the support of a grant from the New York State Council on the Arts, Hudson River Bank and Trust Foundation, and private donations, Shaker Museum | Mount Lebanon is celebrating that important anniversary with its newest exhibition, Break Every Yoke: Shakers, gender equality, and women’s suffrage. The exhibition is on view in the historic 1829 Brethren’s Workshop via guided tour through October 9.

The exhibition draws on more than 75 artifacts from Shaker Museum | Mount Lebanon’s collections and we went there recently to discuss the exhibition with Shaker Museum Executive Director Lacy Schutz.

In The Revolution of Robert Kennedy, journalist John R. Bohrer focuses in intimate and revealing detail on Bobby Kennedy's life during the three years following JFK's assassination. Torn between mourning the past and plotting his future, Bobby was placed in a sudden competition with his political enemy, Lyndon Johnson, for control of the Democratic Party.

No longer the president's closest advisor, Bobby struggled to find his place within the Johnson administration, eventually deciding to leave his Cabinet post to run for the U.S. Senate, and establish an independent identity. Those overlooked years of change, from hardline Attorney General to champion of the common man, helped him develop the themes of his eventual presidential campaign.

Voice Theatre is a professional company based at the historic landmark Byrdcliffe Theater in Woodstock, NY. They create new productions and explore relevant dimensions of classic works.

Their production of Thornton Wilder’s The Skin Of Our Teeth opens tonight. In it - the prehistoric world meets Suburbia. The Antrobus family – George and Maggie, their children, Gladys and Henry, and Sabina, a maid who is also George’s mistress – survive the Election, Climate Change and the End of the World. Combining tragedy with comedy, wit, intelligence and imagination the play is one of the defining moments in American Theater.

To tell us more – we welcome actors: Christa Trinler playing Sabina and Phil Mansfield who is playing George Antrobud along with Shauna Kanter - director and artistic Director of Voice Theatre. 

John Faso
John Faso

Halfway through 2017, 2018 is looming large.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Republican John Faso of the 19th district speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: The Beguiled

Upcoming:

Cold War Classics: Rocky IV, Red Dawn - Madison Theater, Albany, Thursday 7/6 through Sunday 7/9, various times

Mamma Mia! - Capital Repertory Theatre, Albany, opens Friday 7/7, 8 PM (thru 8/13)

Jonathan Edwards - Caffe Lena, Saratoga Springs, Friday 7/7, 8 PM

Michael Winslow - Funny Bone, Crossgates Mall, Guilderland, Friday 7/7 through Sunday 7/9, various times

Opera Saratoga: The Cradle Will Rock - Spa Little Theater, Saratoga Springs, Sunday 7/9, 7:30 PM; Tuesday 7/11, 2 PM

Samantha Farrell - The Clark, Williamstown, Tuesday 7/11, 6:30 PM

Free Film Series: Kung Fu Panda - Palace Theatre, Albany, Tuesday 7/11, 1 PM

Pink Martini - Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Tuesday 7/11, 8 PM

Knights of the Sales Office - Adirondack Theatre Festival, Chas. R. Wood Theater, Glens Falls, opens Tuesday 7/11, 7:30 PM (thru 7/20)

Sam Roberts Band, Rechorduroys - Empire State Plaza, Albany, Wednesday 7/12, 5 PM
 

New Movies: Paris Can Wait, Spider-Man: Homecoming, The Big Sick

7/6/17 Panel

Jul 6, 2017

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois and College of St. Rose Department of Communications Chair, Cailin Brown.

Kathleen Tagg and David Krakauer
Jill Steinberg / krakauertaggduo.com

The Cooperstown Summer Music Festival is now in its 19th season. On July 9th Grammy nominated clarinetist David Krakauer and acclaimed South African pianist Kathleen Tagg perform their collaborative project called "Breath and Hammer: Clarinet, Piano and Beyond."

Enhanced by an immersive video feed, the performance features Krakauer and Tagg’s arrangements of works by composers as diverse as New York-based visionary John Zorn and Cuban percussionist Roberto Rodriguez, as well as original compositions by Krakauer and Tagg, with influences ranging from interlocking African drumming patterns to romantic symphonic music to minimalism to Klezmer. 

David Krakauer, Kathleen Tagg and Festival Artistic Director Linda Chesis join us.

http://empac.rpi.edu

EMPAC’s Spatial Audio Summer Workshop is a first-of-its-kind international gathering of composers and programmers focused on 3D immersive audio technologies such as Wave Field Synthesis (WFS) and High-Order Ambisonics. The sonic equivalent of 3D cinema, these new systems allow the composer to place and move virtual sounds through and around the physical listening space.

In 2016, EMPAC built one of the world’s most extensive and precise Wave Field systems, consisting of over 500 tiny speakers.

While many electronic musicians are currently interested in the promise of this new technology, some speculate that these systems could become prevalent in theaters, cinemas, home entertainment systems, and with virtual reality platforms. The public is invited to attend performances using these systems on July 10 and 13. 

To tell us more - Todd Vos is EMPAC’s lead audio engineer and spearheaded the construction of EMPAC’s new Wave Field Synthesis array. Argeo Ascani is EMPAC’s curator of music and has begun working with an international roster of composers to begin developing new content for the WFS system. 

Seventy-year-old "Chick" Chicarella has one prized possession, a 1967 Jaguar that is in desperate need of repair. When his son, "Bone", suggests that they finish the car and sell it off, old family wounds and failures rise to the surface.

That's the story behind The Jag by Gino DiIorio, now playing at Shadowland Stages in Ellenville, NY through July 16th. The Jag stars Dan Grimaldi - best known for his roles as twins Philly and Patsy Parisi  on HBO’s The Sopranos.

  Nineteenth-century New York City was one of the most magnificent cities in the world, but also one of the most deadly. Without any real law enforcement for almost 200 years, the city was a lawless place where the crime rate was triple what it is today and the murder rate was five or six times as high. The staggering amount of crime threatened to topple a city that was experiencing meteoric growth and striving to become one of the most spectacular in America.

In Law & Disorder: The Chaotic Birth of the NYPD, award-winning historian Bruce Chadwick examines how rampant violence led to the founding of the first professional police force in New York City. 

Joe Cocker: Mad Dog With Soul movie poster
Joe Cocker: Mad Dog With Soul

The life and legacy of one of music’s peerless voices will be discussed this Saturday at Upstate Films Woodstock, which will screen the new documentary Joe Cocker: Mad Dog With Soul at Upstate Films Woodstock. The 9 p.m. showing will be followed by a conversation with director John Edginton, who has produced and directed several other documentaries, as well as Woodstock co-creator Michael Lang, who managed Cocker for many years. The film is a warts-and-all look at a soulful singer from Sheffield, a showbiz survivor who battled alcoholism for most of his adult life.

7/5/17 Panel

Jul 5, 2017

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of The Times Union Mike Spain, and Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois.

Lauren Yee
laurenyee.com

  New York Stage and Film and Vassar College’s Powerhouse Theatre presents an Inside Look Workshop of Lauren Yee’s new play, The Great Leap July 7-9.

The play is set in San Francisco in the Spring of 1989.  Manford Lum, locally renowned on the sidewalk basketball courts of Chinatown, talks his way onto a college team, just before they travel to Beijing for a "friendship" game.  His background is a mystery, but he can sink 100 free throws in a row, so who cares?  When they arrive, China is in the throes of the post-Cultural Revolution era, and Manford must juggle international politics and his own personal history.

Pokey LaFarge
Nate Burrell

Not too many musicians can claim a sound all their own, but in the past decade or so Pokey LaFarge seems to have accomplished just that over hundreds of tour dates and the eight studio albums he has released. The latest album is Manic Revelations, which came out in May. LaFarge and his band will be in our region for several dates this summer.

With Republicans in control of Washington, Democrats are apprehensive about the future of Social Security and Medicare.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Connecticut Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty, a Democrat from the fifth district, wraps up her conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Rick Wartzman is director of the KH Moon Center for a Functioning Society at the Drucker Institute, a part of Claremont Graduate University. He also writes about the world of work for Fortune magazine online. Before joining the Drucker Institute in 2007 as its founding executive director, Rick worked for two decades as a reporter, editor and columnist at The Wall Street Journal and Los Angeles Times.

In his new book, The End of Loyalty: The Rise and Fall of Good Jobs in America, Wartzman chronicles the erosion of the relationship between American companies and their workers. Through the stories of four major employers--General Motors, General Electric, Kodak, and Coca-Cola--he shows how big businesses once took responsibility for providing their workers and retirees with an array of social benefits.

7/3/17 Panel

Jul 3, 2017

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, political consultant and lobbyist, Libby Post, and Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois. 

The Charlemont Forum in Charlemont Massachusetts is an ongoing lecture series that explores the causes of and possible solutions for one aspect of the current divisions in American political culture. 

On Wednesday, July 5th at 7 p.m., The Charlemont Forum is hosting a community reading of Frederick Douglass' famous speech, "What to the Slave is the 4th of July."

The co-artistic directors of the Double Edge Theater of Ashfield, are partnering with the Charlemont Forum to choreograph an engaging event. Actors from the Double Edge Theater together with approximately nine other readers who have volunteered from the hill towns, will give a dramatic reading of this stirring speech, which dates back to 5 July, 1852. 

We are joined now by Bruce Lessels - a Charlemont Forum Board member and a Board member for the Double Edge Theater Company in Ashfield, Massachusetts.

PennDesign Pavillion at Manitoga
Sarah LaDuke

Designer Russel Wright’s home, studio, and woodland garden - collectively called Manitoga - are located in Garrison, NY and will have a Member's Summer Celebration on Saturday, July 8.

Manitoga’s Artist Residency program was initiated in 2014 to foster creative responses to Manitoga that invoke Russel Wright's legacy of creative experimentation and celebration of place. For this year’s Residency, Master of Architecture Students at the University of Pennsylvania School of Design have designed, built and installed a full-scale, site-specific pavilion which will be on view through November 13.

Last year's residency artist, Peter Bynum, also has work on display in the home. (An interview with him can be found here

Executive Director Allison Cross joins us to talk about this season’s plans.

It’s hard to overstate the hours most people around my age spent with R.L. Stine’s books growing up. The author of several series including Goosebumps and Fear Street, Stine has sold more than 300 million copies. Goosebumps is now marking its 25th anniversary. It’s also become a feature film starring Jack Black, with a sequel on the way, a TV series, and led to spinoff book series, including the new SlappyWorld story arc.

Each July and August the Williams College Museum of Art (WCMA) produces Summer School, a series of public programs that teases out new ways of thinking about learning, art, community, and museums. This summer, the series offers a playful taste of college culture taking inspiration from unconventional archives and the quirkiest kinds of libraries. It’s a weekly mashup of mini courses, extracurriculars on WCMA’s patio, a lending library, and pop-up programming in the museum’s Reading Room. 

Each week, Williams faculty and local experts lead hour-long mini courses in the galleries. These talks explore the museum’s collection, exhibitions, and spaces through the lens of libraries and archives.

To tell us more – we welcome Nina Pelaez - Assistant Curator of Public Programs at Williams College Museum of Art. 

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