The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

  WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you have any questions or you'd like to be on the show, email us at roundtable@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to discuss augmented and virtual reality. What are they and what is the difference? We will get into that in just a moment.

Jesse Feiler helps people and organizations get to know and use new technologies. Projects have included building the page caching module for the Prodigy Web Browser for Mac in the very early days of the Web, location-based apps for iPhone and iOS, as well as books and classes on new technologies. Forthcoming books include “iPad For Seniors for Dummies" (9th edition) and “Learn Apple HomeKit on the Mac and iOS.”

Current projects involve using apps and FileMaker databases for identifying and managing risk in nonprofit organizations as well as helping small communities build location-based apps to promote tourism, downtown economic development, and the wise use of natural resources.

Margaux Bergen began writing her new book when her daughter Charlotte turned nine and she gave it to her right after graduation from high school, when she was setting off for her first day of college.

In Navigating Life: Things I Wish My Mother Had Told Me, Bergen shares her own lessons learned in hopes that her trials and errors might benefit her daughter as she set off for college and prepares to navigate life for the first time on her own.

Margaux Bergen has spent the last twenty years raising three children and working all over the world at large and small institutions focused on international development and women’s leadership.

  Former two-term Hudson Valley Congressman John Hall has been out of office since losing the 2010 election, but he’s stayed busy.

Today, Hall speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock in their first Congressional Corner segment in six years.

This is a segment from an hour-long interview about Hall’s new memoir (Still The One: A Rock'n'Roll Journey to Congress and Back) which airs Thursday 8/18 at 1 p.m.

Mark Ouillette from The Book Loft in Great Barrington, MA joins us with this week's Book Picks list.

List:
Mr. Eternity by Aaron Thier
Pond by Claire-Louise Bennett
Ninety-Nine Stories of God by Joy Williams
Surrender, New York by Caleb Carr
Patient H.M.: A Story of Memory, Madness, and Family Secrets by Luke Dittrick

8/16/16 Panel

Aug 16, 2016

 

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Paper By Mark Kurlansky

Aug 15, 2016

  Paper is one of the simplest and most essential pieces of human technology. For the past two millennia, the ability to produce it in ever more efficient ways has supported the proliferation of literacy, media, religion, education, commerce, and art; it has formed the foundation of civilizations, promoting revolutions and restoring stability.

Now, amid discussion of “going paperless”―and as speculation about the effects of a digitally dependent society grows rampant― we’ve come to a world-historic juncture. By tracing paper’s evolution from antiquity to the present, with an emphasis on the contributions made in Asia and the Middle East, Mark Kurlansky challenges common assumptions about technology’s influence, affirming that paper is here to stay.

  He was a 19-year-old sailor ashore in Japan. She was a 31-year-old Japanese woman. This is the beginning to the memoir, Please Enjoy Your Happiness - the story of Paul Brinkley-Rogers, former sailor and Pulitzer-winning journalist.

The author talks of 1959 and the lingering impact of the woman he left behind a lifetime ago.

For many years Paul Brinkley-Rogers worked in Asia as a staff member of Newsweek, covering the wars in Vietnam and Cambodia, the death of Chairman Mao, and Japan's economic miracle. He also reported from Latin America for The Miami Herald, sharing the Pulitzer Prize with a reporting team in 2001 for coverage of the Elian Gonzalez custody battle.

  The Philadelphia Orchestra's Music Director Yannick Nézet-Séguin, Musical America’s 2016 Artist of the Year and newly appointed Music Director of The Metropolitan Opera, returns to SPAC for the final week of the orchestra's summer residency. 

He joins us to talk about this week's concerts in Saratoga.

**Correction - in the audio introduction of this interview it is said that Andre Watts will perform - sadly he has had to cancel. The opening concert will feature Czech pianist Lukas Vondracek.

  Retiring Utica-area Congressman Richard Hanna was the first House Republican to announce he is voting for Hillary Clinton. He’s also said he won’t endorse the Republican running to replace him in Congress.

In today’s Congressional Corner, WAMC’s Alan Chartock speaks with that Republican —state Assemblywoman Claudia Tenney.

  You can discover how the lives of humans, red knots, and horseshoe crabs are intertwined when Deborah Cramer - environmental writer and visiting scholar at MIT - will discuss her new book The Narrow Edge: A Tiny Bird, an Ancient Crab, and an Epic Journey at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook on Friday night at 7 p.m.

In the book, and in her presentation, Cramer depicts an inspiring portrait of loss and resilience, the tenacity of birds, and the courage of the many people who keep red knots flying.

  Legendary singer-songwriter and two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Famer, inducted as a member of both the iconic folk-rock band The Byrds — with whom he first rose to stardom — and the iconic Woodstock era-defining group Crosby, Stills & Nash.

At The Bardavon on August 20th, Crosby will play songs from throughout his storied career, and will be joined by his son James Raymond on piano.

8/15/16 Panel

Aug 15, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  In 2000, while moving his household from Vermont to North Carolina, David Payne watched from his rearview mirror as his younger brother, George A., driving behind him in a two-man convoy of rental trucks, lost control of his vehicle, fishtailed, flipped over in the road, and died instantly.

Soon thereafter, David’s life hit a downward spiral. His career came to a standstill, his marriage disintegrated, and his drinking went from a cocktail-hour indulgence to a full-blown addiction. He found himself haunted not only by George A.’s death, but also by his brother’s manic depression, a hereditary illness that overlaid a dark family history whose roots now gripped David.

Barefoot to Avalon is Payne’s earnest and unflinching account of George A. and their boyhood footrace that lasted long into their adulthood, defining their relationship and their lives.


  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yeuda Hanani continue their conversation about female composers focusing on Hildegard von Bingen and sharing her "O viridissima virga" performed by the women’s section of Voices of Ascension.

  The Philadelphia Orchestra will present Sophisticated Ladies on Saturday, August 13th at SPAC. The concert is a celebration of the groundbreaking icons of American popular song, from Ella Fitzgerald to Sarah Vaughan to Dinah Washington and of course, Billie Holiday. Montego Glover, Capathia Jenkins, and N'Kenge will join the orchestra to sing songs like "Strike Up the Band," "Stormy Weather," "Love is Here to Stay," and "Come Rain or Come Shine."<p>

Steven Reineke will conduct and he joins us to talk about the concert.

  Many Muslims have settled in Utica.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Republican New York state Assemblywoman Claudia Tenney, a candidate for the 22nd House district seat, tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that she doesn’t appreciate Donald Trump’s recent comments even though she supports him.

  Nearly seventy-five years ago, Donald Triplett of Forest, Mississippi, became the first child diagnosed with autism. Beginning with his family’s odyssey, In a Different Key tells the extraordinary story of this often misunderstood condition, and of the civil rights battles waged by the families of those who have it. Unfolding over decades, it is a beautifully rendered history of ordinary people determined to secure a place in the world for those with autism—by liberating children from dank institutions, campaigning for their right to go to school, challenging expert opinion on what it means to have autism, and persuading society to accept those who are different.  

We speak with John Donvan and Caren Zucker.

8/12/16 Panel

Aug 12, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  Pauli Murray has been called one of the most important figures in 20th century African American civil rights history. This remarkable woman was the granddaughter of a mulatto slave who among other achievements was a founding member of CORE, graduated at the top of her class at Howard University School of Law, was named Madame Moiselle Magazine women of the year in 1947, wrote states laws on race and color which Thurgood Marshall called "the bible of civil rights lawyers," was appointed to JFK’s commission on the status of women and co-founded national organization for women in 1966. Murray is now the subject of Patricia Bell-Scott’s biography The Firebrand and First Lady: Portrait of a Friendship: Pauli Murray, Eleanor Roosevelt and the Struggle for Social Justice. Patricia Bell-Scott is professor emerita of women studies in human development and family science at the University of Georgia. 

  In The Violet Hour, Katie Roiphe takes an unexpected and liberating approach to the most unavoidable of subjects. 

She investigates the last days of six great thinkers, writers, and artists as they come to terms with the reality of approaching death, or what T. S. Eliot called “the evening hour that strives Homeward, and brings the sailor home from sea.”

Katie Roiphe will be in conversation with Kate Bolick as part of The Mount's Touchstones series on 8/18.

  Upstate New York’s 22nd House district is getting a new representative.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Republican New York state Assemblywoman Claudia Tenney tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock why she’s running.


  Drama League and Drama Desk Award nominee Julia Coffey has joined the company of The Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival to take over the roles of Rosalind in As You Like It, and Mariana and Mistress Overdone in Measure for Measure.

Staged in the tent at Boscobel House and Gardens in Garrison, NY and framed by stunning Hudson Valley views, As You Like It runs in rep through August 27th, and the final performance of Measure for Measure’s will be on August 28th.

The Hike
Penguin

In his second novel, Drew Magary shares some characteristics with the protagonist — they’re both Marylanders by way of Minnesota with a wife and three kids. But in this modern, fantasy take on the Odyssey, none of the rules of our dimension apply. What The Hike shares with his first novel, The Postmortal, is a keen eye for action and a deep understanding of human needs, fears and longing. Magary, a correspondent for GQ and a columnist for Deadspin, has written three other books, but is maybe most proud to be a Chopped champion.

8/11/16 Panel

Aug 11, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Gregory Crewdson

  Gregory Crewdson will discuss the making of his most recent body of work in a conversation with acclaimed author Rick Moody at The Mahaiwe on Monday, August 15th at 7pm.

The evening will include the first ever projected slideshow presentation of Cathedral of the Pines in its entirety, set to Yo La Tengo's "Night Falls on Hoboken," remixed specially for this event by Grammy-winning producer/engineer Drew Brown.

Cathedral of the Pines (2013–14) was made during three productions in and around the rural town of Becket, Massachusetts. The work premiered at Gagosian Gallery in New York earlier this year, and will be seen for the first time in Europe, concurrently in Brussels and Paris in September.

Rick Moody is the author of six novels, three collections of stories, a memoir, and a collection of essays on music. His most recent publication is Hotels of North America, a novel. He writes regularly about music at The Rumpus, and writes the column "Rick Moody, Life Coach," for LitHub.

  The puppeteers that brought the world the unforgettable Broadway Musical War Horse will once again amaze audiences as they bring to life the timeless Russian fairytale ballet "The Firebird."

SPAC, along with the Mann Center for the Performing Arts, Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts, Ravinia Festival, Sun Valley Summer Symphony, and Hollywood Bowl — has commissioned the South Africa-based puppet company Janni Younge Productions to create a live puppet performance set to Igor Stravinsky’s 1910 masterpiece.

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