The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

  WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org

Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

1/27/17 Panel

Jan 27, 2017

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, Author and Activist Barbara Smith.

In September 1998, Claudia Rowe was a young reporter working as a stringer for the New York Times in Poughkeepsie, New York when local police, confounded by two years of missing-women reports, discovered eight decayed bodies stashed in the home where Kendall Francois lived with his mother, father and teenage sister.

The corpses were found only after Kendall, a polite twenty-seven-year-old, confessed while being booked for something far more routine. He fit few traditional descriptions of a serial murderer, and many in Poughkeepsie struggled to comprehend how this “gentle giant” could be responsible for such brutality.

Reaching out after Kendall’s arrest, Rowe began an intense four-year conversation with the killer through letters, phone calls and face-to-face meetings. Rowe writes about this in her new book, The Spider And The Fly: A Reporter, A Serial Killer, And The Meaning Of Murder.

Claudia Rowe is a staff writer at The Seattle Times and has twice been nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. 

Best-selling author Ayelet Waldman’s new book, A Really Good Day: How Microdosing Made a Mega Difference in My Mood, My Marriage, and My Life is her firsthand experience taking microdoses of LSD, the effect it had on her, and the ethical problems it presented.  To be clear: Ayelet did not drop a tab of acid; rather, she took a “microdose” (ten milligrams under her tongue) a few times each week for one month. 

What drove her to using LSD? It was perimenopause (and years of accompanying treatments with psychiatrists and psychologists, meditation, to little or no avail). When her mood storms became intolerable, she did what many of us do: she fell down an internet rabbit hole, eventually receiving a vial in her mailbox. Within a month, Ayelet joined the ranks of scientists and civilians successfully using LSD in therapeutic microdoses. 

As has been the case for almost a decade, health care is the top issue for many in Washington.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Republican John Faso tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock what he’d like to see happen to Obamacare.

Shawn Stone, Digital Editor of The Alt joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: John Cleese at Proctors, Elle, Patriots Day

Upcoming:

  • Radical Kingdoms opening reception - Mandeville Gallery, Union College, Schenectady, Thursday, 1/26, 5-6:30 PM
  • Now Ensemble + San Fermin - Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Thursday, 1/26, 7:30 PM
  • Ellen Sinopoli Dance Company - Massry Center for the Arts, Albany, Friday, 1/27, 7:30 PM
  • Assisted Loving - Capital Repertory Theatre, Albany, previews open Friday, 1/27, 8 PM (through 2/19)
  • Gilbert Gottfried - The Comedy Works, Saratoga Springs. Friday, 1/27, 7:30 and 9:30 PM
  • Charles Atlas’ Tesseract - EMPAC Theater, RPI, Troy, Friday-Saturday, 1/27-28, 8 PM
  • Rock and Roll High School - Madison Theater, Albany, Friday-Sunday, 1/27-29, various times
  • Captured Moments: 170 Years of Photography from the Albany Institute - Albany Institute of History & Art, Albany, opens Saturday, 1/28 (through 5/21)
  • Los Lobos - The Egg, Albany, Sunday, 1/29, 7:30 PM
  • Why Be Good? - Proctors, Schenectady, Monday 1/30, 3, 5 and 7 PM

New movies: Paterson, Resident Evil: The Final Chapter, Sleepless, A Dog’s Purpose

1/26/17 Panel

Jan 26, 2017

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, WAMC's Ray Graf, and Communications Specialist Theresa Bourgeois.

  Despite the outpouring of books, movies, museums, memorials, and courses devoted to the Holocaust, a coherent explanation of why such ghastly carnage erupted from the heart of civilized Europe in the twentieth century still seems elusive even seventy years later. 

Peter Hayes' Why? dispels many misconceptions and answers some of the most basic, yet vexing, questions that remain: why the Jews and not another ethnic group? Why the Germans? Why such a swift and sweeping extermination? Why didn’t more Jews fight back more often? Why didn’t they receive more help?

Peter Hayes is professor of history and German and Theodore Zev Weiss Holocaust Educational Foundation Professor of Holocaust Studies Emeritus at Northwestern University and chair of the Academic Committee of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Jon Else joins us this morning to tell us tell the inside story of Henry Hampton’s 1987 landmark multipart television series Eyes on the Prize, one of the most important and influential TV shows in history.

His new book is True South: Henry Hampton and Eyes on the Prize, the Landmark Television Series That Reframed the Civil Rights Movement. Jon Else was Hampton’s series producer and cinematographer for Eyes on the Prize.

The book focuses on the tumultuous 18 months in 1985 and 1986 when Eyes was created. True South is being published on the 30th anniversary of Eyes’ initial broadcast on PBS, which reached 100 million viewers. 

Upstate New York’s 19th House district has a new Congressman.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Republican John Faso tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that he’s getting used to life in Washington.

The life story of Coretta Scott King—wife of Martin Luther King Jr., founder of the Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change (The King Center), and singular twentieth-century American civil and human rights activist—as told fully for the first time, toward the end of her life, to Rev. Dr. Barbara Reynolds.

Dr. Barbara Reynolds is an ordained minister, a columnist, and the author of several books, including Out of Hell & Living Well: Healing from the Inside Out. She was a longtime editorial board member of USA Today, won an SCLC Drum Major for Justice Award in 1987, and was inducted into the Board of Preachers at the 29th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. International College of Ministers and Laity at Morehouse College in 2014.

1/25/17 Panel

Jan 25, 2017

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and corporate attorney Rich Honen.

Lisa Wade is an associate professor of sociology at Occidental College. Her newest book, American Hookup is about the emergence and character of the culture of sex that dominates college campuses today.

American Hookup situates hookup culture within the history of sexuality, the evolution of higher education, and the unfinished feminist revolution. With new research, Wade maps out a punishing emotional landscape marked by unequal pleasures, competition for status, and sexual violence. She discovers that privileged students tend to enjoy it the most, and considers its effects on racial and sexual minorities, students who “opt out,” and those who participate ambivalently.

  This week's Book Picks  come from Kira Wizner of Merritt Bookstore.

List:
How to Talk so Little Kids Will Listen by Joanna Faber and Julie King
Anton and Cecil: Cats Aloft by Lisa Martin and Valerie Martin
Mary Reilly by Valerie Martin
The Butcher’s Hook by Janet Ellis
Difficult Women by Roxane Gay
Homesick for Another World by Ottessa Moshfegh
Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden
Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk by Kathleen Rooney

The Democratic Party is spending at least the next two years on the sidelines in Washington.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney, a Democrat from the 18th district, concludes his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Charles Ross with a lightsaber
Charles Ross

The Star Wars universe has been expanding rapidly in recent years, from 2015’s The Force Awakens, which continued the original series through Episode VII, to 2016’s Rogue One, a standalone prequel. But most fans of the series reserve their fondest memories for the original trilogy — and our guest is still fighting the Battle of Endor. Charlie Ross brings his One Man Star Wars Trilogy back to Proctors in Schenectady on Saturday. It’s a tour-de-Force, so to speak, in a black box setting, with Ross performing everything from Chewbacca to John Williams’ score.

1/24/17 Panel

Jan 24, 2017

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of the Times Union Mike Spain, and Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao.

Coy Bowles is the guitarist of the Grammy Award–winning Zac Brown Band. He is also a children's book author and his latest is When You're Feeling Sick - a book full of encouraging (and super-silly) rhyming advice on how to face sick days with courage and a positive attitude.

Composers Mark Dancigers and Ellis Ludwig-Leone are collaborating on an evening of music performed by their respective groups NOW Ensemble and members of San Fermin that will bring them to Troy Savings Bank Music Hall in Troy, NY this Thursday at 7:30pm.

San Fermin has received critical praise from the likes of NPR, The New York Times, Pitchfork, Rolling Stone, The Guardian, Le Monde, Washington Post, CBC and more. The band’s self-titled premier album was released in 2013, the follow-up, Jackrabbit, came out in 2015. Their third album, Belong, will be released in April.

NOW Ensemble has brought some of the most exciting composers of their generation to national and international recognition.

This special collaboration between NOW Ensemble and San Fermin will be performed in New York City, Boston, and Troy.

Encore: Proctors At 90

Jan 23, 2017

When Proctors opened its doors in Schenectady, N.Y., in December 1926, it was the jewel in a chain of 50 vaudeville houses spanning the East Coast from Delaware to Maine; the greatest of gilded movie palaces in a bustling, industrial city packed with nearly two-dozen theatres. Within a half-century, it was the last hall standing, nearly derelict, presiding over a deserted downtown, another symbol of American blight.

The new book Encore: Proctors at 90 presents photographs and essays to construct a narrative of renewal and rebirth, a tale of a city and a theatre taking turns saving each other. Rescued by a hardy group of citizens, and nurtured by smart leaders, Proctors began its true resurrection at the turn of this century to become much more than a playhouse.

The commerative book Encore: Proctors at 90 is now out and we welcome the authors Michael Eck and Richard Louvrich to The Roundtable.

There has been major environmental news in the Hudson Valley of late.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney, a Democrat from the 18th district, continues his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Malissa Pilette-McClenon - Director of Development and Marketing - YWCA of the Greater Capital Region to discuss the Jamison-Rounds Ready for Work Program – designed to help underprivileged women find and keep employment and/or pursue education. 

1/23/17 Panel

Jan 23, 2017

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and political consultant and lobbyist, Libby Post.

1/20/17 Panel

Jan 20, 2017

 The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, WAMC's Ray Graf, and Communications Specialist Theresa Bourgeois.  

As part of a team of journalists from Newsday, Michael D'Antonio won the Pulitzer Prize for his reporting before going on to write many acclaimed books, including The Truth About Trump. He has also written for EsquireThe New York Times Magazine, and Sports Illustrated.

In A Consequential President, Michael D'Antonio tallies President Obama’s long record of achievement, recalling both his major successes and less-noticed ones that nevertheless contribute to his legacy. The record includes Obama's role as a inspirational leader who was required to navigate race relations as the first black president and had to function in an atmosphere that included both racial acrimony from his critics and unfair expectations among supporters. In light of these conditions, Obama's greatest achievement came as he restored dignity and ethics to the office of the president, and serve as proof that he has delivered the hope and the change he promised eight years before.

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