The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

 WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9 a.m. to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge, Lin-Manuel Miranda and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org

The Roundtable is also available as a podcast.  Subscribe today!

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Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

11/2/17 Panel

Nov 2, 2017

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are: WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Professor of Political Science at Siena College Vera Eccarius-Kelly, Daily Freeman Publisher Emeritus Ira Fusfeld and Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois. 

Ron Chernow is the prizewinning author and the recipient of the 2015 National Humanities Medal. His first book, The House of Morgan, won the National Book Award, Washington: A Life won the Pulitzer Prize for Biography, and Alexander Hamilton (the inspiration for the Broadway musical) won the American History Book Prize.

His new book, Grant, provides a complete understanding of Ulysses S. Grant -- the general and president whose fortunes rose and fell with dizzying speed and frequency.

Kate Shindle in Fun Home
Joan Marcus

The musical Fun Home has been called “groundbreaking,” “exquisite” and “unforgettable” - winning five 2015 Tony Awards including Best Musical and making history along the way. 

Based on Alison Bechdel’s best-selling graphic memoir, Fun Home introduces us to Alison at three different ages as she explores and unravels the many mysteries of her childhood.

Kate Shindle is a former Miss America, the current President of Actor’s Equity and is now starring as Alison Bechdel in the touring production of Fun Home - now playing at Proctors through November 5th.

The first charges to come out of the Mueller investigation have begun a new era in Washington.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

The current exhibition at The Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, NY is entitled A Shared Legacy: Folk Art in America. It opened to the public Sunday, October 8, and runs through Sunday, December 31.

It features works of art from the respected collection of Barbara Gordon, one of the country’s prominent collectors of folk art. A Shared Legacy celebrates folk art traditions in rural areas of New England, the South, and the Midwest between 1800 and 1925. The exhibition is on a national tour that included stops at the American Folk Art Museum, Westmoreland Museum of American Art, Denver Art Museum, and Cincinnati Art Museum.

It includes more than sixty works, including paintings (still life, portrait, and landscape), sculpture, furniture, and decorative art. Much of the art was created by self-taught artists and artists, or those who had minimal formal training. 

The Hyde Collection’s Interim Director Anne Saile and head of Museum Education Jenny Hutchinson join us. 

11/1/17 Panel

Nov 1, 2017

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are: WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Community Engagement editor and Staff Reporter at the Berkshire Eagle Jenn Smith, Communications Consultants Theresa Bourgeois and Albany County District Attorney David Soares.

The Chocolate Lab

Oct 31, 2017

Take one family's chocolate shop, add a dash of competition with the fancy new store on the block, stir in a candy-crazy Labrador named Cocoa...and you've got a recipe for disaster! If Mason and Hannah can win first prize at the annual Chocolate Expo, they may be able to save their parents' shop. But Cocoa can't control himself in the kitchen. And one more mess means they'll have to say goodbye to their pup for good!

Eric Luper is an author for young readers. In addition to two series with Scholastic Books called Key Hunters and The Chocolate Lab, Eric writes for Cartoon Network for shows including The Amazing World of Gumball, The Regular Show, and Teen Titans Go! He also has written titles for Scooby-Doo, Star Trek, and Star Wars: The Force Awakens. 

The first Empire State Youth Orchestra concert of the season on November 4 will make music history as the Youth Orchestra teams up with pianist Jeffrey Biegel at Troy Savings Bank Music Hall to perform the New York State Premiere of a recent composition from legendary musical satirist P.D.Q. Bach. The evening will also include Bach's Toccata and Fugue in D Minor and Prokovfiev's Symphony No. 5. 

Helen Cha-Pyo is the Conductor and Music Director of the Empire State Youth Orchestra joined us on the program. 

Listener Essay - Music At Last

Oct 31, 2017

Stephen Gerard Dietemann makes his living as an architect and musician in the Berkshires and beyond. He can be reached at sgddesign@gmail.com.

Music At Last

I can’t remember exactly how it started, but one day I knew I had to learn to play the bass guitar.  Perhaps it was a thought, long suppressed, that if there were reincarnation, I wanted to come back as a musician.  I had spent most of my life in creative fields – architecture is my day job, and the visual arts my avocation since adolescence – but something was still missing. At 55 the illusion of youth that time was unlimited was long gone and the sense that it’s now or never created an urgency previously unexperienced. 

Today's Book Picks list comes from Laura Knapp of The Northshire Bookstore.

List:
From Here to Eternity: Traveling the World to Find the Good Death by Caitlin Doughty

You Don't Have to Say You Love Me by Sherman Alexie

The ACB with Honora Lee by Kate De Goldi

Still Stuck by Shinsuke Yoshitake

The Unlikely Story of a Pig in the City by Jodi Kendall

Turtles All the Way Down by John Green

Role Models by John Waters

Pug & Pig Trick-or-Treat by Sue Lowell Gallion

Three of the last six governors of Massachusetts have run for president. What’s next for Charlie Baker?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science, concludes his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

By 2025, Americans will likely be donating over half a trillion dollars annually to nonprofit organizations. Those philanthropic gifts will transform significant parts of America's civic sector landscape.

Philanthropy is entering an era of unprecedented growth and innovation. Established foundations such as Ford and Rockefeller are doubling down on programs tackling long-simmering problems, including global inequality, less-than-stellar education, and uneven access to health care. Many foundations are engaging in advocacy on controversial issues, exploring venture philanthropy solutions, and experimenting with impact investing. And philanthropists such as Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, New York's high-profile financiers, and Silicon Valley's billionaires are planning to put their wealth to work as never before: Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan recently pledged to donate 99 percent of their Facebook shares during their lifetimes, and nearly 150 others have signed the Giving Pledge to increase dramatically their "giving while living."

In Putting Wealth to Work, Joel L. Fleishman provides expert analysis of contemporary philanthropy, offering invaluable insight for those engaging with and affected by charitable foundations. This is the fascinating and definitive account of philanthropy today, and an indispensable guide to understanding its inner workings, impact, and expansive potential.

10/31/17 Panel

Oct 31, 2017

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are: WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Times Union Associate Editor Mike Spain, and political consultant and lobbyist, Libby Post.

CiderDays is an annual community celebration of all things apple in beautiful Franklin County, Massachusetts. 2017 marks their 23rd year with tours, cidermaking and tastings, workshops and much more in orchards and venues county-wide from Ashfield, Deerfield, Turners Falls, Charlemont and Colrain to New Salem and the towns in between.

Whether you are a cider aficianado (hard or sweet), make your own cider, are an orchardist, like hanging out in bucolic orchards, or just enjoy soaking up all the goodness of autumn in New England, CiderDays is a pretty cool event. To find out more – we welcome Al Sax from the CiderDays committee and home hard cider maker, April Woodard.

Breaking the Code, a play by Hugh Whitemore tells the story of computer genius Alan Turing. The play is being staged by Performing Arts of Woodstock for a three-week run beginning November 3rd.

It is only a slight exaggeration to say that the British mathematician Alan Turing saved the Allies from the Nazis and invented the computer and artificial intelligence - all before his suicide at age forty-one.  Breaking The Code tells how Turing's revolutionary ideas laid the foundation for the modern computer, and how he took a leading role in breaking the German Enigma ciphers during WW II, a scientific triumph that was critical to Allied victory.  

This is also the tragic account of a man who, despite his wartime service, was arrested and forced to undergo cruel and humiliating chemical castration -- all for trying to live honestly in a society that defined homosexuality as a criminal office -- gross indecency.

The play is directed by Bette Siler and Wallace Norman and they join us.

What’s in the tax overhaul?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science, continues his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial FoundationProviding a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This morning we focus on the Albany Damien Center which is opening their new 26,000 square foot building at 728 Madison Ave, Albany. They will also have a fundraiser on November 4: Norman Rea Presents A Phoenix Rising A Capital Celebration of the new Damien Center. Perry Junjulas is the Executive Director of The Albany Damien Center.

10/30/17 Panel

Oct 30, 2017

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are: WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois, and Counter-terrorism experct Malcolm Nance.

In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their series of conversations about quoting, sampling, borrowing in music - sharing Offenbach's Can-Can and Saint-Saëns' Le Carnaval des Animaux - Tortues. 

Close Encounters with Music’s next presentation, "The Politics of Opera" with Author and Scholar Mitchell Cohen will take place on Nov 12. 

God Needed A Puppy

Oct 27, 2017

News10 Anchorman, John Gray, is an Emmy Award winning journalist and writer. When John’s puppy Samuel died unexpectedly at just six months old it brought a profound sadness to their home and a sense that this was just not fair. For the first time John understood how a child must feel when they lose a pet of any age, asking themselves, “Why?”

Hoping to turn his pain into something positive, John put pen to paper and wrote a story to help any child who has lost a pet.

His new book, God Needed a Puppy guides children through the grieving process by using friendly animals from the forest to explain the reasons why a beloved pet sometimes has to leave us.

John will be talking about and signing the new book on Saturday, November 18 at Barnes & Noble in Colonie Center in Colonie at 4PM. He will be at Battenkill Books in Cambridge, NY on December 2.

Like countless other kids, Phil Gaimon grew up dreaming of being a professional athlete. But unlike countless other kids, he actually pulled it off. After years of amateur races, hard training, living out of a suitcase, and never taking “no” for an answer, he finally achieved his goal and signed a contract to race professionally on one of the best teams in the world.

Now, Gaimon pulls back the curtain on the WorldTour, cycling’s highest level. He takes readers along for his seasons in Europe, covering everything from rabid, water-bottle-stealing Belgian fans, to contract renewals, to riding in poisonous smog, to making friends in a sport plagued by doping. Draft Animals reveals a story as much about bike racing as it is about the never-ending ladder of achieving goals, failure, and finding happiness if you land somewhere in-between.

The president’s poll numbers are low, but his base seems unshakable.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science, speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

On October 28th and 30th, Pakistan’s Sachal Ensemble will come to Proctors and the Saratoga Performing Arts Center as part of their first United States tour.

The Sachal Jazz Ensemble was created by Izzat Majeed, a Pakistani investor and hedge fund manager turned philanthropist and music producer. Majeed had been deeply influenced by American Jazz. The Sachal Ensemble, based in the city of Lahore, caught a break when a video of them performing a version of Brubeck’s ‘Take Five’ went viral and caught the attention of trumpeter and composer Wynton Marsalis. This resulted in a collaboration with Marsalis at Lincoln Center.

Their journey from Lahore to Lincoln Center was documented in the film Song of Lahore, which was created by Academy Award® winning director Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy & Andy Schocken. It shows traditional musicians trying to survive under the oppression and brutality of modern day Pakistan.

The film Song of Lahore will be screened at Proctors on Tuesday, October 24 and Bow Tie Criterion Cinemas in Saratoga Springs on Sunday, October 29.

Joining us today is Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy and the President and CEO of Saratoga Performing Arts Center Elizabeth Sobol.

10/27/17 Panel

Oct 27, 2017

 

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are: WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Former EPA Regional Administrator Judith Enck, Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois, Siena College Economics Professor Aaron Pacitti and author Joe Bruchac.


  Bill Yosses was the White House Pastry Chef from 2007-2014, hired by First Lady Laura Bush and baking under The Obamas -- working with First Lady Michelle Obama on her Let’s Move! Campaign - specifically by increasing the use of fresh, natural ingredients and decreasing the portion size and amount of refined sugar.

 

Since leaving Washington DC, Yosses has operated The Perfect Pie in New York City and since February he’s provided the pre-show pies for the Off-Broadway production of Sweeney-Todd: The Demon Barber Of Fleet Street in New York City.

 

The Sweet Spot: Dialing Back Sugar and Amping Up Flavor is a new cookbook, co-written by Yosses and Peter Kaminsky and featuring wonderful photographs by Evan Sung.

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