The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

  WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org

Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Congressman Jim McGovern, a Democrat from the second district, concludes his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

In the spring of 1942, the United States rounded up 120,000 residents of Japanese ancestry living along the West Coast and sent them to interment camps for the duration of World War II. Many abandoned their land. Many gave up their personal property. Each one of them lost a part of their lives.

Amazingly, the government hired famed photographers Dorothea Lange, Ansel Adams, and others to document the expulsion--from assembling Japanese Americans at racetracks to confining them in ten camps spread across the country. Their photographs, exactly seventy-five years after the evacuation began, give an emotional, unflinching portrait of a nation concerned more about security than human rights. These photographs are more important than ever.

12/21/16 Panel

Dec 21, 2016

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, corporate attorney Rich Honen and his daughter, a student at Ithaca College, Emily Honen.

A Life In Ornaments

Dec 20, 2016
Elf Christmas ornament
Bob Eisenhardt

First highlighted in the New York Times, Bonnie Mackay’s annual Christmas tree showcases a lifetime collecting almost 3,000 ornaments. 

Now, through beautiful photography and illuminating vignettes, Tree of Treasures shares the heartfelt stories behind a hundred of those cherished possessions, whether it’s the story of a family member, like Mackay’s grandfather, a well-known vaudeville performer; long-held relationships with friends and colleagues in the international community of Christmas crafts makers; a memory of a beloved pet; and much more. 

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to discuss the ins and outs of writing code. Is it as difficult as it sounds?

Jesse Feiler helps people and organizations get to know and use new technologies. His most recent books are “Learn Apple HomeKit on iOS” and “iPad for Seniors for Dummies.”

Current projects include Utility Smart to manage use of utility resources (with Curt Gervich at SUNY Plattsburgh Risk Management for Nonprofits).

Visit the Congressional App Challenge website.

Fidel is gone and the future of Cuba is an open question.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Congressman Jim McGovern, a Democrat from the second district, continues his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

  This week's Book Picks from Amy Lane at The Open Door Bookstore and Gift Gallery in Schenectady, NY.

List:
Atlas Obscura by Joshua Foer
A History of Sports in 100 Objects by Cait Murphy
Best American Infographics 2016 by Gareth Cook
Jerusalem by Alan Moore
The Noblest Roman by Jerry Kelly & Misha Beletsky
Hattie's Restaurant Cookbook by Jasper Alexander
Encore: Proctors at 90 by Michael Eck and Richard Lovrich
The Wish Tree words by Kyo Maclear, Pictures by Chris Turnham

12/20/16 Panel

Dec 20, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of the Times Union Mike Spain, and Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao.

In Strangers in Their Own Land, sociologist Arlie Hochschild embarks on a thought-provoking journey from her liberal hometown of Berkeley, California, deep into Louisiana bayou country—a stronghold of the conservative right. As she gets to know people who strongly oppose many of the ideas she famously champions, Hochschild nevertheless finds common ground and quickly warms to the people she meets people whose concerns are actually ones that all Americans share: the desire for community, the embrace of family, and hopes for their children.

Strangers in Their Own Land goes beyond the commonplace liberal idea that these are people who have been duped into voting against their own interests. Instead, Hochschild finds lives ripped apart by stagnant wages, a loss of home, an elusive American dream—and political choices and views that make sense in the context of their lives. Hochschild draws on her expert knowledge of the sociology of emotion to help us understand what it feels like to live in “red” America.

The popular vote and the Electoral College do not align in 2016.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Congressman Jim McGovern, a Democrat from the second district, speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

  On sabbatical from teaching literature to undergraduates, and wanting to educate a different kind of student, Mikita Brottman starts a book club with a group of convicts from the Jessup Correctional Institution in Maryland.

She assigns them ten dark, challenging classics—including Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, Shakespeare’s Macbeth, Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Poe’s story “The Black Cat,” and Nabokov’s Lolita—books that don’t flinch from evoking the isolation of the human struggle, the pain of conflict, and the cost of transgression. Although Brottman is already familiar with these works, the convicts open them up in completely new ways. Their discussions may “only” be about literature, but for the prisoners, everything is at stake.

Gradually, the inmates open up about their lives and families, their disastrous choices, their guilt and loss. Brottman's book is The Maximum Security Book Club: Reading Literature in a Men's Prison.

12/19/16 Panel

Dec 19, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and political consultant and lobbyist, Libby Post.


  Cirque du Soleil's Paramour combines -- for the first time - Cirque’s signature spectacle with Broadway's story-telling and song in a production currently running at The Lyric Theatre in New York City. Set in the world of Golden Age Hollywood, the show spins the tale of a beautiful young actress named Indigo who is forced to choose between success and true love.

Ruby Lewis made her Broadway debut in Paramour when it opened in May.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, we continue to learn about the music of Thea Musgrave.

"A Christmas Carol" at BTG - 2016
Emma Kate Rothenberg-Ware

It is an absolute Christmas Classic. And at the Colonial Theatre in Pittsfield – it is tradition.

It is the timeless holiday tradition of A Christmas Carol with the whole family, and revel in the joy and redemptive power of Christmas as told in the tale of Ebenezer Scrooge, the infamous miser who is shown the error of his ways and reformed by four spirits.

We are able to journey back to Victorian England and experience the classic story filled with holiday carols and the wonderment of the season.

Joining us – like ghosts in the night – Berkshire Theatre Group Artistic Director and CEO Kate Maguire, Travis Daly – director of the show and Scrooge himself – Eric Hill. 

The fight against opioid addiction continues.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont Representative Peter Welch concludes his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Liberals worldwide invoke Scandinavia as a promised land of equality, while most conservatives fear it as a hotbed of liberty-threatening socialism. But the left and right can usually agree on one thing: that the Nordic system is impossible to replicate elsewhere.  
 
In Viking Economics, George Lakey dispels these myths. He explores the inner-workings of the Nordic economies that boast the world’s happiest, most productive workers, and explains how, if we can enact some of the changes the Scandinavians fought for surprisingly recently, we, too, can embrace equality in our economic policy.

12/16/16 Panel

Dec 16, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Communications Specialist Theresa Bourgeois, and author and activist, Barbara Smith.

The Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, MA is a nonprofit organization working to tell the whole Jewish story by rescuing, translating, and disseminating Yiddish books and presenting innovative educational programs that broaden understanding of modern Jewish identity.

Lisa Newman, Director of Communications at the Yiddish Book Center joins us this morning for a great selection of Hanukkah books.

List:

Modern Jewish Cooking: Recipes and Customs for Today's Kitchen by Leah Koenig 

Stars in The Ring: Jewish Champions in the Golden Age of Boxing by Mike Silver 

The Parakeet Named Dreidel by Isaac Bashevis Singer

The Latke Who Couldn't Stop Screaming: A Christmas Story by Lemony Snicket

Ben Shahn's New Deal Murals: Jewish Identity in the American Scene by Diana L. Linden

The Abandoned Book and Other Yiddish Stories: An Anthology of Pakn Treger Translations edited by Eitan Kensky

Have I Got A Story For You: More Than a Century of Fiction from the Forward edited by Ezra Glinter

Zahav: A World of Israeli Cooking by Michael Solomonov

In Those Nightmarish Days: The Ghetto Reportage of Peretz Opoczynski and Josef Zelkowicz edited by Samuel D. Kassow and translated by David Suchoff

Molly on the Range: Recipes and Stories from An Unlikely Life on a Farm by Molly Yeh

Nobel Peace Prize Laureates His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu have survived more than fifty years of exile and the soul-crushing violence of oppression. Despite their hardships—or, as they would say, because of them—they are two of the most joyful people on the planet.

In The Book of Joy, they look back on their long lives to answer a single burning question: How do we find joy in the fact of life’s inevitable suffering?

The Book of Joy is featured on Oprah’s Favorite Things list for 2016 and is an instant New York Times bestseller. Doug Abrams is the co-writer of The Book of Joy and he joins us. 

Is the Affordable Care Act on life support?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont Representative Peter Welch continues his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Shawn Stone, Digital Editor of The Alt joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: Office Christmas Party 

Upcoming:

  • Cherish the Ladies - Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy, Thu 12/15, 7:30 PM
  • Gremlins - Madison Theatre, Albany, Thu-Sun 12/15-18, various times
  • Found Footage Festival - It Came From Schenectady, Proctors, Fri 12/16, 7:30 PM
  • The Figgs Christmas Show - The Low Beat, Albany, Fri 12/16, 8 PM
  • Lapalux - EMPAC Studio 1, Troy, Fri 12/16, 8 PM
  • truTV Impractical Jokers - The Tenderloins - Palace Theatre, Albany, Fri 12/16, 6:30 and 9:30 PM
  • It’s a Wonderful Life - Capitol Theatre, Rome, Fri 12/16, 7 PM; Sat 12/17, 2:30 and 7 PM
  • Albany Berkshire Ballet’s The Nutcracker - The Egg, Albany, Sat 12/17, 1:30 and 5:30 PM
  • Christmas, Sinatra Style with the Joey Thomas Big Band - Proctors, Schenectady, Sat 12/17, 7:30 PM
  • Boston Camerata - Union College Memorial Chapel, Schenectady, Sun 12/18, 3 PM
  • Miracle On 34th Street - Cohoes Music Hall, Cohoes, Tue 12/20, 7 PM

New Movies: Rogue One, Collateral Beauty, and Jackie (opens Tuesday 12/20)

12/15/16 Panel

Dec 15, 2016

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois and Daily Gazette Editor Judy Patrick and, for a portion of the program, Times Union Editor, Rex Smith.  

Julia Turshen is a writer and recipe-developer. She has coauthored such cookbooks as Spain...A Culinary Road Trip with Mario BataliIt's All Good with Gwyneth PaltrowMastering My Mistakes in the Kitchen with Dana Cowin, as well as The Kimchi ChroniclesHot Bread KitchenThe Fat Radish Kitchen Diaries, and Buvette. She hosted the first two seasons of Radio Cherry Bombe and has written for VogueBon AppétitFood & WineSaveur, and The Wall Street Journal

In The Wars of the Roosevelts: The Ruthless Rise of America's Greatest Political Family, William J. Mann presents a modern revisionist biographical history of one of America’s greatest and most influential families—the Roosevelts—exposing heretofore unknown family secrets and detailing complex family rivalries with his signature cinematic flair.

Bellevue Hospital, on New York City's East Side, occupies a colorful and horrifying place in the public imagination: a den of mangled crime victims, vicious psychopaths, assorted derelicts, lunatics, and exotic-disease sufferers. In its two and a half centuries of service, there was hardly an epidemic or social catastrophe—or groundbreaking scientific advance—that did not touch Bellevue.

In Bellevue: Three Centuries of Medicine and Mayhem at America's Most Storied Hospital, David Oshinsky chronicles the history of America's oldest hospital and in so doing also charts the rise of New York to the nation's preeminent city, the path of American medicine from butchery and quackery to a professional and scientific endeavor, and the growth of a civic institution. From its origins in 1738 as an almshouse and pesthouse, Bellevue today is a revered public hospital bringing first-class care to anyone in need.

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