The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

  WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you have any questions or you'd like to be on the show, email us at roundtable@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

8/3/16 Panel

Aug 3, 2016

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  The Seagle Music Colony in Schroon Lake is presenting the world premiere production of a new opera by composer Evan Mack and librettist Joshua McGuire based on the novel Roscoe by Pulitzer Prize winning author William Kennedy.

With music that draws from many popular 20th-century styles, the story follows the character Roscoe Conway, a king-pin in the mid 1940’s Albany political machine, as he navigates his way through a multitude of political and personal challenges, both past and present.

Performances take place from August 3rd through the 6th. To tell us more we welcome composer Evan Mack, librettist Joshua McGuire, Seagle Music Colony Artistic Director Darren Woods and Pulitzer Prize winning author William Kennedy. 

 

The Arkell Museum at Canajoharie, NY is presenting the exhibition Circus Circus through October 16th featuring paintings of the American circus by artists from the 1920s and 1930s alongside circus-themed marketing materials used by the Beech-Nut Packaging Company in the 1930s.

 

The circus coming to town was a highly anticipated event in small towns across America, and many artists in the twenties and thirties painted the spectacle of the parade as the circus arrived, and the excitement under the big top. The exhibition includes paintings by Jon Corbino, Ogden Pleissner and Everett Shinn.

 

Images of circus cars, animals and acrobats were also used to market food products during the 1930s. The Beech-Nut Packing Company was one of the companies to use the excitement and nostalgia of the circus to sell its products. They created magazine ads with clowns and circus animals to sell their gum.

 

This circus-themed marketing campaign culminated in the creation of Beech-Nut miniature circuses that traveled across the country in busses, and a miniature circus was displayed in their pavilion at the New York World’s Fair in 1939.

To tell us more about the exhibit we welcome Art Historian Karal Ann Marling and Museum Director and Curator Diane Forsberg.

  In today’s Congressional Corner, Matt Funiciello, the Green Party candidate in New York’s 21st district, concludes his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock. 

Carolyn Parkhurst has explored different aspects of family and suburban life in her three previous novels, Dogs of Babel, Lost and Found, and The Nobodies Album. Her fourth novel, Harmony, traces how a family copes with a special-needs child.

The Hammonds of Washington, D.C., are rapidly outgrowing the city’s resources for helping their oldest daughter. Tilly may be a genius, but she’s also socially alienated and increasingly hard to control. Unsure even of a diagnosis, the family heads to New Hampshire to try unconventional treatment, an experiment which tests all the Hammonds in unforeseen ways.

Suzanna Hermans from Oblong Books and Music joins us with this week's Book Picks list.

List:
Dark Matter by Blake Crouch
Heroes of the Frontier by Dave Eggers
Goodnight, Beautiful Women by Anna Noyes
The Hand That Feeds You by A.J. Rich
Departure by A.G. Riddle
Dragonfish by Vu Tran
Ms. Bixby's Last Day by John David Anderson
Beware That Girl by Teresa Toten

8/2/16 Panel

Aug 2, 2016

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Zika: The Emerging Epidemic book cover
Zika: The Emerging Epidemic

We've all heard plenty about the Zika virus by now, but it's hard to know how worried to be. What are our chances of getting it? Should we postpone travel plans? Donald G. McNeil Jr. is a science writer for the New York Times, and he attempts to answer those questions and more in his new book Zika: The Emerging Epidemic.

Linda Fairstein was chief of the Sex Crimes Unit of the district attorney's office in Manhattan for more than two decades and is America's foremost legal expert on sexual assault and domestic violence. Her Alexandra Cooper novels are international bestsellers and have been translated into more than a dozen languages.

Her latest is Killer Look.

New York City is one of the fashion capitals of the world, well-known for its glamour and style.  Nowhere is this more apparent than on the runway, where American haute couture continually astounds with its creativity, daring, and innovation in the name of beauty.  Yet high fashion means high stakes, as Alex Cooper quickly discovers when businessman and designer Wolf Savage is found dead in an apparent suicide, mere days before the biggest show of his career.

  The debate over immigration reform has moved from a path to citizenship to a 1,000-mile wall.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Matt Funiciello, the Green Party candidate in New York’s 21st district, continues his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock. 

Scott Sharrard
Scott Sharrard

The guitar virtuoso Scott Sharrard is spending a good bit of time in our region over the next few weeks, and it’s a chance to hear one of the best working axmen on the road today. The music director for the Gregg Allman band, which he joined in 2008, Sharrard has also toured and recorded with The Chesterfields and as a solo artist. Right now, he’s touring with the Brickyard Band. Sharrard will play the Athens Summer Concert series in Greene County on Friday; the Madison Theater in Albany on Saturday, and the Falcon in Marlboro, NY October 14th. With Gregg Allman, Sharrard is back in Albany August 24 at the Times Union Center and in Hartford a week later.

Government aid doesn’t always go where it’s supposed to. Foster care agencies team up with companies to take disability and survivor benefits from abused and neglected children. States and their revenue consultants use illusory schemes to siphon Medicaid funds intended for children and the poor into general state coffers. Child support payments for foster children and families on public assistance are converted into government revenue. And the poverty industry keeps expanding, leaving us with nursing homes and juvenile detention centers that sedate residents to reduce costs and maximize profit, local governments buying nursing homes to take the facilities’ federal aid while the elderly languish with poor care, and counties hiring companies to mine the poor for additional funds in modern day debtor’s prisons.

In The Poverty Industry, Daniel L. Hatcher shows us how state governments and their private industry partners are profiting from the social safety net, turning America’s most vulnerable populations into sources of revenue.

8/1/16 Panel

Aug 1, 2016

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Paul Lewis
Molina Visuals

  Renowned English pianist Paul Lewis joins Andris Nelsons and the instrumental Fellows of the Tanglewood Music Center Orchestra on Sunday, July 31, for the annual Leonard Bernstein Memorial Concert. The all-Brahms program opens with the Piano Concerto No. 1.

Tonight at 6 p.m. in Ozawa Hall, Mr. Lewis will perform Schubert’s Fantasia in F minor for piano four hands with pianist Jonathan Biss, and Mozart’s Piano Quartet No. 2 during a prelude concert with members of the BSO. Prelude concerts are free to ticket holders for the evening’s program.  

  Stephanie Blythe is on the vocal faculty for the Tanglewood Music Center, and has been coaching vocal Fellows for the “Sing America: Songs of Travel” vocal concert at 5 p.m. during Tanglewood on Parade.

The program features the TMC Vocal Fellows and Stephanie singing mostly classic American travel songs from the largely from the late 1800’s and early 1900s, including “Meet Me in St. Louis, Louis,” “California, Here I Come,” “Caroline in the Morning,” “Meet Me Tonight in Dreamland,” and “I Want to Go Back to Michigan.” The audience will also be encouranged to sing along during a portion of the program.

Mezzo-soprano Stephanie Blythe is considered to be one of the most highly respected and critically acclaimed artists of her generation.

Allyn Burrows and Tod Randolph in 'Or,' at Shakespeare & Company, 2016.
Ava G. Lindenmaier

  Liz Duffy Adams' playful comedy Or, is based on the real life of Britain's first female playwright Aphra Behn.

The production runs through September 4 in Shakespeare & Company’s Tina Packer Playhouse and is staged in-the-round. Alice Reagan is the director and she joins us along with actors Tod Randolph and Allyn Burrows.

Andris Nelsons
Marco Borggreve

  Andris Nelsons is Music Director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and he was announced as music director of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, commencing in the 2017/18 season. With both appointments, and in leading a pioneering alliance between these two esteemed institutions, Andris Nelsons is widely considered as one of the most renowned and innovative conductors on the international scene today.

Nelsons made his BSO debut in March 2011, leading Mahler’s Symphony no. 9 at Carnegie Hall. In summer 2012, Nelsons made his debut in here at Tanglewood. Nelsons began his tenure as Music Director of the Boston Symphony Orchestra in the 2014/15 season and after one year in Boston his contract was extended through the 2021/22 season.

Maestro Nelsons will lead performances of Mahler’s Symphony No. 9 tonight, Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7 tomorrow night and an all-Brahms program with pianist Paul Lewis.

  The man behind the music is the BSO’s Artistic Administrator, Tony Fogg. Tony was born in Australia and was trained as a pianist at the Brazilian Academy of Music in Sao Paulo and at the University of Sydney.

His career has combined performance with arts administration, and, in both aspects of his work, he has been a strong champion of contemporary composers

The Danish String Quartet
Caroline Bittencourt

    

  The Danish String Quartet, one of the most lauded classical ensembles today, is in great demand by classical concert and festival presenters alike. Their outstanding level of musicianship and command of whatever repertoire they happen to play is truly at the forefront of classical music in the 21st century.

Renowned globally for their outstanding level of musical refinement and lush interpretations of classical, contemporary, and folk traditions, offer programs featuring elegant and nuanced compositions of the 21st century, as well as the classics.

They played in Ozawa Hall here at Tanglewood last night and will play the Caramoor Festival in Katonah, NY tonight and Maverick Concerts in Woodstock, NY on Sunday. The Danish String Quartet members are: Asbjorn Norgaard, Rune Tonsgaard Sorensen, Frekrik Schoyen Sjolin, and Frederik Oland.

Ken-David Masur
Beth Ross Buckley

  When Tanglewood goes on Parade – as it will this coming Tuesday - it takes many conductors to make it all happen.

This morning we meet one of the five conductors who will be performing in the Shed. Ken-David Masur is the Assistant Conductor of the BSO as well as being the Associate Conductor of the San Diego Symphony and Principal Guest Conductor of the Munich Symphony.

Masur studied conducting mainly with his father, the great Kurt Masur, and was a conducting fellow at Tanglewood in July 2012 when he made an auspicious BSO debut sharing conducting duties on an all-Mozart program with his father, who was recovering from an injury. His father passed away in December.

Ken-David Masur is an alum of the Boston University Tanglewood Institute which is celebrating its 50th year and will have an anniversary concert at Tanglewood on August 6th.

garden at Tanglewood
Sarah LaDuke

    Tanglewood is a name that's recognized around the world. Just about every time we interview a conductor or musician, they mention the venue's reputation and cache.

That doesn't just happen by accident. There's a hard-working team of professionals that keeps Tanglewood on the lips of both audience-members and performers.

And, it is quite a season that gets underway tonight. To give us a State of Tanglewood report – we welcome back our friend Mark Volpe – the Managing Director of the BSO.

Seiji Ozawa Hall at Tanglewood
Sarah LaDuke

  We begin our broadcast from Tanglewood with a check-in on Berkshire headlines with our man from the Berkshire Eagle, Kevin Moran. Kevin is the regional Vice President of News for New England Newspapers.


  Michael Mayer is the Tony-Award winning director of plays, musicals, opera, and film and television who helmed the Broadway revival of Hedwig and The Angry Inch, and the original runs of the musicals of Everyday Rapture, American Idiot, Spring Awakening, and Thoroughly Modern Millie. He’s also directed revivals of A View From the Bridge, The Lion in Winter, After the Fall, and ‘night Mother. His breakthrough of sorts was Side Man.

 

Side Man had an early production in Poughkeepsie, NY at Vassar College and New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater -- it moved to off-Off-Broadway and then to Broadway winning the Tony Award for Best Play in 1999.

 

Michael Mayer has been coming back to Poughkeepsie in the summer for 20 years, working on shows in various stages of development and recently joining the New York Stage and Film board of directors.

He was in the Hudson Valley this summer working on a new musical entitled Head Over Heels which blends Sir Philip Sidney’s The Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia with the music of seminal 80s girl-group, The Go-Go’s. Jeff Whitty is writing the book and Tom Kitt will provide musical supervision.

  Obie-Award winning performance group, The Secret City, will be playing their third annual gathering in Woodstock, NY this Sunday - July 31st at 12 noon. The theme will be PLAY.

The Secret City is the brainchild of impresario and Byrdcliffe Resident, Chris Wells, who moved to Woodstock three years ago and felt the small town with its cultural history, inclusiveness and love of community were a perfect setting for this tribal art gathering.

The Secret City combines art, food, music, storytelling, meditation, singing, performance and community interaction in an event that is part tent revival, part ceremony, part salon.

For their Woodstock gathering they’ll present musical guest Eric Redd, visual art by Jacinta Bunnell, roller derby troupe The Hudson Valley Horrors, food offering by LaGusta of New Paltz, a performance by Percussion Orchestra of Kingston and Energy Dance Company, a reading by Martha Frankel, songs by The Secret City Singers and The Secret City Band and a story by Chris Wells. We welcome Chris and artist Jacinta Bunnell.

  In today’s Congressional Corner, Matt Funiciello, the Green Party candidate in New York’s 21st district, concludes his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock. 

  Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

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