The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

 WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9 a.m. to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge, Lin-Manuel Miranda and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org

The Roundtable is also available as a podcast.  Subscribe today!

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Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

11:10 - Earth Wise

Book Picks lists are here.

You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

Allan Lichtman is a political historian and Distinguished Professor of History at American University. Lichtman predicts that an impeachment investigation will be launched and lays out the factors that, he believes, will lead to Trump’s removal from office.

From Robert Mueller’s Russia inquiry, to President Trump’s foreign policy moves and conflicts of interest– not to mention his Twitter account – Lichtman warns that Trump’s rogue presidency is approaching a critical mass of violations that could trigger his impeachment – but only if the American people demand it. 

Lichtman’s new book, “The Case for Impeachment,” contains new material assessing how Trump’s first year in office has strengthened the case for his impeachment, and explaining exactly how he could be removed from office. 

The 2018 elections will tell us a lot about 2020.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney, a Democrat from the 18th district, continues his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

  Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: "The Post"

Upcoming:
Tracy Grammer: CD Release Show - Caffe Lena, Saratoga Springs, Thursday 1/18, 7 PM
Town of Great Barrington W.E.B. Du Bois 150th Festival Kickoff - Featuring the one-man play, “W.E.B. Du Bois: A Man for All Times” - Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Mass., Friday 1/19, 6 PM
Susan Werner - The Eighth Step at Proctors, Schenectady, Friday 1/19, 7:30 PM
"Love, B: The Letters of Lt. Basil Beebe Elmer" – Dramatic Reading - (related to the exhibit "A Spirit of Sacrifice: New York State in the First World War”) - New York State Museum Huxley Theater, Albany, Saturday 1/20, 1 PM
Scott Bradlee’s Postmodern Jukebox - Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Troy, Saturday 1/20, 8 PM
Quindar (Mikael Jorgensen & James Merle Thomas) - MASS MoCA Hunter Center, North Adams, Mass., Saturday 1/20, 8 PM
Dust Bowl Faeries - Helsinki Hudson Ballroom Stage, Hudson, Sunday 1/21, 6 PM
Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure - Palace Theatre, Albany, Monday 1/22, 7 PM
Ephraim Asili: Inheritance (Work in Progress) - EMPAC Theater, RPI, Troy, Tuesday 1/23, 7 PM

New movies: "Phantom Thread," "12 Strong," "Den of Thieves"

1/18/18 Panel

Jan 18, 2018

       The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Daily Freeman Publisher Emeritus Ira Fusfeld and Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois.

In this sweeping history of popular music in the United States, NPR’s acclaimed music critic examines how popular music shapes fundamental American ideas and beliefs, allowing us to communicate difficult emotions and truths about our most fraught social issues, most notably sex and race.

In Good Booty, Ann Powers explores how popular music became America’s primary erotic art form. Powers takes us from nineteenth-century New Orleans through dance-crazed Jazz Age New York to the teen scream years of mid-twentieth century rock-and-roll to the cutting-edge adventures of today’s web-based pop stars. Drawing on her deep knowledge and insights on gender and sexuality, Powers recounts stories of forbidden lovers, wild shimmy-shakers, orgasmic gospel singers, countercultural perverts, soft-rock sensitivos, punk Puritans, and the cyborg known as Britney Spears to illuminate how eroticism—not merely sex, but love, bodily freedom, and liberating joy—became entwined within the rhythms and melodies of American song. This cohesion, she reveals, touches the heart of America's anxieties and hopes about race, feminism, marriage, youth, and freedom.

Ann Powers is NPR Music's critic and correspondent. She writes for NPR's music news blog, The Record, and she can be heard on NPR's newsmagazines and music programs.

Zankel Center at Skidmore College
robertdavisllc.com

The Battenkill Chorale opens its 23rd season with Giuseppe Verdi’s monumental Requiem for soloists, chorus, and 48-piece orchestra with two performances on Saturday and Sunday, January 20th  and 21st at 3pm at Skidmore College’s Zankel Music Center in Saratoga Springs, NY.

The Battenkill Chorale, a 110-voice unauditioned chorus from six counties in New York, Massachusetts, and Vermont, was founded twenty-three years ago by Artistic Director Janet McGhee.

David DeSteno is a professor of psychology at Northeastern University, where he directs the Social Emotions Group. He is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science and the American Psychological Association, for which he serves as editor-in-chief of the journal Emotion.

His book, "Emotional Success" provides an accessible and powerful path to grit: our prosocial emotions. These feelings – gratitude, compassion and pride – are easier to generate than the willpower and self-denial that underpin traditional approaches to grit. And, while willpower is quickly depleted, prosocial emotions actually become stronger the more we use them. These emotions have another crucial advantage: they’re contagious.

What will happen to the Dreamers?

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney, a Democrat from the 18th district, speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Founded in 1970, the New York State Summer School of the Arts (NYSSSA) is a highly-competitive summer arts residential program funded by the New York State Education Department and student tuition. The four week, pre-professional summer curriculum includes individual and group instruction designed to help each student explore and develop their talents in ballet, choral studies, modern dance, visual arts, media arts, orchestral studies, or theatre.

Molly Hennighausen is the Executive Director of the New York State Summer School of the Arts.

1/17/18 Panel

Jan 17, 2018

     The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois, Dean of International Studies at Bard College James Ketterer and Berkshire Eagle Reporter Jenn Smith.

smart city graphic
http://realtyplusmag.com

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to tell us the latest technology when it comes to smart homes and smart cities - and how that "smartness" is powered.

Jesse Feiler is an app developer, author, and consultant specializing in small business and nonprofit organizations. His most recent books are “The Nonprofit Risk Book: Finding and Managing Risk in Nonprofits and NGOs” written with Gail B. Nayowith and “Learn Computer Science with Swift.” His most recent apps are “CyberContinuity,” a free app to learn about your vulnerabilities and “The Nonprofit Risk App,” a companion to the book.

  This week's Book Picks come from Connie Brooks and Kate Reid of Battenkill Books in Cambridge, NY.

List:

"The Good People" by Hannah Kent
"The Dry" by Jane Harper
"The Stowaway: A Young Man's Extraordinary Adventure to Antarctica" by Laurie Gwen Shapiro
"Craeft: An Inquiry Into the Origins and True Meaning of Traditional Crafts" by Alexander Langlands
"Love" by Matt de la Pena, illustrated by Loren Long
"Be A King: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Dream for You" by Carole Boston Weatherford, illustrated by James E. Ransome
"A Place to Start a Family: Poems about Creatures that Build" by David L. Harrison, illustrated by Giles Laroche

Al Gini and Book Cover - The Importance of Being Funny
The Main Edge

When E. B. White said “analyzing humor is like dissecting a frog; few people are interested and the frog dies,” he hadn’t seen Al Gini’s hilarious, incisive, and informative take on jokes, joke-telling, and the jokers who tell jokes. For Gini, humor is more than just foolish fun: it serves as a safety valve for dealing with reality that gives us the courage to endure that which we cannot understand or avoid. Not everyone tells jokes. Not everyone gets a joke, even a good one. But, Gini argues, joke-telling can act as both a sword and a shield to defend us from reality. As the late, great stand-up comic Joan Rivers put it: ‘If you can laugh at it, you can live with it!’ 

Al Gini is a Professor of Business Ethics at the Quinlan School of Business at Loyola University Chicago. For over twenty-seven years he was the Resident Philosopher on National Public Radio’s Chicago affiliate, WBEZ-FM, and can currently be heard on WGN/Tribune Radio. His newest book is The Importance of Being Funny: Why We Need More Jokes In Our Lives.

Sexual harassment and gender discrimination have been met with a grassroots response in the #MeToo moment. In this climate, WNYC is presenting "Beyond #MeToo," four one-hour conversations focused on what we need to do as a society to remedy widespread sexual harassment.

The four-part broadcast will cover the workplace, corrective responses, how we are raising and educating our children in this environment and how men can play a role in the solution.

The guests and their perspectives will be extremely broad and diverse. Listeners can expect to hear from teens and parents, politicians and artists, corporate leaders and blue-collar workers.

The series will air from January 23-26 at 11AM during the Roundtable next week. Jami Floyd is the Host Of "All Things Considered” for WNYC Radio and will be hosting the first night of four national roundtables called “Beyond #MeToo.” She joins us with a preview. 

The series will air from January 23-26 at 11AM during The Roundtable next week. 

1/16/18 Panel

Jan 16, 2018

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois and the Empire Report’s JP Miller.

Environmentalists have not welcomed the Trump agenda.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Congressman Richard Neal, a Democrat from the first district, wraps up his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock. 

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

This week we focus on the St. Paul’s Center in Rensselaer. They have provided shelter and support services for over 11 years to more than 2,300 mothers and children who are without a place to call home. Over the last three years, they have expanded services to include rapid rehousing and scattered site permanent supportive housing, allowing them to serve even more families in more impactful ways. Tracy Picher is the executive director.

1/15/18 Panel

Jan 15, 2018

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois, and Political Consultant Libby Post.

Sam Wasson is the author of five books including the best-selling "Fosse" and "Fifth Avenue, 5 AM: Audrey Hepburn, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, and the Dawn of the Modern Woman."

His new book, "Improv Nation," shares the history of a uniquely American art form that has never been more popular.

At the height of the McCarthy era, an experimental theater troupe set up shop in a bar near the University of Chicago. Via word-of-mouth, astonished crowds packed the ad-hoc venue to see its unscripted, interactive, consciousness-raising style. From this unlikely seed grew the Second City, the massively influential comedy theater troupe, and its offshoots—the Groundlings, Upright Citizens Brigade, "SNL," and a slew of others.

This weekend the falconers of the Upper Hudson Valley host not only to their colleagues, but also a broader community that they interact with daily. This weekend long “meet” serves as a celebration of falconry and the region that boasts some of the best landscapes one could hope for while endeavoring in such a pursuit.

The  Martin Luther King, Jr. Weekend Falconry Meet starts today and runs through Sunday.

We are joined by Leigh Foster, Master Falconer; Jeremy Chamberlain, General Falconer; and Jenna Woginrich, Apprentice Falconer.

For more information email Leigh Foster: lfoster5191@gmail.com.

“Fire and Fury” has had Washington buzzing.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Congressman Richard Neal, a Democrat from the first district, continues his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock. 

"Goddess of Anarchy" recounts the formidable life of the militant writer, orator, and agitator Lucy Parsons. Born to an enslaved woman in Virginia in 1851 and raised in Texas-where she met her husband, the Haymarket "martyr" Albert Parsons-Lucy was a fearless advocate of First Amendment rights, a champion of the working classes, and one of the most prominent figures of African descent of her era. And yet, her life was riddled with contradictions-she advocated violence without apology, concocted a Hispanic-Indian identity for herself, and ignored the plight of African Americans.

Jacqueline Jones holds the Ellen C. Temple Chair in Women's History and the Mastin Gentry White Professorship in Southern History at the University of Texas at Austin.

1/12/18 Panel

Jan 12, 2018

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Former EPA Regional Administrator Judith Enck, Siena College Economics Professor Aaron Pacitti and Corporate Attorney Rich Honen.

Brew Your Business

Jan 11, 2018

Craft beer culture and industry have recently grown exponentially with over 4000 craft brewers operating in the United States alone.

The new book: "Brew Your Business: The Ultimate Craft Beer Playbook" incorporates cultural, legal, business, public relations, management, science, networking, and brewing experience into one easily accessible book for everyone wanting to know more about craft beer brewing, tasting, and selling.

Karen McGrath has been researching, writing, and teaching for over 30 years, and has co-authored a book with Regina Luttrell entitled "The Millennial Mindset: Unraveling Fact from Fiction." Sean McGrath is a committed homebrewer with over 20 years of experience and many more years of enthusiasm regarding craft brews.

Regina Luttrell spent the first half of her career managing high-level public relations and marketing activities for Fortune 500 companies, governmental entities, as well as non-profit organizations. She now teaches public relations and social media at Syracuse University, S.I. Newhouse School. Todd Luttrell is a craft beer enthusiast and an accomplished scientist and business professional with nearly 20 years of discovery and leadership experience.

We’re also joined by Mike Wenzel Co-owner and Head Brewer at Helderberg Mountain Brewing Company.

“The Children Are Reading” is a new collection of poetry by Gabriel Fried that takes readers into the magically dark and twisted worlds of children’s literature and children’s imaginations, as well as the fearful fantasies of the adults who care for them.

Gabriel Fried is the author of "Making the New Lamb Take," winner of the Kathryn Morton Prize, which was named a top poetry collection of 2007 by Foreword Reviews and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. He is also the editor of an anthology, "Heart of the Order: Baseball Poems," and longtime poetry editor of Persea Books. He teaches in the creative writing program at the University of Missouri.

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