The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, listener call-ins, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you have any questions or you'd like to be on the show, email us at

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

  Were President Obama’s executive actions on immigration legal?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock the Supreme Court may have to answer that question.

  Featuring classic songs such as “My Girl” and “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough,” the Broadway hit: Motown The Musical is now playing at Proctors in Schenectady through Sunday.

It is the true story of Motown founder Berry Gordy’s journey from featherweight boxer to the heavyweight music mogul who launched the careers of Diana Ross, Michael Jackson, Smokey Robinson and many more.

We meet two of the stars this morning: Jarran Muse plays Marvin Gaye and Syndee Winters portrays Diana Ross.

  At a time when colleagues were hitting their mid-career strides, Steve Lobel was mired in failure. On the brink of bankruptcy, Lobel had no income, no savings, no job, no career-and, it seemed, no future. The business he had purchased twenty months earlier had collapsed, a misfortune he had brought largely on himself by breaking every rule of sound business.

This was the same man who a few years before had opened the gourmet market Cowan & Lobel in Albany, New York, only to lose the store at the height of its success.

11/18/15 Panel

Nov 18, 2015

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Joan Marcus

  The Roundabout Theatre Company in New York City is celebrating its 50th Anniversary this year and we are highlighting its work this week.

Roundabout produces work both on and Off-Broadway and at its Off-Broadway theater, The Laura Pels, Roundabout is currently presenting The Humans, a new play by Stephen Karam. Directed by Joe Mantello the show has announced a move from off to on Broadway next Spring -- with its current ensemble cast intact.

In the play, we join The Blakes - a solid Scranton family - as they celebrate Thanksgiving in their youngest daughter’s apartment in New York City. The family dynamic is strained and real. Karam’s writing is crisp, emotional, flip, and funny. The matriarch and patriarch of the family are played by Jane Houdyshell and Reed Birney, respectively.

Listener Essay - Into November

Nov 17, 2015

  Deb Smith is an Associate Professor at Empire State College. She lives in Albany and often drives across Vermont and western Massachusetts.

Into November

November can be a season dominated by subdued shades of gray and brown across the land. There are times when (dare I say it?) the month of November begs for the forgiving beauty of the first flakes of snow. To my surprise though, this year’s autumn color continued from October right into November.

Richard Goldstein didn’t set out to be a literary pioneer — as a young man, he simply found himself drawn to Greenwich Village from his Bronx project where a new generation of young people was changing popular culture.

Everyone seemed to make nice at the recent Netanyahu-Obama sitdown.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays delves into the relationship with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

  What does it take to succeed? This question has fueled a long running debate. Some have argued that humans are a fundamentally competitive, and that pursuing self-interest is the best way to get ahead. Others claim that humans are born to cooperate and that we are most successful when we collaborate with others.