The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

  WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org

Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

John Faso
John Faso

Republicans say the Affordable Care Act is going away.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Republican Congressman-elect John Faso of New York’s 19th district tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock what might take its place.

Peak Joel McHale

Dec 13, 2016

For years, Joel McHale’s stand-up performances have sold out venues across the country, and his role in the beloved cult series Community and as the host of E!’s The Soup have made him a household name in comedy and pop culture.

He currently stars in the new CBS comedy The Great Indoors which is about an adventure reporter for an outdoor magazine when he becomes the desk-bound boss to a team of millennials in the magazine's digital department. 

McHale's submission to the vast world of celebrity tell-all books is Thanks for the Money: How to Use My Life Story to Become the Best Joel McHale You Can Be.

12/13/16 Panel

Dec 13, 2016

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of the Times Union Mike Spain, and Communications Specialist Theresa Bourgeois.

George Mitchell knows how to bring peace to troubled regions. He was the primary architect of the 1998 Good Friday Agreement for peace in Northern Ireland. But when he served as US Special Envoy for Middle East Peace from 2009 to 2011—working to end the Israeli-Palestinian conflict—diplomacy did not prevail.

In A Path to Peace: A Brief History of Israeli-Palestinian Negotiations and a Way Forward in the Middle East, Mitchell offers his insider account of how the Israelis and the Palestinians have progressed (and regressed) in their negotiations through the years and outlines the specific concessions each side must make to finally achieve lasting peace.

In his new show at The Lionheart Gallery in Pound Ridge, N.Y., “Kings & Queens of Late Night,” running through January 2nd, “recovering lawyer” Geoffrey Stein paints collage portraits of an all-star cast of network and cable comedy and punditry.

Stein’s Lionheart Gallery lineup of the late night heroes who wield wit and humor like surgical scalpels includes Jon Stewart, Jay Leno, Amy Schumer, Jimmy Fallon, Chelsea Handler, Samantha Bee, Larry Wilmore, Bill Maher, John Oliver, Trevor Noah, Stephen Colbert and David Letterman.

Examples from this exhibit include Jon Stewart’s portrait made with the 9/11 Responders’ act he championed, Amy Schumer done with her cousin Chuck Schumer’s Gun Control bill, Jimmy Fallon created from thank you cards, and John Oliver done with USA Today and the London Tube Map.

Stein, who lives and works in New York City, received an MFA from the Slade School of Fine Art in London and has been painting full-time since 2000. 

John Faso
John Faso

In the New Year, Republicans will be sitting pretty in Washington.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Republican Congressman-elect John Faso of New York’s 19th district sits down with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Today we will learn about Operation Snip, an organization that focuses on TNR (trap-neuter-return) for community cats (otherwise known as feral cats) which live in alleys and vacant buildings throughout Troy and the capital district.

Lynn Kopka is the founder of Operation Snip.

12/12/16 Panel

Dec 12, 2016

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Political Consultant Libby Post and Communications Specialist Theresa Bourgeois.

J.M.W. Turner is one of the most important figures in Western art, and his visionary work paved the way for a revolution in landscape painting. Over the course of his lifetime, Turner strove to liberate painting from an antiquated system of patronage. Bringing a new level of expression and color to his canvases, he paved the way for the modern artist.

Franny Moyle studied Art History at St John's College, Cambridge. She enjoyed a career in arts programming at the BBC that culminated in her becoming the corporation's first Commissioner for Arts and Culture. She is now a freelance executive producer and writer and lives in east London. Her new book is Turner: The Extraordinary Life and Momentous Times of J.M.W. Turner.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, we continue to learn about the music of Thea Musgrave.

The Hyde Collection presents the 80th anniversary of the Artists of the Mohawk Hudson Region. The Hyde marks this special occasion with a campus-wide exhibition juried by Michael Oatman, artist and associate professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. Beyond work for The Hyde’s Wood Gallery, this year, Oatman and the Museum accepted proposals for interventions in Hyde House as well as sculptures on the grounds.

The Mohawk Hudson Regional provides a leading benchmark for contemporary art in the Upper Hudson Valley, and artists living within a 100-mile radius of Glens Falls and the Capital Region are invited to submit works for the juror’s consideration. Founded in 1936, Artists of the Mohawk-Hudson Region is the oldest running regional juried show in the country. 

Oatman is known for his large-scale collages and installations integrating found, modified, and handmade components, including artifacts of material culture, painting, drawing, and video. He has exhibited extensively in the United States and abroad. 

The exhibition is on view through December 31, 2016. 

John Faso
John Faso

Upstate New York’s 19th House district is getting a new representative.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Republican John Faso sits down with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Saxophonist Steve Wilson, Pianist Helen Sung, Bassist Ira Coleman are teaming up for a concert tonight at Massry Center at the College of St. Rose

Steve Wilson joins us. 

12/9/16 Panel

Dec 9, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Communications Specialist Theresa Bourgeois, and author and activist, Barbara Smith.

The New York State Writers Institute will present a 30th Anniversary Screening of the film, Ironweed, tomorrow night at UAlbany's Page Hall.

Adapted for the screen by William Kennedy from his Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, Ironweed was filmed at several Albany locations and brought international attention to the Capital Region and earned Oscar nominations for both Jack Nicholson and Meryl Streep.

The screening will begin at 7PM and will feature a 6:30 conversation between William Kennedy and Marion Roach.

Gun control is one of the most polarizing political issues.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Congresswoman-elect Claudia Tenney of New York’s 22nd district concludes her discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Shawn Stone, Digital Editor of The Alt joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

12/8/16 Panel

Dec 8, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Communications Specialist Theresa Bourgeois, and former Executive Editor of the Poughkeepsie Journal Stu Shinske.

Camelot At TheRep

Dec 7, 2016
Camelot Leenya Rideout as Guineviere, Oliver Thornton as Lancelot, and Kevin McGuire as King Arthur
Douglas C. Liebig / Optimum Exposure Photography

Camelot, one of America’s most beloved musicals, is now playing at Capital Rep in Albany through Christmas Eve. The four-time Tony Award-winning musical has one of the richest scores of the Broadway songbook.

This lusty, romantic tale is sure to inspire audiences with a celebrated score that includes the classics “If Ever I Would Leave You,” “The Simple Joys of Maidenhood,” “How to Handle a Woman” and the title song, “Camelot.”

We welcome two of the cast-members this morning: Jane Pfitsch and Leenya Rideout.

  On the seventy-fifth anniversary, the authors of Pulitzer Prize finalist The Eleventh Day unravel the mysteries of Pearl Harbor to expose the scapegoating of the admiral who was in command the day 2,000 Americans died, report on the continuing struggle to restore his lost honor—and clear President Franklin D. Roosevelt of the charge that he knew the attack was coming.

The Japanese onslaught on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 devastated Americans and precipitated entry into World War II. In the aftermath, Admiral Husband Kimmel, Commander-in-Chief of the Pacific Fleet, was relieved of command, accused of negligence and dereliction of duty—publicly disgraced.

The America we live in today was born, not on July 4, 1776, but on December 7, 1941, when an armada of 354 Japanese warplanes supported by aircraft carriers, destroyers, and midget submarines suddenly and savagely attacked the United States, killing 2,403 men—and forced America’s entry into World War II. Pearl Harbor: From Infamy to Greatness follows, moment by moment, the sailors, soldiers, pilots, diplomats, admirals, generals, emperor, and president as they engineer, fight, and react to this stunningly dramatic moment in world history.

Beginning in 1914, bestselling author Craig Nelson maps the road to war, beginning with Franklin D. Roosevelt, then the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (and not yet afflicted with polio), attending the laying of the keel of the USS Arizona at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Writing with vivid intimacy, Nelson traces Japan’s leaders as they lurch into ultranationalist fascism, which culminates in their insanely daring yet militarily brilliant scheme to terrify America with one of the boldest attacks ever waged. Within seconds, the country would never be the same.

Congresswoman-elect Claudia Tenney is leaving the state Assembly as she heads to the U.S. House.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tenney continues her discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

12/7/16 Panel

Dec 7, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Political Consultant Libby Post and Corporate Attorney Rich Honen.

William W. Goldsmith is Professor Emeritus of City and Regional Planning at Cornell University. He is coauthor of Separate Societies: Poverty and Inequality in U.S. Cities.

In his new book, Saving Our Cities, William W. Goldsmith shows how cities can be places of opportunity rather than places with problems. With strongly revived cities and suburbs, working as places that serve all their residents, metropolitan areas will thrive, thus making the national economy more productive, the environment better protected, the citizenry better educated, and the society more reflective, sensitive, and humane.

Today's Book Picks come from Matt Tannenbaum from The Bookstore in Lenox, MA.

The Last Innocents by Michael Leahy
Have I Got a Story for You edited by Ezra Gentler
How to Grow Old by Cicero
Moscow Nights by Nigel Cliff
Shanghai Grand by Taras Grescoe
The Perfect Horse by Elizabeth Letts
The Mistletoe Murder by P.D. James
Lyrics 1961-2012 by Bob Dylan

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