The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, listener call-ins, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you have any questions or you'd like to be on the show, email us at roundtable@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

  Shawn Stone, formerly the Arts Editor of the late Metroland, returns to our show after a brief absence to tell us about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region. 

  As voting begins in a few days in the 2016 Presidential Campaign, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders may be the least political person in politics. But, he is leading Hillary Clinton in many polls. He’s closed the fundraising gap, and is drawing crowds of thousands to campaign rallies. Why?

With reporting from inside the campaign, personal relationships with Sanders’s friends and colleagues, and meticulous research, reporter Harry Jaffe offers a portrait of the ultimate outsider candidate, charting Sanders’s course from Brooklyn to Burlington, and now to Des Moines and beyond.

Harry Jaffe is a journalist covering Washington, DC—its politics, its crime, its heroes and villains. His new book is Why Bernie Sanders Matters.

1/28/16 Panel

Jan 28, 2016

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Seth Grahame-Smith - Pride & Prejudice & Zombies

Jan 27, 2016

We all know the story of Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. Darcy, and the regency era prejudices of the classes in Jane Austen’s Pride & Prejudice. We know that Elizabeth is quick tongued, Lady Catherine de Bough is cutting in her opinions of those lesser than her (which is pretty must everyone), and Mr. Wickham is quite devious in his motives. But what if you give Austen’s novel a twist? Say zombies.

  This year’s Ice Harvest Festival at Hanford Mills Museum in East Meredith, NY is Saturday, February 6 from 10 am – 4 pm.

Using historic tools, children and adults can walk out on the frozen mill pond to cut and maneuver blocks of ice. The ice blocks are pushed up a ramp and then loaded onto sleds, which are hauled to a traditional ice house. Ice harvesting will take place all day, and visitors also can take part in a variety of indoor and outdoor activities.

Here to tell us more: Hanford Mills Museum’s executive director, Liz Callahan.

  The Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, NY opened two new exhibitions this month, Norman Rockwell in the 1960s, and 60 from the 60s: Selections from the George Eastman Museum.

The Rockwell show features 21 illustrations and original magazine covers by Rockwell, the Eastman show features photographs – both explore the turbulent decade that marked the generational changes in America during the 1960s.

Erin Coe is the Director of The Hyde Collection.

  In five days, the polls and prognostications can go out the window: voters are finally going to caucus in Iowa.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that former New York Senator Hillary Clinton remains his firm choice. 

  E. J. Dionne's new book, Why the Right Went Wrong, offers a historical view of the right since the 1960s. Its core contention is that American conservatism and the Republican Party took a wrong turn when they adopted Barry Goldwater’s worldview during and after the 1964 campaign.

The radicalism of today’s conservatism is not the product of the Tea Party. The Tea Partiers are the true heirs to Goldwater ideology. The purity movement did more than drive moderates out of the Republican Party—it beat back alternative definitions of conservatism.

The state of the Republican party, controlled by the strictest base, is diminished. It has become white and older in a country that is no longer that. It needs to come back to life for its own health and that of the country’s, and in Why the Right Went Wrong, Dionne explains how.

1/27/16 Panel

Jan 27, 2016

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Pages