The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, listener call-ins, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you have any questions or you'd like to be on the show, email us at roundtable@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

1/22/16 Panel

Jan 22, 2016

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  The Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College is celebrating its Fifteenth Anniversary year with a Spring Opening Celebration on Saturday, February 6th, featuring three new exhibitions and a dialogue about the work and legacy of the artist Alma Thomas, and a concert on Thursday, February 18, featuring the acclaimed Bang on a Can All-Stars in a performance that will include a new work commissioned by Jack Shear and the Tang for the occasion.

The shows opening on 2/6 are Alma Thomas, Borrowed Light: Selections from the Jack Shear Gift, and Elevator Music 30: Critter & Guitari.

Ian Berry is the Dayton Director at The Tang and he joins us now. 

  As the adage goes: home is where the heart is. This may seem self-explanatory, but none of our close primate cousins have anything like homes. Whether we live in an igloo or in Buckingham Palace, the fact that Homo sapiens create homes is one of the greatest puzzles of our evolution.

In Home: How Habitat Made Us Human, neuroanthropologist John S. Allen marshals evidence from evolutionary anthropology, neuroscience, the study of emotion, and modern sociology to argue that the home is one of the most important cognitive, technological, and cultural products of our species’ evolution. It is because we have homes—relatively secure against whatever horrors lurk outside—that human civilizations have been able to achieve the periods of explosive cultural and creative progress that are our species’ hallmark.

Photo of Congressman Peter Welch
http://www.welch.house.gov/about-peter/

  Prescription drugs: they can be a constant source of worry for many Americans.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont representative Peter Welch talks about some possible solutions with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Marie Rutkoski - The Winner's Crime

Jan 21, 2016

Marie Rutkoski enthralled readers with the first book in The Winner’s Trilogy, The Winner’s Curse, where she created a world of secrets and lies, juxtaposed with the backdrop of a luxurious upper class that takes delight in war games and the servitude of the lower class and slaves.

The second book in the series, The Winner’s Crime, took us to the palace of the Emperor – where a royal wedding was to take place, and right when the reader thought they knew what was coming, they realized they didn’t – enter cliffhanger. So, now the third book in the series, The Winner’s Kiss, will hit the shelves in March, and we thought we’d catch up with Rutkoski in anticipation of its release.


  In The Geography of Genius, acclaimed travel writer Eric Weiner sets out to examine the connection between our surroundings and our most innovative ideas. He explores the history of places, like Vienna of 1900, Renaissance Florence, ancient Athens, Song Dynasty Hangzhou, and Silicon Valley, to show how certain urban settings are conducive to ingenuity. 

Eric Weiner is a former NPR correspondent and the author of the New York Times bestseller The Geography of Bliss and the critically acclaimed Man Seeks God.

1/21/16 Panel

Jan 21, 2016

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  Death is something we all confront ― it touches our families, our homes, our hearts. And yet we have grown used to denying its existence, treating it as an enemy to be beaten back with medical advances.

We are living at a unique point in human history. People are living longer than ever, yet the longer we live, the more taboo and alien our mortality becomes. Yet we, and our loved ones, still remain mortal. People today still struggle with this fact, as we have done throughout our entire history. What led us to this point? What drove us to sanitize death and make it foreign and unfamiliar?

In Death's Summer Coat: What the History of Death and Dying Teaches Us About Life and Living, Brandy Schillace shows how talking about death, and the rituals associated with it, can help provide answers.

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