The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

  WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you have any questions or you'd like to be on the show, email us at roundtable@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

6/30/16 Panel

Jun 30, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  The Felice Brothers' new album, Life in the Dark, is out on Yep Roc records and they’re heading out on a huge tour this summer.

We’re lucky to have them playing several spots in the greater WAMC listening region -- they’ll be at Green River Fest in Greenfield, MA on 7/9; Troy Riverfront Park on 7/20, The Catskill Brewery in Livingston Manor, NY on 8/6; and the Falcon Ridge Folk Festival in Hillsdale, NY on 8/7.

We were very excited to have them stop by The Linda to talk about what’s new and play some tunes.

Mississippi plantation owner, the cantankerous Big Daddy, is celebrating his 65th birthday. His family has returned for the occasion, including his favorite son, the masculine Brick, and Brick’s wife, the lonely and longing Maggie.

Brick and Maggie’s strained marriage plagues Big Daddy’s mind, and he demands answers to why they haven’t given him a grandchild yet.

However, Big Daddy’s family holds a powerful secret, and an ulterior motive as to why they have returned to the plantation. The families’ troubled relationships and emotional lies become exposed in the timeless American treasure by Tennessee Williams, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.

Berkshire Theatre Group presents Cat on a Hot Tin Roof as part of their season this summer. The show opened on Saturday after a few previews and runs through July 16th.

We are joined this morning by Rebecca Brooksher and Michael Raymond-James – who play Maggie and Brick on BTG’s Fitzpatrick Stage.

  House Democrats recently shut down the chamber with a daylong sit-in.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Congressman Jim McGovern — a Democrat from the 2nd district — discusses the action with WAMC’s Alan Chartock. 

  Scott Woolley's new book, The Network: The Battle for the Airwaves and the Birth of the Communications Age is the origin story of the airwaves - the foundational technology of the communications age - as told through the forty-year friendship of an entrepreneurial industrialist and a brilliant inventor.

  He is one of the most prolific writers ever with 156 published books that have sold more than 325 million copies worldwide.

James Patterson is on a mission to get even more people to read in this digital age. He is introducing BookShots-- a new line of short and propulsive.

6/29/2016

Jun 29, 2016

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Everybody Behaves Badly
Everybody Behaves Badly

It’s hard to imagine now, but about 90 years ago, Ernest Hemingway was not yet a modern literary master. In fact, he hadn’t even published his first novel. Living in relatively poverty in what would come to be known as the Lost Generation-era Paris, the young husband and father was on the cusp of greatness — but he needed a story. He found one in the fiesta in Pamplona — one that came as a surprise to his cohorts who later found thinly-veiled fictionalized versions of themselves in the pages of The Sun Also Rises. These events are the subject of Lesley Blume’s compelling new book Everybody Behaves Badly: The True Story Behind Hemingway’s Masterpiece The Sun Also Rises.

  Feminism has hit the big time. Once a dirty word brushed away with a grimace, “feminist” has been rebranded as a shiny label sported by movie and pop stars, fashion designers, and multi-hyphenate powerhouses like Beyoncé. It drives advertising and marketing campaigns for everything from wireless plans to underwear to perfume, presenting what’s long been a movement for social justice as just another consumer choice in a vast market. Individual self-actualization is the goal, shopping more often than not the means, and celebrities the mouthpieces.

But what does it mean when social change becomes a brand identity? Feminism’s splashy arrival at the center of today’s media and pop-culture marketplace, after all, hasn’t offered solutions to the movement’s unfinished business.

Andi Zeisler, a founding editor of Bitch Media, draws on more than twenty years’ experience interpreting popular culture in this biting history of how feminism has been co-opted, watered down, and turned into a gyratory media trend in her new book, We Were Feminists Once: From Riot Grrrl to CoverGirl®, the Buying and Selling of a Political Movement.

  What will Great Britain do next?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Massachusetts Congressman Jim McGovern — a Democrat from the 2nd district — discusses the Brexit vote with WAMC’s Alan Chartock. 

Barrington Stage Company’s second St. Germain stage production of this season is Kimberly Akimbo by Pulitzer Prize winner, David Lindsay-Abaire.

Starring Debra Jo Rupp and set in the wilds of suburban New Jersey, Kimberly Akimbo is a hilarious and heartrending play about a teenager with a rare condition causing her body to age faster than normal.

When she and her family flee Secaucus under dubious circumstances, Kimberly is forced to reevaluate her life while contending with a hypochondriac mother, a rarely sober father, a scam-artist aunt, her own mortality and, most terrifying of all, the possibility of first love.

Debra Jo Rupp was last seen at Barrington Stage in Dr. Ruth: All the Way and will return to the St. Germain stage later this season to perform in Love Letters with Mark H. Dold. 

Jacqueline Kellachan from The Golden Notebook in Woodstock, NY joins us with this week's Book Picks.

List:
The Girls: A Novel by Emma Cline
SweetBitter: A Novel by Stephanie
The Second Life of Nick Mason by Steve Hamilton
Joe Gould's Teeth by Jill Lepore
Robert Winthrop Chanler: Discovering The Fantastic edited by Vizcaya Museum and Garden/The Monacelli Press

Events:
"By The Book"with Marshall Karp, Joe Donohue and James Conrad - June 29, 7PM
The Mommy Group by Elizabeth Isadora Gold - July 2, 4PM
Sex Object by Jessica Valenti - July 3, 3PM

6/28/2016

Jun 28, 2016

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

We have probably all seen the movies, TV shows and books which tell the story about lawman Wyatt Earp. But, very few make mention of his wife. Married for nearly 50 years, Josephine Sarah Marcus Earp was beautiful, gusty and Jewish.

Thelma Adams has delved into the life and times of Mrs. Wyatt with her new novel, The Last Woman Standing. At once an epic account of an improbable romance and a retelling of an iconic American tale, The Last Woman Standing recalls the famed gunfight at the O.K. Corral through the eyes of Josephine.

For over two decades, she has penned celebrity features and criticism for high-profile publications. While covering film for the New York Post, Us Weekly, and Yahoo Movies, Thelma Adams became a regular at film festivals from Berlin to Dubai, Toronto to Tribeca. Her debut novel was Playdate and it is always a pleasure to welcome Thelma back to The Roundtable.

  In the early seventeenth century, a crippled, graying, almost toothless veteran of Spain's wars against the Ottoman Empire published a book. It was the story of a poor nobleman, his brain addled from reading too many books of chivalry, who deludes himself that he is a knight errant and sets off on hilarious adventures. That book, Don Quixote, went on to sell more copies than any other book beside the Bible, making its author, Miguel de Cervantes, the single most-read author in human history. Cervantes did more than just publish a bestseller, though. He invented a way of writing.

In The Man Who Invented Fiction William Egginton explores Cervantes's life and the world he lived in, showing how his influences converged in his work, and how his work--especially Don Quixote--radically changed the nature of literature and created a new way of viewing the world.

  The opioid crisis has worried officials across the Northeast.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Representative Paul Tonko — a Democrat from the 20th district — tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock about a recent forum he hosted in Albany. 

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

The goal of the all-volunteer Reading Is Fun Program (RIF) in Schenectady, NY is to keep helping Schenectady's needy 4-9 year olds in pre-K, Kindergarten, and Grades 1-3, to learn reading-readiness and conversational skills and vocabulary.  

We are joined by Founder and Executive Director Alvin Magid and Chief Operating Officer Mary Lou Russo.

Over the past three years, American writer Ben Ehrenreich has been traveling to and living in the West Bank, staying with Palestinian families in its largest cities and its smallest villages. Eventually Ehrenreich moved to Ramallah, and started writing what would become his new book: The Way To The Spring: Life and Death in Palestine.

Ehrenreich was moved by the injustices that he witnessed, and by the general silence about them in most U.S. media. As well informed as he was on the Arab-Israeli conflict, he nonetheless was consistently shocked by what he saw, and by how little the vast majority of people in the U.S. (and even in Israel, just few miles away) understood about the lived realities of the occupation. He felt strongly that he wanted to write to break through those silences.

In cities and small villages alike, men and women, young and old, shared their lives with Ehrenreich and made their own case for resistance and resilience in the face of life under occupation. The Way to the Spring makes clear that conditions on the ground are changing--and getting worse.

6/27/16 Panel

Jun 27, 2016

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Brexit - Steven Leibo

Jun 24, 2016
Steven Leibo
Steven Leibo

  Dr. Steven A. Leibo, the Sherman David Spector Professor in the Humanities at the Sage Colleges in New York, specializes in Modern International History & Politics.

He joins us to discuss the Referendum of the United Kingdom's membership of the European Union – or Brexit. 

Brexit - Tina Packer

Jun 24, 2016

  One of our favorite Brits, Tina Packer - founding Artistic Director of Shakespeare & Company in Lenox, MA -  joins us to share her thoughts and feelings on the Referendum of the United Kingdom's membership of the European Union.

  Matthew Amroliwala is the host of Global with Matthew Amroliwala on BBC World News each weekday.

As BBC/US partners, WAMC reached out to their pressroom and Matthew agreed to join us today to talk about the Referendum of the United Kingdom's membership of the European Union – or Brexit. 

  Tim Vercellotti, political science professor and director of the Western New England University Polling Institute, is in London for a university summer program.

He has had a front row seat for the so-called “Brexit” referendum campaign.

Brexit - Hugh Johnson

Jun 24, 2016

  Nearly every market move over the last two weeks has been attributed to the British referendum on whether the United Kingdom should remain with or leave the European Union.

When a poll showed the British might want to leave? Stocks would go down. Then it looked like the U.K. would stay in the political and economic bloc and stocks would bounce up. Now that the U.K. has officially voted in favor of leaving, markets are going wild.

Investors around the world went into crisis mode as British voters chose to leave the European Union in a stunning decision with far-reaching implications. Hugh Johnson of Hugh Johnson Advisors in Albany, New York joins us live in Studio A to discuss the impact of the vote on the world and US economies.

6/24/16 Panel

Jun 24, 2016

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

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