The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, listener call-ins, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you have any questions or you'd like to be on the show, email us at roundtable@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

  Nearly seventy-five years ago, Donald Triplett of Forest, Mississippi, became the first child diagnosed with autism. Beginning with his family’s odyssey, In a Different Key tells the extraordinary story of this often misunderstood condition, and of the civil rights battles waged by the families of those who have it. Unfolding over decades, it is a beautifully rendered history of ordinary people determined to secure a place in the world for those with autism—by liberating children from dank institutions, campaigning for their right to go to school, challenging expert opinion on what it means to have autism, and persuading society to accept those who are different.  

We speak with John Donvan and Caren Zucker.

1/25/16 Panel

Jan 25, 2016

     The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

  Gregg Levoy's book, Vital Signs is about what inspires passion and what defeats it. How we lose it and how we get it back. It’s about the endless yet endlessly fruitful tug-of-war between freedom and domestication, the wild in us and the tame, our natural selves and our conditioned selves.

 The book also affirms the importance of courageous inquiry into dispassion—where we’re numb, depressed, stuck, bored—so the reader can recognize and change these tendencies in themselves.

    In this week's Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their discussion about Igor Stravinsky, hearing a selection from Les Noces.

  Of the ten million bits of information our brains process each second, only fifty bits are devoted to conscious thought. Because our brains are wired to be inattentive, we often choose without thinking, acting against our own interests—what we truly want.

 As the former Chief Scientist of Express Scripts, a Fortune 25 healthcare company dedicated to making the use of prescription medications safer and more affordable, Bob Nease is an expert on applying behavioral sciences to health care. Now, he applies his knowledge to the wider world, providing important practical solutions marketers, human resources professionals, teachers, and even parents can use to improve the behavior of others around them, and get the positive results they want.

His new book is The Power of Fifty Bits: The New Science of Turning Good Intentions into Positive Results.

  In just a few days, we’ll know if the presidential primary predictions were right.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti, director of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science, talks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock about the state of polling.

The X-Files is coming back Sunday.
FOX

One of America’s most beloved TV series is coming back for the first time since its original nine-season run came to a close in 2002. The X-Files is back for a six-episode miniseries starting Sunday night, returning David Duchovny’s Fox Mulder and Gillian Anderson’s Dana Scully to the world of the paranormal and conspiracy. The last time they played the characters in any form was in a 2008 movie.

  David McCallum is a Scottish-born actor and musician. He is best known for his television roles including Russian secret agent Ilya Kuryakin on The Man from U.N.C.L.E. and his current role as medical examiner Dr. Donald "Ducky" Mallard on NCIS.

Add "author" to his CV, his quirky crime novel, Once a Crooked Man is available now. In it, Sal, Max and Enzo Bruschetti have proved this over a lifetime of nefarious activity that they have kept hidden from law enforcement. Nowhere in any file, on any computer is there a record of anything illegal from which they have profited. But Max has a problem. His body is getting old and his doctor has told him to take it easy. Max has decided that the time has come for the family to retire.

1/22/16 Panel

Jan 22, 2016

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

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