The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

 WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9 a.m. to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge, Lin-Manuel Miranda and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org

Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

The Suitcase Junket
Jo Chattman

Clearwater's Great Hudson River Revival is taking place this coming weekend at Croton Point Park in Croton-on-Hudson, New York. This year’s festival will include performances by Nick Lowe, Arlo Guthrie, Los Lobos, Toshi Reagon & Big Lovely, Josh Ritter, Joan Osborne and many other great acts -- including our guest, The Suitcase Junket.

Western-Massachusetts based one-man-band Matt Lorenz creates music on restored, salvaged, and fully invented instruments created from old instruments and found objects. His latest album, Pile Driver, came out in April on Signature Sounds. 

Acclaimed pianist Simone Dinnerstein and the young, virtuosic Havana Lyceum Orchestra led by José Antonio Méndez Padrón will bring their remarkable cross-cultural Mozart in Havana tour to Skidmore’s Arthur Zankel Music Center on June 20 at 7 p.m., in a concert co-presented by Saratoga Performing Arts Center and Skidmore College. 

Simone Dinnerstein joins us to tell us more.

The Sembrich Museum, the former teaching studio of Metropolitan Opera prima donna Marcella Sembrich. Situated on a wooded peninsula in Lake George, the studio contains memorabilia of a distinguished international operatic career spanning more than 50 years.

Throughout the summer, The Sembrich presents a series of concerts, lectures, films and recitals featuring some of today's finest performing artists. The Sembrich’s Artistic Director Richard Wargo, joins us.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ testimony this week is still being digested by official Washington.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science, speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Quality is timeless. Just ask The Hot Sardines. In the talented hands of the New York-based ensemble, music first made famous decades ago comes alive through their brassy horn arrangements, rollicking piano melodies, and vocals from a chanteuse who transports listeners to a different era with the mere lilt of her voice.

The Hot Sardines are performing in Ozawa Hall at Tanglewood on Friday, June 16. Evan Palazzo joins us -- he's a stride pianist and bandleader for The Hot Sardines, and was a busboy at Tanglewood when he was a kid!

6/15/17 Panel

Jun 15, 2017

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today we are live at The Linda with an audience of WAMC members.

Today’s panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois, Publisher Emeritus of The Daily Freeman Ira Fusfeld and -- our special guest -- counter-terrorism expert, best-selling author, and MSNBC commentator Malcolm Nance.

Ellen Hopkins is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of eleven young adult novels, as well as the adult novels TrianglesCollateral, and Love Lies Beneath.

Her latest is The You I've Never Known.

Richard Rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, is here to tell us about his new book: The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America which explores how the laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governments actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day.

Richard Rothstein is a research associate of the Economic Policy Institute and a Fellow at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. He is a Fellow of the Haas Institute at the University of California Berkeley. 

Republicans’ policy agenda has stalled amid a raft of White House scandals.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Congressional Quarterly’s David Hawkings wraps up his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

The prospect of entering treatment is overwhelming for anyone facing a diagnosis of cancer. While patients have access to a vast amount of medical information online, this advice is often unreliable or confusing. In their new book, Living with Cancer, Drs. Vicki Jackson and David Ryan have crafted a step-by-step guide aimed at helping people grasp what’s happening to them while coping physically and emotionally with cancer treatment. 

The book is designed to be a resource full of patient stories, teaching patients and caregivers how to ask the right questions to get the best possible care - beginning at the moment of diagnosis. They also explain how to work with a team of doctors and nurse practitioners to minimize symptoms and side effects while living as fully as possible in the face of cancer.

6/14/17 Panel

Jun 14, 2017

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today’s panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois, and Associate Editor of the Times Union, Mike Spain.

Michael Cannell is the author of The Limit: Life and Death on the 1961 Grand Prix Circuit and I.M. Pei: Mandarin of Modernism. He was editor of the New York Times House & Home section for seven years and has written for The New YorkerThe New York Times MagazineSports Illustrated, and many other publications.

His new book is Incendiary: The Psychiatrist, the Mad Bomber, and the Invention of Criminal Profiling.

Grand Central, Penn Station, Radio City Music Hall ― for almost two decades, no place was safe from the man who signed his anonymous letters “FP” and left his lethal devices in phone booths, storage lockers, even tucked into the plush seats of movie theaters. His victims were left cruelly maimed. Tabloids called him “the greatest individual menace New York City ever faced.”

Journalist and cultural critic Kate Bolick is back with another season of Touchstones: Conversations at The Mount in Lenox, MA. On Thursday afternoon, Kate will be having an intimate conversation with author Lee Siegel about his memoir, The Draw.

The book tells the story of the unforgiving sovereignty of money. Hoping to make a killing in New Jersey real estate, Lee’s dad Monroe Siegel, takes a draw from his employer against unearned commission. When the recession hits in the 1970s, Monroe finds himself owing a small fortune to his firm.

He sinks toward divorce and bankruptcy, while Lola, Lee's mother, suffers a nervous breakdown that turns her into a different person. Shamed and enraged by his father's fate, Lee grows up wondering what society owes a person who has failed materially but preserved his humanity.

  Today's Book Picks list comes from Sarah Knight of The Northshire Bookstore.

List:
Camino Beach by John Grisham
Murder in Saint Germain by Cara Black
Celine by Peter Heller
The Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz
The Silent Corner by Dean Koontz
Shiver Hitch by Linda Greenlaw

Debate over health care policy has intensified for at least 25 years in Washington.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Congressional Quarterly’s David Hawkings continues his conversation with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

This summer, The Adirondack Theatre Festival’s presents an entire season of major new works. 

After a record-breaking season of sold-out performances last year, nearly doubling attendance and subscribership in just the past two years, the 2017 season promises to be even larger.  Performances will run June 21 – August 12 at the Charles R. Wood Theater in Downtown Glens Falls, NY.

The Adirondack Theatre Festival 23rd season – the third for Producing Artistic Director, Chad Rabinovitz – includes Nikola Tesla Drops the Beat, Knights of the Sales Office, The Boy in the Bathroom, and Glitches in Reality – along with special events and readings.  

6/13/17 Panel

Jun 13, 2017

      The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of The Times Union Mike Spain, and Publisher of Empire Report J.P. Miller.

  Prescription drug use in America has increased tenfold in the past 50 years, and over-the-counter drug use has risen just as dramatically. 

 In addition to the dozens of medications we take to treat serious illnesses, we take drugs to help us sleep, to keep us awake, to keep our noses from running, our backs from aching, and our minds from racing. Name a symptom, there's a pill to suppress it. In Mind over Meds, bestselling author Dr. Andrew Weil alerts readers to the problem of overmedication.

Spencertown Academy Arts Center’s 13th annual Hidden Gardens Tour, the annual gateway to summer in Columbia County, happens this Saturday, June 17th. It includes an array of events designed to inform, inspire, and intrigue garden enthusiasts. The theme of this year’s Hidden Gardens Tour is “Artful Landscapes.”

Highlights of the event include Columbia County private gardens tour and cocktail party; a Garden Market on The Green; a lecture on vegetable gardening and the “Art from Farm to Table” art exhibition.

To tell us more, we welcome Madaline Sparks and Vivian Wachsberger, the co-chairs of Hidden Gardens, and Norma Cohen, the curator of the “Art from Farm to Table” art exhibition.

The Williamstown Theatre Festival’s 2017 Season, the 63rd Season for the Tony Award-winning theatre company gets underway June 27th - including four world premieres, a new musical, the first production of a WTF commissioned artist, and much more.

The season, running through August 20, 2017, begins on the Main Stage with a production of a new play by Jen Silverman, The Roommate, featuring Golden Globe and Emmy Award nominee Jane Kaczmarek; continues with Sarah Ruhl’s 2005 Pulitzer Prize finalist comedy The Clean House starring Tony Award nominee Jessica Hecht; and closes with a new musical - A Legendary Romance.

The Nikos Stage season kicks off June 28 with the world premiere of Jason Kim’s play The Model American and also includes the world premiere of Where Storms Are by Harrison David Rivers; the world premiere play Moscow Moscow Moscow Moscow Moscow Moscow directed by Obie Award winner and Drama Desk nominee Trip Cullman; and closes out the summer with Actually, a co-world premiere with Geffen Playhouse.

Before coming to Williamstown, Mandy Greenfield was the artistic producer of Manhattan Theatre Club and now this is her third season at WTF.

Fired FBI Director James Comey’s testimony was an extraordinary day in American politics.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Congressional Quarterly’s David Hawkings speaks with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

As humans, we all need to belong. While modern social life can make even the best of us feel gawky, for roughly one in five of us, navigating its challenges is consistently overwhelming -- an ongoing maze without an exit. Often unable to grasp social cues or master the skills and grace necessary for smooth interaction, we feel out of sync with those around us. Though individuals may recognize their awkward disposition, they rarely understand why they are like this -- which makes it hard for them to know how to adjust their behavior.

Psychologist and interpersonal relationship expert Ty Tashiro knows what it’s like to be awkward. His new book is Awkward: The Science of Why We're Socially Awkward and Why That's Awesome.

6/12/17 Panel

Jun 12, 2017

    The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, political consultant and lobbyist, Libby Post, and Communications Consultant Theresa Bourgeois. 

A scene from Hell on Earth.
Junger/Quested

In his journalism, books and films, Sebastian Junger is often attracted to extremes — as in projects like The Perfect Storm, Tribe, and the Oscar-nominated Restrepo. His haunting new documentary with Nick Quested is called Hell on Earth: The Fall of Syria and the Rise of ISIS. The movie shows the human stakes of a civil war that has killed 400,000 people and displaced even more. It also explores the complicated political picture that has led to few good options in this volatile region. Hell on Earth airs Sunday on National Geographic Channel.

Until the late 1960s, tens of thousands of American children suffered crippling birth defects if their mothers had been exposed to rubella, popularly known as German measles, while pregnant; there was no vaccine and little understanding of how the disease devastated fetuses. In June 1962, a young biologist in Philadelphia, using tissue extracted from an aborted fetus from Sweden, produced safe, clean cells that allowed the creation of vaccines against rubella and other common childhood diseases. Two years later, in the midst of a devastating German measles epidemic, his colleague developed the vaccine that would one day wipe out homegrown rubella. The rubella vaccine and others made with those fetal cells have protected more than 150 million people in the United States, the vast majority of them preschoolers. 

Meredith Wadman covered biomedical research politics from Washington for twenty years. She is a reporter at  Science and has written for NatureFortune, the New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal. A graduate of Stanford and Columbia, she began medical school at the University of British Columbia and completed her medical degree as a Rhodes scholar at the University of Oxford.

Her new book is The Vaccine Race: Science, Politics, and the Human Costs of Defeating Disease

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