The Roundtable

Weekdays, 9 a.m.

Credit Peter Steiner

  WAMC's The Roundtable is an award-winning, nationally recognized eclectic talk program. The show airs from 9am to noon each weekday and features news, interviews, in-depth discussion, music, and much (much) more! Hosted by Joe Donahue and produced by Sarah LaDuke, The Roundtable tackles serious and lighthearted subjects, looking to explore the many facets of the human condition with civility, respect and responsibility.

The show's hallmark is thoughtful interviews with A-list newsmakers, authors, artists, sports figures, actors, and people with interesting stories to tell. Since hitting the airwaves in May of 2001, The Roundtable has interviewed the likes of Arthur Miller, Kurt Vonnegut, Maya Angelou, Madeleine Albright, Jimmy Carter, John McCain, Bob Dole, Bill O'Reilly, Steve Martin, James Taylor, Stephen King, Melissa Etheridge and lots of other really cool people. Plus, Wilco does our theme song. What more can you ask for?

If you would like to be on the show email us at roundtable@wamc.org

Send your comments or questions for The Roundtable Panel to panel@wamc.org

10:25 - The Writer's Almanac
11:10 - Earth Wise
Book Picks lists are here.
You may also hear Pulse of the Planet and Sound Beat on The Roundtable.

It’s a time of change in Washington.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Congressional Quarterly’s David Hawkings tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock what the Trump White House could mean for D.C.

The Pan American Exposition in Buffalo, New York, meant to herald the twentieth century, went tragically, spectacularly awry.

The Exposition opened with fanfare; its wonders, both strange and magnificent, dazzled the public. Then tragedy struck. In the early autumn of 1901, an assassin stalked the fairgrounds, waiting for President William McKinley. That was shocking enough, but there were more surprises in store.

In The Electrifying Fall of Rainbow City: Spectacle and Assassination at the 1901 World's Fair, Margaret S. Creighton lifts the curtain on the assassination of McKinley as well as on the fair’s lesser-known battles, involving both notorious and forgotten figures.

11/18/16 Panel

Nov 18, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao, and author and activist Barbara Smith. 

 

Opalka Gallery PechaKucha Night - Friday, November 18, 6:30 pm snacks, 7 pm talks - Short talks by interesting people. PechaKucha is a format in which speakers present 20 slides for 20 seconds each. Rosemary Armao will speak tonight.

Today the Borscht Belt is recalled through the nostalgic lens of summer swims, Saturday night dances, and comedy performances. But its current state, like that of many other formerly glorious regions, is nothing like its earlier status. Forgotten about and exhausted, much of its structural environment has been left to decay.

The new book, The Borscht Belt: Revisiting the Remains of America's Jewish Vacationland, presents Marisa Scheinfeld's photographs of abandoned sites where resorts, hotels, and bungalow colonies once boomed in the Catskill Mountain region of upstate New York.

The Borscht Belt presents a contemporary view of more than forty hotel and bungalow sites. From entire expanses of abandoned properties to small lots containing drained swimming pools, the remains of the Borscht Belt era now lie forgotten, overgrown, and vacant.

Scheinfeld has two book events in Albany this week -- one at the Colonie Library tonight sponsored by SUNY Albany Judaic Studies and another on Friday evening as part of a special presentation for the NYS History Conference at the NYS museum from 6:30 – 8:30 PM. 

Best-selling author Steven Johnson joins us to make the case that play is a profound driver of future invention.

His new book Wonderland: How Play Made the Modern World explores how pursuits born from wonder and delight have led to essential breakthroughs in computing, communication and connecting the world.

The election will have major impacts on the future of the Supreme Court.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock what might happen next.

Shawn Stone, Digital Editor of The Alt joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

11/17/16 Panel

Nov 17, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao and Poughkeepsie Journal Executive Editor Stu Shinske.

Peter Himmelman is an award-winning musician turned communications expert and the founder of Big Muse.

His new book is Let Me Out: Unlock Your Creative Mind and Bring Your Ideas to Life. In it he uses science-based techniques and simple exercises to get unstuck and unlock your creative potential.

Alton Brown is the author of the James Beard award winning, I’m Just Here for the Food, and the New York Times bestselling sequence, Good Eats, and host of TV’s Cutthroat Kitchen, Camp Cutthroat, Iron Chef America and Good Eats on Food Network.

His new live show Eat Your Science is a follow-up to the smash Edible Inevitable tour. Brown is adding a slew of fresh ingredients including new puppets, songs and bigger and potentially more dangerous experiments.

The show will be at UPAC in Kingston, NY on Thursday, November 17 at 8:00 pm before it plays Broadway's Barrymore Theatre November 22-27.

Since his first recordings in 1955, Johnny Cash has been an icon in the music world. Now comes a collection of his as-yet-unpublished poems adding to his already prolific number of original songs: Forever Words: The Unknown Poems.

In these words, we see the world through Cash’s eyes, his reflection upon his own interior reality, frailties and strengths alike. The poetry reveals his depth of understanding; both of the world around him and within. Coming from purely American and gospel traditions of song writing, Cash reflects upon love, pain, freedom, and mortality.

John Carter Cash, who has been involved in music all his life, is an accomplished and award-winning record producer as well as a singer-songwriter and recording artist. The only son to Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash, he is the author of three children’s books, and a biography of his father, one of his mother, and a fantasy novel, Lupus Rex

Hillary Clinton won the popular vote, but not the presidency.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock why the Electoral College is probably here to stay.

In a career that has spanned over sixty years, Robert Wagner has witnessed the twilight of the Golden Age of Hollywood and the rise of television, becoming a beloved star in both film and TV. During this time, he became acquainted, both professionally and socially, with many of the greatest female screen personalities of all time.

His new book, I Loved Her in the Movies: Memories of Hollywood’s Legendary Actresses, gives us an account of the charisma of these women on film.  Among Wagner's subjects are Joan Crawford, Bette Davis, Marilyn Monroe, Gloria Swanson, Loretta Young, Raquel Welch, Glenn Close, and the two actresses whom he ultimately married, Natalie Wood and Jill St. John.

Robert Wagner is the star of such films as A Kiss Before DyingThe Longest DayThe Pink Panther, and most recently, the Austin Powers franchise. On television, he starred in It Takes a Thief (with Fred Astaire), Switch (with Eddie Albert and Sharon Gless), and Hart to Hart (with Stefanie Powers). 

11/16/16 Panel

Nov 16, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany, Rosemary Armao and Times Union Columnist Chris Churchill.

James Lasdun At NYSWI

Nov 15, 2016

It is summer, 2012. Charlie, a wealthy banker with an uneasy conscience, invites his troubled cousin Matthew to visit him and his wife in their idyllic mountaintop house. As the days grow hotter, the friendship between the three begins to reveal its fault lines, and with the arrival of a fourth character, the household finds itself suddenly in the grip of uncontrollable passions. As readers of James Lasdun’s acclaimed fiction can expect, The Fall Guy is a complex moral tale as well as a gripping suspense story, probing questions of guilt and betrayal with ruthless incisiveness.

James Lasdun and Charles Baxter will participate in two events presented by The New York State Writers Institute today.

The Berkshire Concert Choir was formed in 1977 with the merger of the Stockbridge Singers, Inc. and The Cantata Choir of South Congregational Church of Pittsfield. The Choir is a membership organization open to all who enjoy singing and are willing to devote one evening a week to rehearsals.

The Choir presents Carl Orff's cantata, Carmina Burana, on Saturday, November 19 at 7:30 pm in the Boland Theater at Berkshire Community College, 1350 West Street, Pittsfield. 

To tell us more, we welcome Paula Nuss, Artistic Director, Marilyn Gerhard, tenor and President of the choir, and Francis Stone, bass and board member.

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to discuss social media in the news and as the news.  

Jesse Feiler helps people and organizations get to know and use new technologies. Projects have included building the page caching module for the Prodigy Web Browser for Mac in the very early days of the Web, location-based apps for iPhone and iOS, as well as books and classes on new technologies. Forthcoming books include “iPad For Seniors for Dummies" (9th edition) and “Learn Apple HomeKit on the Mac and iOS.”

Current projects involve using apps and FileMaker databases for identifying and managing risk in nonprofit organizations as well as helping small communities build location-based apps to promote tourism, downtown economic development, and the wise use of natural resources. 

   This week's Book Picks come to us from Joan Grenier at The Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley, MA.

List:
Words in Transit: Stories of Immigrants edited by Ilan Stavans
Shakespeare and Company: A History of the Rag & Bone Shop of the Heart edited by Krista Halverson
Footnotes from the World’s Greatest Bookstores by Bob Eckstein, Foreword by Garrison Keillor
Dancers after Dark by Jordan Matter
Palestine on a Plate: Memories from My Mother’s Kitchen by Joudie Kalla
Truevine: Two Brothers, a Kidnapping, and a Mother’s Quest: A True Story of the Jim Crow South by Beth Macy
Our Revolution by Bernie Sanders

It was one of the most surprising election outcomes in modern political history.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock how Donald Trump won the White House.

11/15/16 Panel

Nov 15, 2016

The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Times Union Associate Editor Mike Spain and Corporate Attorney Rich Honen.

From the fictional towns of Hill Valley, CA, and Shermer, IL, to the beautiful landscapes of the “Goondocks” in Astoria and the “time of your life” dirty dancing resort still alive and well in Lake Lure, NC, '80s teen movies left their mark not just on movie screen and in the hearts of fans, but on the landscape of America itself.

Like few other eras in movie history, the '80s teen movies has endured and gotten better with time. In Brat Pack America, Kevin Smokler gives virtual tours of your favorite movies while also picking apart why these locations are so important to these movies.

After traveling across three continents to stalk the modern story of butter, award-winning food writer and former pastry chef Elaine Khosrova tells a story as rich, textured, and culturally relevant as butter itself. Her new book is Butter: A Rich History.

From its humble agrarian origins to its present-day artisanal glory, butter has a fascinating story to tell, and Khosrova is the perfect person to tell it. With tales about the ancient butter bogs of Ireland, the pleasure dairies of France, and the sacred butter sculptures of Tibet, Khosrova details butter’s role in history, politics, economics, nutrition, and even spirituality and art.

Ray Kroc was peddling franchises around the country for a fledgling hamburger stand in the 1950s - McDonald’s, it was called - when he entered a St. Paul supper club and encountered a beautiful young piano player named Joan who would change his life forever.

Just as their relationship twisted and turned dramatically, the fortunes of Ray’s new business came perilously close to failure.  Ultimately Ray wrested control of McDonald’s from the original founders; in short order the successful burger stand in the desert of California would be transformed into a stock market sensation and international brand.

To the outside world, Ray and Joan were happy, enormously rich, and giving. But privately, Joan was growing troubled over Ray’s temper and dark secret, something she was reluctant to publicly reveal. And yet, this volatility paved the way for Joan’s transformation into one of the greatest philanthropists of our time.

Journalist Lisa Napoli’s new book is: Ray & Joan: The Man Who Made the McDonald's Fortune and the Woman Who Gave It All Away. 

What does Donald Trump’s election mean for the Supreme Court?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science concludes his discussion with WAMC’s Alan Chartock.

Our Falling into Place series spotlights the important work of -and fosters collaboration between- not-for-profit organizations in our communities; allowing us all to fall into place.

Falling Into Place is supported by The Seymour Fox Memorial Foundation, Providing a helping hand to turn inspiration into accomplishment. See more possibilities … see more promise… see more progress.

Today we will learn about Troy Area United Ministries which has various programs to serve those in need, including a Furniture Program, Troy Damien Center, MLK Scholarships, and Computers for Kids.

Rev. Donna Elia, Executive Director of Troy Area United Ministries joins us. 

If you, or someone you know has furniture available to donate, please call at 274.5920 x204.

11/14/16 Panel

Nov 14, 2016

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Director of the Journalism Program at the University at Albany Rosemary Armao and Communications Specialist Theresa Bourgeois.

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