Weekend Edition on WAMC HD2

Saturdays and Sundays, 7 a.m. - 11p.m.

Weekend Edition Saturday, hosted by Scott Simon, has a unique and entertaining roster of other regular contributors. Marin Alsop, conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, talks about music. Daniel Pinkwater, one of the biggest names in children's literature, talks about and reads stories with Simon. Financial journalist Joe Nocera follows the economy. Howard Bryant of EPSN.com and NPR's Tom Goldman chime in on sports. Keith Devlin, of Stanford University, unravels the mystery of math, and Will Grozier, a London cabbie, talks about good books that have just been released, and what well-read people leave in the back of his taxi. Simon contributes his own award-winning essays, which are sometimes humorous, sometimes poignant.

Weekend Edition Sunday is hosted by Rachel Martin.Every week listeners tune in to hear a unique blend of news, features and the regularly scheduled puzzle segment with Puzzlemaster Will Shortz, the crossword puzzle editor of The New York Times.

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Sports
7:52 am
Sat October 25, 2014

Royals Take Game 3; Cowboys Surge: The Week In Sports

Originally published on Sat October 25, 2014 11:57 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Now why don't we turn to sports?

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Music Interviews
7:52 am
Sat October 25, 2014

Oratorio Tackles The Issue Of Leaks From 'The Source'

Originally published on Sat October 25, 2014 11:57 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Author Interviews
11:34 am
Sat October 18, 2014

424 Steps To Happiness: A Father's Journey Beyond 'The Fall'

Originally published on Sat October 18, 2014 3:46 pm

Tito is a delightful young man. The world would call him disabled; he's had cerebral palsy since birth, the result of a bungled medical procedure at a hospital in Venice.

Tito was born to Anna and Diogo Mainardi, who is one of Brazil's best-known columnists as well as a novelist and screenwriter.

Tito is dauntless and spirited. He can walk 424 steps before he falls — but he always falls.

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Simon Says
8:42 am
Sat October 18, 2014

A Candidate With Low Poll Numbers, But High Hopes

Originally published on Sat October 18, 2014 3:46 pm

Dr. Doug Butzier died on duty this week. He was 59 and crashed in his own small plane flying home to Dubuque, Iowa.

Doug Butzier was a former paramedic who put himself through medical school and became chief of the emergency room and medical staff at Mercy Medical Center and the Dubuque Fire Department. An EMS supervisor named Wayne Dow told the Dubuque Telegraph Herald, "We adored him ... He appreciated what we did, and he never forgot where he came from."

Dr. Butzier leaves behind his wife, two sons, and three step-children.

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Asia
7:46 am
Sat October 18, 2014

Chinese Find Number URLs Easier Than Letters

Originally published on Sat October 18, 2014 3:46 pm

Chinese characters don't readily work with the English-centric internet. The New Republic's Chris Beam tells NPR's Scott Simon that the Chinese use numbers that when pronounced, sound like words. This story air originally on Weekend Edition Saturday on May 10, 2014.

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Sports
7:46 am
Sat October 18, 2014

Two Wildcard Teams Meet In World Series

Originally published on Sat October 18, 2014 3:46 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

BJ Leiderman writes our theme music. Want to hear it?

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Economy
7:46 am
Sat October 18, 2014

Pritzker Travels Europe And Asia On Commercial Diplomacy Tour

Originally published on Sat October 18, 2014 3:46 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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NPR Story
2:20 pm
Sat October 11, 2014

North Korean Leader, Out Of Sight For Weeks

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Politics
11:46 am
Sat October 11, 2014

A Republican Battles To Keep His Job In Deep-Red Kansas

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on immigration reform in Washington, D.C., in April. Kobach's challenger, Democrat Jean Schodorf, promises to stay closer to Kansas.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Sat October 11, 2014 2:20 pm

If you saw Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach meeting with half a dozen supporters in an Kansas bar recently, you might think that he hadn't come all that far from his childhood in Topeka, where his dad owned a Buick dealership.

But this smiling, enthusiastic guy holds degrees from Harvard, Oxford and Yale, and he's a national stalwart of the anti-immigration movement.

"I have been involved in restoring the rule of law in immigration," he says. "That means trying to stop the lawlessness in the Obama administration, and that also means defending states like Arizona."

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Environment
9:59 am
Sat October 11, 2014

Millennials: We Help The Earth But Don't Call Us Environmentalists

Millennials seem to prioritize the environment, but may want to dissociate from the "treehugger" baggage of the term "environmentalist."
Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 8:10 pm

This story is part of the New Boom series on millennials in America.

Young people have been the life blood of the environmental movement for decades. There could be trouble on the horizon though, and it all comes down to semantics.

To explain, it's helpful to use the example of Lisa Curtis, a 26-year-old from Oakland, California.

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