1980s

When Jonathan Cain and the iconic band Journey were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Cain could say he had finally arrived. But Cain's journey wasn't always easy and his true arrival in life had more to do with faith than fame.

His new memoir is "Don't Stop Believin': The Man, the Band, and the Song that Inspired Generations."

Journey's 58-city North American tour with Def Leppard will be in Albany at The Times Union Center on Wednesday, May 23.

South Jersey, circa 1983: A distinctive sub-region, as if a section of the south or Midwest was grafted onto the east coast. Francis, a defrocked college student who has made a mess of both his scholastic career and his life, finds himself back home at the Jersey shore and gainfully employed at a sprawling, subterranean gas station.

“Petroleum Transfer Engineer” is not just Francis’s story, but is also the chronicle of a time and place that is slowly disappearing: The farmland, little eateries, and raucous bars giving way to development; the resorts of Atlantic City morphing into its soulless casino incarnation. Francis must navigate a terrain that is simultaneously familiar and off-kilter. Somehow, he must struggle to piece his life back together.

Richard Klin lives in New York’s Hudson Valley. He is the author of “Something to Say: Thoughts on Art and Politics in America and Abstract Expressionism For Beginners.” He will be at the Golden Notebook in Woodstock, New York for a reading and signing on Saturday afternoon at 4 p.m.

Adam Gopnik’s new memoir, At the Strangers’ Gate: Arrivals in New York, is a memoir that captures the romance of New York City in the 1980’s.

The book is essentially a prequel to Adam’s bestseller, Paris to the Moon, and documents his early adventures in the 1980’s in NYC with his wife. 

John Oates was born at the perfect time, paralleling the birth of rock ‘n roll. Raised in a small Pennsylvania town, he was exposed to folk, blues, soul, and R&B. Meeting and teaming up with Daryl Hall in the late 1960s, they developed a style of music that was uniquely their own but never abandoned their roots.

In Change of Seasons: A Memoir, John uncovers the grit and struggle it took to secure a recording contract with the legendary Atlantic Records and chronicles the artistic twists and turns that resulted in a DJ discovering an obscure album track that would become their first hit record.

From the fictional towns of Hill Valley, CA, and Shermer, IL, to the beautiful landscapes of the “Goondocks” in Astoria and the “time of your life” dirty dancing resort still alive and well in Lake Lure, NC, '80s teen movies left their mark not just on movie screen and in the hearts of fans, but on the landscape of America itself.

Like few other eras in movie history, the '80s teen movies has endured and gotten better with time. In Brat Pack America, Kevin Smokler gives virtual tours of your favorite movies while also picking apart why these locations are so important to these movies.

  Novelist Liz Moore’s latest is The Unseen World , which tells the moving story of a daughter’s quest to discover the truth about her beloved father’s hidden past.

The story begins in a computer science lab in 1980s-era Boston and follows the girl’s quest to figure out her father’s secrets in a virtual universe. 


  Michael Mayer is the Tony-Award winning director of plays, musicals, opera, and film and television who helmed the Broadway revival of Hedwig and The Angry Inch, and the original runs of the musicals of Everyday Rapture, American Idiot, Spring Awakening, and Thoroughly Modern Millie. He’s also directed revivals of A View From the Bridge, The Lion in Winter, After the Fall, and ‘night Mother. His breakthrough of sorts was Side Man.

 

Side Man had an early production in Poughkeepsie, NY at Vassar College and New York Stage and Film’s Powerhouse Theater -- it moved to off-Off-Broadway and then to Broadway winning the Tony Award for Best Play in 1999.

 

Michael Mayer has been coming back to Poughkeepsie in the summer for 20 years, working on shows in various stages of development and recently joining the New York Stage and Film board of directors.

He was in the Hudson Valley this summer working on a new musical entitled Head Over Heels which blends Sir Philip Sidney’s The Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia with the music of seminal 80s girl-group, The Go-Go’s. Jeff Whitty is writing the book and Tom Kitt will provide musical supervision.

Delta Lady: A Memoir

May 12, 2016

  She inspired songs—Leon Russell wrote “A Song for You” and “Delta Lady” for her, Stephen Stills wrote “Cherokee.” She co-wrote songs—“Superstar” and the piano coda to “Layla,” uncredited. She sang backup for Eric Clapton, Joe Cocker, and Stills, before finding fame as a solo artist with such hits as “We're All Alone” and “(Your Love Has Lifted Me) Higher and Higher.”

Following her story from Lafayette, Tennessee to becoming one of the most sought after rock vocalists in LA in the 1970s, Delta Lady chronicles Rita Coolidge’s fascinating journey throughout the ’60s-’70s pop/rock universe.

  As a performer, songwriter and producer, Richard Marx’s nearly three-decade-long career has had innumerable highlights. The Chicago native has sold more than 30 million albums worldwide. To this day, he is the only male artist in history to have his first seven singles reach the Top 5 on the Billboard charts.

He will perform at The Colonial in Pittsfield, MA this Friday, presented by The Berkshire Theatre Group.

    The Breakfast Club defined an entire generation of pop culture and included such talent as Molly Ringwald “the princess,” Anthony Michael Hall “the brain,” Emilio Estevez “the jock,” Judd Nelson “the criminal,” and Ally Sheedy “the basket-case.”

It is likely the late John Hughes most-loved film and it's receiving a cinema re-release from Fathom Events tomorrow night and next Tuesday, March 31st. To commemorate the anniversary, we spoke with Kirk Honeycutt about his book, John Hughes: A Life in Film.  

Honeycutt is the former chief film critic for The Hollywood Reporter for many years and subsequent to that, senior film reporter for that publication. Honeycutt is a member of the prestigious Los Angeles Film Critics Association, and is the creator of Honeycutt's Hollywood, a popular film review website.

  Robert Goolrick’s most recent novel, The Fall of Princes, is set in 1980’s New York City, a time when Wall Street ruled, drugs were in constant supply, and jockeying for power was the name of the game. We meet Rooney, who tells the story of how he and a group of other young Princes made it to the top and then, one by one, took a fall.