abolitionists

The Charlemont Forum in Charlemont Massachusetts is an ongoing lecture series that explores the causes of and possible solutions for one aspect of the current divisions in American political culture. 

On Wednesday, July 5th at 7 p.m., The Charlemont Forum is hosting a community reading of Frederick Douglass' famous speech, "What to the Slave is the 4th of July."

The co-artistic directors of the Double Edge Theater of Ashfield, are partnering with the Charlemont Forum to choreograph an engaging event. Actors from the Double Edge Theater together with approximately nine other readers who have volunteered from the hill towns, will give a dramatic reading of this stirring speech, which dates back to 5 July, 1852. 

We are joined now by Bruce Lessels - a Charlemont Forum Board member and a Board member for the Double Edge Theater Company in Ashfield, Massachusetts.

Throughout its history America has been torn in two by debates over ideals and beliefs. In The Book That Changed America​, Randall Fuller takes us back to one of those turning points, in 1860, with the story of the influence of Charles Darwin’s just-published On the Origin of Species on five American intellectuals, including Bronson Alcott, Henry David Thoreau, the child welfare reformer Charles Loring Brace, and the abolitionist Franklin Sanborn.  

Each of these figures seized on the book’s assertion of a common ancestry for all creatures as a powerful argument against slavery, one that helped provide scientific credibility to the cause of abolition.

    In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we learn about Reading Frederick Douglass, a statewide initiative led by Mass Humanities. Communities and organizations around the state typically organize public readings of Douglass' speech, "What is the Meaning of the Fourth of July to the Negro." We are joined today by Manisha Sinha, Professor of Afro-American Studies at University of Massachusetts-Amherst and Rose Sackey-Milligan, Program Officer at Mass Humanities. With them we explore the value of the humanities in enhancing and improving civic life.

  

  The Northeastern United States—home to abolitionism and a refuge for blacks fleeing the Jim Crow South—has had a long and celebrated history of racial equality and political liberalism. After World War II, the region appeared poised to continue this legacy, electing black politicians and rallying behind black athletes and cultural leaders. However, as historian Jason Sokol reveals in All Eyes Are Upon Us, these achievements obscured the harsh reality of a region driven by segregation and deep-seated racism.

All month we've been learning about the NEH film series, Created Equal. One of those films, The Abolitionists tells the story of the struggle to end slavery. This week, we'll learn how this struggle played out locally and why it still matters today.

Mary Liz Stewart is the Executive Director of the Underground Railroad History Project of the Capital Region and she joins us to tell us more.