Academic Minute

Over the years we’ve heard about the importance of reading to our children from a very young age. Now, there’s research to show that just talking to children from the moment of birth can help their brains develop…and the number of words is extremely important.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll learn about the 30 Million Words Initiative, and how poverty may be affecting the way some parents speak to their children.

More schools around the country are emphasizing STEM education to help students get a head start in a world that is rapidly becoming more technology driven. But with all that science and math…is there any room for creativity?

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk about a group where imagination is the key to the destination.

Then we’ll hear about some nursing students who are helping new refugees in the US navigate the health care system…and we’ll also spend an academic minute with Baby Boomers who are having a little too much fun.

Space is hot. Yes, I do in fact know that outer space is icy cold… but here on planet earth, shows about the planets and exploration of the universe are turning some astrophysicists into rock stars. Well now there’s one who would rather be a star in interpretive dance. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk to an astrophysicist who is putting together a multimedia presentation that’s out of this world.

Then we’ll hear about a unique program in Massachusetts that is helping high school students get a good start to the day.

University of West Florida

American needs more nurses…it’s one of the most in demand professions in the US today and it doesn’t look like the demand is going to go down anytime soon. So how much education do today’s nurses need…and has that changed over the past decade or so. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk to the Dean of the College of Health at a Florida university and find out her diagnosis on the state of nursing education.

We’ll also spend an academic minute staying healthy by keeping a nice house.

WUWF Radio

Bob  was kind of tempted to start today’s program with a rhyme, but decided he's not that talented or hokey. Poetry, the real stuff not anything he could come up with, is everywhere…if you know where to look.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll meet Jeff Newberry, an English Professor and Poet in Residence at an agricultural college in Georgia who is also a published poet that turned his love of his home along the Gulf Coast into verse.

C2 Education

Beginning March 5th, students around the country will sit and take the S.A.T….and it will be very different. In what some are calling the biggest overhaul to the exam in a century, it will look different, be scored differently and, hopefully, better measure a student’s chance for success in college.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk to a national leader in SAT preparation about the new exam.

National Alliance for Public Charter Schools

This is the 25th year that charter schools have been operating in the US, and new report says that, enrollment wise, they are doing better than ever. Hundreds of new charter schools have opened this year. However, a couple hundred have closed. And the head of a national charter school group says that’s fine with them.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll catch up with the charter school movement.

Facebook

Reaction has been coming in from all sides on President Obama’s State of the Union Address. The reaction from Republican presidential candidates was as negative as you’d expect. The other side of the aisle was more positive. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, a conversation with, Randi Weingarten, President of the American Federation of Teachers.

The White House
The White House

He shall from time to time give to Congress information of the State of the Union and recommend to their Consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient. That’s the line from Article II, Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution that has morphed into the president’s annual state of the union address. And most years, that address has a section devoted to education. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll review President Obama’s final state of the union.

Equator Network

It takes a long to time research and report findings in a scientific journal.

So after all that work, you’d like of think those scientists would be good at actually writing the reports. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll hear about STARD, a statement of standards for scientific reporting. And how they’re being updated.

We’ll also hear about the lights being used to study Lake Champlain, learn about efforts to save a dying language in the Northwest and spend an academic minute exploring your inner feelings about the United Nations.

Bob Barrett

Whether it’s done with pen and paper, computer, tablet, even stone and chisel, writing has been and will continue to be one of the signature means of communication. Teaching writing is as important as ever…as is getting teachers the tools and training to be effective writing mentors to students.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk about the National Writing Project, and how it’s expanding into an area of the country that really needs it.

And another one bites the dust. Before we kick 2015 to the curb for good, let’s listen back to conversations with some really interesting people we had this year. Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, we’ll listen again to Pat Bradley’s interview with Alan Alda when he came to Vermont to open an institute for scientific communication.

UWF Historic trust

Quick, what’s the oldest city in the continental United States? If you said St. Augustine…bingo; you’re mostly right. That small city on Florida’s east coast is the oldest continuously occupied European-established community in the states. But the people who built that settlement weren’t the first to try to put down roots in what would become the Sunshine State.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, a look at how Florida is trying to preserve its history.

Do you remember the movie "Mean Girls"? The screenplay to the 2004 film was written by Saturday Night Live and 30 Rock star Tina Fey, who also had a role in the film. The movie was a worldwide hit and remains almost a cult favorite 10 years later. But did you know it was based on a non-fiction book called "Queenbees and Wannabees"?

In 2012, the New York Times Magazine published a detailed story about the sexual abuse of students at the Horace Mann School, an upscale private college preparatory school in the Bronx. As you might expect, the story got a lot of attention…but has prompted very little change.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk to the author of that article who has expanded the story into a new book called “Great Is The Truth:  Secrecy, Scandal, and the Quest for Justice at the Horace Mann School” .

Cornell University via Facebook

There’s a group at Cornell University called the Cornell Alliance for Science, and they are holding a special event this month featuring global leaders talking about food insecurity and the challenges of farmers in countries around the world. But one of the major topics has some people in the US questioning the efforts. The topic: Genetically Modified Organisms.

Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll hear the pros and cons of GMOs in the developing world.

Unfortunately, sexual assaults on college campuses are not unusual. This year, a new law took effect hoping to make students safer. Today on the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll hear if the Campus Save Act is making a difference in a state with a high assault rate.

We’ll also travel to Portugal and hear how art is helping students build self-esteem, find out how teachers can avoid cyber traps waiting for them on line, and spend an academic minute figuring out just how Mexican your favorite Mexican restaurant is.

Oxford University Press

There’s a well-funded suburban high school in the Midwest that has an issue. It’s racially diverse, but once classes begin the sessions are anything but integrated…and school officials can’t figure out why. Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, we’ll hear from one of the researchers called in to explain and help solve the racial achievement gap at Riverview High.

We’ll also spend an academic minute exploring the quality of your personal boredom.

Stop me if you’ve heard this before: A liberal arts education teaches students how to think. OK, I’m not really going to stop but yes, most of us have heard that little nugget more than once. The thing is over the past decade or three we’ve become more interested in the bottom line. Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, a discussion about the future the liberal arts, in what’s called the neoliberal age.

We’ll also hear how a group of performers are using comedy to teach about disability…and spend an academic minute with your lying liar kids.

What happens when you put regular people together with inmates in a prison? Sometimes you get the situation we had this summer in Northern New York when two inmates escaped from the prison in Dannemora with the alleged help of civilian staff members. But there are prisoners in northern New York who are enjoying a much more fulfilling interaction with people from the outside. Dr. Bob Cowser is a professor of English at St. Lawrence University in Canton, New York.

If someone tells you they are a science teacher…think about it, that really doesn’t narrow it down a whole lot. Earth science, chemistry, biology, astronomy, physics…these are all taught by science teachers. But it takes a special person to teach ocean science when there isn’t an ocean for hundreds of miles.

Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, we’ll hear the story of an ocean science teacher in a land locked state.

Recently there has been increased talk about the importance of teaching citizenship in schools.

We’ve had a conversation or two about it right here. But can citizenship education survive in an atmosphere of standardized testing and common core homogenization? Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk to a professor of democracy and education about teaching students to be good citizens in a democratic society.

We’ll also spend an academic minute celebrating the birthday of one of the building blocks of democratic society.

We all have a picture in our head about what the perfect learning environment looks and sounds like. Secluded, comfortable, quiet.

Yeah, that’s pretty much all wrong. Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk to the author of the book How We Learn…and learn how most of us get it all wrong.

We’ll also head to LA and hear how the schools are helping low income students get three solids a day.

The Academic Minute for 2015.5.18 - 5.22

May 22, 2015

 Monday, May 18 Abe Springer - Northern Arizona University   Springs and Sustainability Dr. Abe Springer is a professor of hydrogeology and ecohydrology at the School of Earth Sciences and Environmental Sustainability at Northern Arizona University. For the past 20 years, he has studied local and regional groundwater flow systems and the human impacts on them.  Tuesday, May 19 Michael Strager - West Virginia University            Protecting Water Resources Michael P.

This Week on The Academic Minute (2015.5.18)

May 18, 2015

Check in at AcademicMinute.org for all the great research featured every day.

Monday, May 18

Abe Springer of Northern Arizona University analyzes the vital role springs play in our environment.

Tuesday, May 19

Michael Strager of West Virginia University discusses the importance of mitigating chemical spills in our drinking water.

Wednesday, May 20

Albert Einstein College of Medicine's Betsy Herold details her work on a herpes simplex vaccine.

The Academic Minute for 2015.5.11 - 5.15

May 15, 2015

Catch up with The Academic Minute from 5.11- 5.15

Most educators agree that teaching ethics is an important part of a medical education. What they don’t agree on is when to start. Today on the Best Of Our Knowledge, we’ll talk about teaching ethics to medical students.

We’ll also hear from a college student about her education in the arts…and the effects starting early in life had on her progress.

Then a conversation about summer vacation…and keeping all that good education from the school year safe between your student’s ears.

This Week on The Academic Minute (2015.5.11)

May 11, 2015

This Week on The Academic Minute (2015.5.11 - 5.15)

 Monday, May 11
Jeff Sovern of St. John's University analyzes the complicated contracts we all sign.

Tuesday, May 12
Ryan Schacht of The University of Utah examines how our surroundings might dictate our reproductive desires.

Wednesday, May 13
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's Heidi Newberg explores the size of our galaxy.

The Academic Minute for 2015.5.4 - 5.8

May 8, 2015

Catch up with The Academic Minute from 5.4 - 5.8

This Week on The Academic Minute (2015.5.4)

May 4, 2015

Visit AcademicMinute.org for great new research featured every day.

Monday, May 4
Marina D'Angelo of The Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine discusses canine osteoarthritis.   

Tuesday, May 5
Elizabeth Basha of The University of the Pacific profiles the utility of drones in a non-military context.

Wednesday, May 6
Monmouth University's Lisa Dinella explores the gendered constructs inherent in children's toys.

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