Academic Minute

This week we’ll be featuring five winners of the 2012 Academic Minute Senior Superlatives.
 
Daniel Abrams of Northwestern University won the Most Likely to Blow Your Mind award for his research into how competition and cooperation determine the number of lefties within a society.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Connie Shemo of the State University of New York, Plattsburgh, explains the connection between the women’s foreign mission movement of the early twentieth century and two pioneering female doctors.

Connie Shemo is an associate professor of history at the State University of New York, Plattsburgh. Her teaching and research interests include U.S. women's history, Chinese history, and the history of medicine. She holds a Ph.D. from SUNY Binghamton.

About Dr. Shemo

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Timothy Lyons of the University of California Riverside explains the complex history of the Earth’s oxygen-rich oceans.


Timothy Lyons is a professor of biogeochemistry at the University of California, Riverside, where his current research explores the evolving ocean and atmosphere and their cause-and-effect relationships with the origin and evolution of life. His work has appeared in numerous academic journals and he holds a Ph.D. from Yale University.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Ian Kaplan of Purdue University explores the complex ecological and biological relationship between predators and their prey.

Ian Kaplan is an assistant professor of entomology at Purdue University where his lab seeks to apply theoretical principles from population and community ecology toward the sustainable management of crop pests. He holds a Ph.D. in entomology from the University of Maryland.

About Dr. Kaplan

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Carlos Badenes of the University of Pittsburgh examines the origin of one of the scientific revolution’s most important astronomical events.

Carlos Badenes is an assistant professor of astronomy at the University of Pittsburgh where his research is focused on stellar evolution and the origins of Type Ia supernovae. He is currently leading an effort to develop data mining techniques to examine the role of binary systems as possible progenitors of Type Ia supernovae. He holds a Ph.D. from the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya in Barcelona, Spain.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Michelle Miller of Northern Arizona University explains why some types of information are more easily remembered than others.


Michelle Miller is a professor of psychology at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, Arizona. Her research is generally focused on language and memory, and more specifically, how normal aging affects the ability to produce and comprehend language. Her work has appeared in a number of peer-reviewed journals and she holds a Ph.D. from the University of California Los Angeles.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Elisabeth Blagrove of the University of Warwick reveals why shapes can influence how we perceive faces.

Elisabeth Blagrove is a lecturer in psychology at the University of Warwick where her teaching and research interests include selective attention, processing of emotional faces, and social attention. Her work has appeared in many peer-reviewed journals and she holds a Ph.D. from the University of Warwick.

About Dr. Blagrove

Bruce Gilbert

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Stephanie Pfirman of Columbia University explains the importance of the geographic area destined to be the last refuge for year-round Arctic sea ice.

David Mitchell

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Jeff Lane of the University of Alberta reveals how shifting weather patterns are disrupting the life cycle of hibernating mammals.


Jeff Lane is a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Biological Sciences at the University of Alberta. His current research is focused on examining the temporal patterns of resource allocation in mammals, specifically, North American red squirrels and Columbian and Richardson’s ground squirrels. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Alberta. 

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Stuart Robbins of the University of Colorado Boulder explains his work mapping craters on the surface of Mars.

Pages