Academic Minute

Studying the fossilized remains of animals and plants can teach us a great deal about the natural world.

In today's Academic Minute, Dr. Peter Wilf, professor of geosciences at Penn State University, traces the path of conifer fossils from New Zealand to Argentina.

Advances in biotechnologies have been vital in the analysis of the DNA of the first peoples of America.

Dr. Ripan Malhi, associate professor of anthropology at the University of Illinois, Urbana, discusses both the importance and the difficulty of this type of research.

How will your fantasy baseball team do this season?

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Dae Kwak, assistant professor of sports management at the University of Michigan, discusses the psychological impact fantasy sports advertising has on even experienced players.

Is there a formula for delivering an effective speech?

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. William Doll, visiting fellow at Case Western Reserve University, outlines a few  rules for crafting an engaging oration.

People have an affinity for things.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Brent Plate, visiting associate professor of religious studies at Hamilton College, examines how objects can have a rich personal significance.

Smartphones are certainly convenient. But, is the use (and overuse) of these technological marvels also having harmful side effects?  

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Russell Johnson, professor at Michigan State University analyzes the negative consequences smartphone use may have on human psychology and physiology.

The extinction of a specific species is a sad reality in the animal kingdom.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Charles Marshall, professor at the University of California’s Berkeley campus discusses the mitigating factors that can contribute to the eventual dying out of a particular species of animal.

Dr. Charles Marshall is a professor of integrated biology at the University of California Berkeley. His research specializes in how paleontological studies can inform our knowledge of life today. He earned a PhD in evolutionary biology at the University of Chicago in 1989

Could organ donation and transplants become a relic of the past?

In Today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Sina Rabbany, professor and director of bioengineering at Hofstra University, discusses new insights into how blood vessels acquire characteristics, and how they might be  used to transform how we repair damaged organs.

How you feel is influenced directly by changes in the brain.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Russell Poldrack, professor at the University of Texas at Austin, discusses his findings of a 14 month study he conducted on his own brain.

Dr. Russell Poldrack is a professor of psychology and neurobiology, and the director of the University of Texas at Austin’s Imaging Research Center. His research primarily targets how new skills are acquired and implemented. He received his PhD in cognitive psychology from the University of Illinois in 1995.

The issue of bullying is a significant problem for some children.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Chad Jensen, assistant professor at Brigham Young University, suggests that the type of teasing a child may experience can have some very specific results, especially when focused on a child's physical activity and ability.

Dr. Chad Jensen is an assistant professor of psychology at Brigham Young University. His research focuses on the psychological and sociological aspects of childhood and adolescent obesity. He earned a PhD from the University of Kansas in 2011.

Today's Academic Minute delves into the creative process.

There is a saying that imitation may be the most sincere form of flattery, but we sometimes view imitators as lacking creativity of their own. But as Robert Goldstone, Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Indiana University, explains, this imitation may play a crucial role in the overall creative process.

Today's Academic Minute has intergalactic ramifications!

Some close calls have raised the awareness of the threat  of asteroids potentially on a collision course with Earth. David Trilling, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Northern Arizona University, explains what we can do if we're ever faced with such an interstellar calamity.

Today's Academic Minute takes us inside the world of professional sports.

Professional athletes are very well paid. Their skills on the field can be parlayed into huge contracts. But as Ken Sheldon, Professor of Psychology at the University of Missouri, explains, many players have trouble living up to expectations after the deal is signed.

Weather predictions indicate that some previously calm areas may begin to experience increased amounts of severe weather in the coming years.

In today's Academic Minute, Dr. Michael Bruno, Dean and Professor of Engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology, discusses how new imaging technology can be utilized to help inform those who may be in the path of these severe storms.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Gabriel Rossman of the University of California Los Angeles reveals the economic risks faced by filmmakers seeking to win Academy Awards. 

Gabriel Rossman is an associate professor of sociology at the University of California Los Angeles. His research addresses culture and mass media, especially pop music radio and Hollywood films. He earned his Ph.D. at Princeton University.

About Dr. Rossman

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Elliot Berkman of the University of Oregon reveals the limits of brain training. 

Elliot Berkman is an assistant professor of psychology and director of the Social and Affective Neuroscience Lab at the University of Oregon. The SAN Lab studies how motivational factors and neural systems influence goal pursuit. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of California Los Angeles.

About Dr. Berkman

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Nicholas Leadbeater of the University of Connecticut concludes his three-day examination of the chemistry of the show Breaking Bad. Leadbeater concludes the series with an examination of one of Walter White’s Greatest Escapes. 

  

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Nicholas Leadbeater of the University of Connecticut continues his examination of the chemistry of the show Breaking Bad. Today he discusses Walter White's use of acids to make evidence disappear. 

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Nicholas Leadbeater of the University of Connecticut begins a three-day examination of the chemistry of the hit television show Breaking Bad. Today, he discusses why Walter White’s product was so unique. 

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Michelle Sauther of the University of Colorado Boulder reveals a discovery about the preferred sleeping arrangements of lemurs.

 

In today’s Academic Minute,  Daniel Scott of the University of Waterloo discusses the potential inability for previous winter olympic host cities to host the games again due to changing weather patterns.

Prof. Daniel Scott is an associate professsor and research chair at the Univeristy of Waterloo focusing his studies on climate change. His particular interest lies in the interaction between  environmental issues and tourism and their connected impact on social, political and business issues.
 

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. William Cooper of Indiana University – Purdue University Fort Wayne explains why species that inhabit island are less frightened of human intruders.

 

William Cooper is a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Biology at Indiana University – Purdue University Fort Wayne. His research examines the ecological and evolutionary aspects of the behavior of lizards in the lab and field, including antipredatory behavior, the use of the chemical senses to identify food and predators, and social behavior.
 

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Seth Bruggeman of Temple University reveals why George Washington’s status as a Virginian made him a symbol of national unity. 

Seth Bruggeman is an associate professor of history and Director of the Center for Public History at Temple University. As a historian specializing in nineteenth- and twentieth-century United States cultural history, his research focuses on material culture, memory studies, and Public History. He earned his Ph.D. at the College of William and Mary.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Matthew Johnson of Binghamton University explains the link between poverty and marriage stability. 

Matthew Johnson is a professor of psychology at Binghamton University. He is director of the university's Marriage and Family Studies Laboratory, where he studies what makes marriages succeed or fail. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of California Los Angeles.

About Dr. Johnson

Dr. Matthew Johnson – Marriage and Poverty

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Jonathan Ruppert of York University describes the connection between shark population and reef health.

Jonathan Ruppert is a postdoctoral research associate in the Department of Biology at York University in Toronto, Canada. His current research project involves the long-term monitoring of the health of reefs on Australia’s northwest coast.  He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Toronto.

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In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Marie-Claire Beaulieu of Tufts University discusses how the Internet has increased access to ancient texts. 

Marie-Claire Beaulieu is an assistant professor in the Department of Classics at Tufts University where her teaching and research interests include Greek religion, Epigraphy, Medieval Latin, and digital humanities. She earned her Ph.D. at the University of Texas at Austin.

About Dr. Beaulieu

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Philip Marcus of the University of California Berkeley explains the persistence of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot. 

Philip Marcus is a professor of fluid dynamics at the University of California Berkeley where he heads the Computational Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. His research group is focused on the fluid dynamics of vortices, waves, turbulence, and hydrodynamic stability.

About Dr. Marcus

Dr. James Gibbs, SUNY ESF – Saving the Snow Leopard

Feb 10, 2014

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. James Gibbs of the State University of New York’s College of Environmental Science and Forestry explains the plight of the snow leopard.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Kevin Walsh of the University of York traces the history of the human occupation of Europe’s alpine region.  

Kevin Walsh is a senior lecturer in the Department of Archaeology at the University of York where he has overseen two major projects investigating the long term history of human activity in the Alps. His secondary area of interest relates to the politics of heritage conservation and display, a subject he addresses in The Representation of the Past. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Leicester.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Benjamin Black of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology discusses the connection between volcanism and one of the largest extinction events in Earth’s history. 

Ben Black is a postdoctoral researcher in geology and geochemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research seeks to understand the consequences of volcanism as it relates to the end-Permian mass extinction. He earned his Ph.D. at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

About Dr. Black

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