Academic Minute

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Sean Lane of Louisiana State University explains how the truth can become murky once a lie becomes part of the narrative. 

Sean Lane is an associate professor of psychology at Louisiana State University where his research seeks to understand how memory and cognitive processes are deployed in complex real-world events. His research has been widely published and he holds a Ph.D. from Kent State University.

About Dr. Lane

Dr. Sean Lane – Liars and Lying

This week we’ll be featuring five winners of The Academic Minute’s Third Annual Senior Superlatives.

Dr. Micah Berman of Ohio State University generated a real online buzz and won the Social Butterfly award for calculating the hidden costs an employer can expect to incur when hiring a smoker. 

This week we’ll be featuring five winners of The Academic Minute’s Third Annual Senior Superlatives.

Dr. Lars Hinrichs of the University of Texas at Austin won in the Best Smile category with this Academic Minute that explains why many features of Texas-English are disappearing.

This week we’ll be featuring five winners of The Academic Minute’s Third Annual Senior Superlatives.

Dr. John Broich of Case Western Reserve University took the President’s Award for teaching us about the contentious history of the municipal water supply. 

This week we’ll be featuring five winners of The Academic Minute's Third Annual Senior Superlatives.

Dr. Juliana Fernandes of the University of Miami earned the award in the Listener Choice category for her description of the downside of negative political ads. 

In today’s Academic Minute, Professor Robyn Metcalfe of the University of Texas at Austin explains the complex supply chain that keeps food on your table.

 Audio FileDr. Robyn Metcalfe, University of Texas at Austin – Logistics and Food SupplyEdit | Remove

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Christopher Kochanek of Ohio State University calculates the odds of a visible supernova occurring in the coming decades.

Christopher Kochanek is a professor of astronomy at Ohio State and the Ohio Eminent Scholar in Observational Cosmology. His research interests include cosmology and gravitational lensing. His astronomic research has been widely published and he holds a Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology.

About Dr. Kochanek

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Ken Noll of the University of Connecticut explains why Charles Dickens makes a descriptive reference to a glowing lobster.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Michael Phillips-Anderson of Monmouth University explores the effective use of humor by politicians.

Michael Phillips-Anderson is an assistant professor of communication at Monmouth University in West Long Branch, New Jersey. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Maryland College Park.

About Dr. Phillips-Anderson

Dr. Michael Phillips-Anderson – Presidents and Humor

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Timothy Hatton of the University of Essex discusses the factors behind the increase in average height over the past century.

Tim Hatton is a professor of economics at the University of Essex where his research is focused on economic history and applied economics. He has published extensively on the economic history of labor markets, including the issues of unemployment, poverty and the causes and effects of international migration. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Warwick.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Sujay Kaushal of the University of Maryland reveals how acid rain has made rivers and streams less acidic. 

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Robert Levenson of the University of California Berkeley explores the genetics nature of marital satisfaction.

 Audio FileDr. Robert Levenson, University of California Berkeley - Genetics of Marital BlissEdit | Remove

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Lisa Peschel of the University of York discusses the discovery of theatrical works that were only performed in World War II Jewish ghettos. 

Lisa Peschel is a lecturer in the Department of Theatre, Film, and Television at the University of York. Her research interests include theories of affect, identity and subjectivity, as well as understanding trauma, humour, and the role that theatrical performance plays within societies in crisis. She earned her Ph.D. at the University of Minnesota.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Francisco Beron-Vera discusses vortices that transport bodies of water around the globe.

Francisco Beron-Vera is a research associate professor in the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami. He research interests include the transport and mixing processes in geophysical fluids as well as geophysical fluid dynamics and thermodynamics.

About Dr. Beron-Vera

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Nadine Barlow of Northern Arizona University reveals why some craters on Mars have resisted erosion.

Nadine Barlow is a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Northern Arizona University. Her research focuses on impact craters throughout the solar system and how variations in their appearance provide information about the characteristics of the surface materials in which they form, such as the presence or lack of near-surface water and ice. She earned her Ph.D. at the University of Arizona.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Bazbek Davletov of the University of Sheffield explains why Botox could be the next great pain medication. 

Bazbek Davletov is the Chair in Biomedical Science at the University of Sheffield where he is working on developing treatments for chronic pain and cancer using protein stapling. Professor Davletov designed this new therapeutic approach while working at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, UK. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Candi Cann of Baylor University reveals the rising popularity of alternative memorials to the dead. 

Candi Cann is an assistant professor in the Honors College and Department of Interdisciplinary Core at Baylor University in Waco, Texas. Her research focuses on death and dying, and the impact of remembering (and forgetting) in shaping how lives are recalled, remembered and celebrated. She holds a Ph.D. from Harvard University.

About Dr. Cann

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Martin Hasselmann of the University of Cologne discusses the genetic process that determines the sex of honey bees.

Martin Hasselmann is a Heisenberg Fellow in the Institute for Genetics at the University of Cologne. He leads a group that studies genetic variation among honey bees and the molecular processes that influence their behavior and evolution.

About Dr. Hasselmann

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Sara DeLeon of Drexel reveals how exposure to environmental pollutants can alter the performance of bird songs. 

Sara DeLeon is a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Biology at Drexel University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. DeLeon conducted the research project into PCBs and bird songs while earning her doctorate at Cornell University.

About Dr. DeLeon's research

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Erick Galbraith of McGill University explains how climate change could alter ocean currents and the marine nitrogen cycle. 

Eric Galbraith is an assistant professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. As a marine biochemist, his research uses observations of the modern ocean, computer simulations of ocean biogeochemistry, and sedimentary records of past climate change to examine the connections between climate and marine ecosystems. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of British Columbia.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Lynsey Romo of North Carolina State University reveals why extreme weight loss can be rough on a romantic relationship. 

Lynsey Romo is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication at North Carolina State University. Her research explores how people communicate about uncomfortable issues, specifically those pertaining to health and finances. She has also examined how couples can effectively motivate one another to engage in healthier eating and exercise behaviors. She earned her Ph.D. at the University of Texas at Austin.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. David Hsu of the University of Michigan explains how the brain deals with the pain of social rejection. 

David Hsu is an assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of Michigan. His research interests include the neuroimaging of mood and anxiety disorders using fMRI and PET scans, the neurobiology of stress in the context of social environments, and the neuroanatomical pathways for emotional responses to stress.  He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Susan Fiske of Princeton University reveals what baseball rivalries can teach us about why we sometime take delight in the misfortune of others. 

Susan Fiske is the Eugene Higgins Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs at Princeton University. Her research addresses how stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination are encouraged or discouraged by social relationships, such as cooperation, competition, and power. She holds a Ph.D. from Harvard University.

About Dr. Fiske

2013 Listener Choice Award

Dec 3, 2013

In a few weeks, we will be announcing the winners of our Third Annual Senior Superlatives to honor the hard work professors from around the world have put into The Academic Minute in the past year. Below are the nominees for the Listener Choice award. If you don’t already have a favorite, take a few moments to listen before heading over to our Facebook page to vote. Voting will close at the end of the day (5pm Eastern) on Thursday, December 12th. 

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Justin Denney of Rice University reveals the connection between social status and the likelihood of death in a preventable accident. 

Justin Denney is an assistant professor of sociology and Associate Director of the Kinder Institute Urban Health Program at Rice University. His primary research is focused on identifying individual and structural conditions that jointly contribute to health and mortality inequalities.

About Dr. Denney

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Simone Riehl of the University of Tübingen discusses where and when agriculture arose. 

Simone Riehl is a senior researcher in archaeobotany at the Institute for Archaeological Sciences at the University of Tübingen. Her research interests include palaeoethnobotany, the emergence and development of agriculture, and palaeoecology and environmental archaeology of the Middle East. She earned her Ph.D. at the University of Tübingen.

In today’s Academic Minute, Prof. Nancy Prideaux of the University of Texas at Austin reveals the year-long process behind the biggest retail shopping day of the year.

Nancy Prideaux is Director of the UT in NYC program and a senior lecturer in the School of Human Ecology at the University of Texas at Austin.  Her research is focused on apparel retail and visual merchandising and she has taught a variety of courses in the Textiles and Apparel curriculum at the University of Texas.

About Prof. Prideaux

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Harvey Markowitz of Washington and Lee University discusses portrayal of Native Americans in Hollywood and a recent high-profile flop.

Harvey Markowitz is an assistant professor sociology and anthropology at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia. His research examines the inter-relationships among American Indian religions, landscapes, cultures, histories, and identities. He recently co-edited the book Seeing Red: Hollywood’s Pixeled Skins.

In today’s Academic Minute, Professor Ethan Ham of the City College of New York examines what makes an interesting choice and entertaining game.

Ethan Ham is an associate professor of electronic design and multimedia at the City College of New York. He is also a contemporary artist whose artwork often draws upon his background as a game developer. Prior to entering academia, Ethan worked in the computer game industry for eleven years as a game designer, a game programmer, and a game producer.

About Prof. Ham

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Ayalla Ruvio of Michigan State University explains the relationship between stress and compulsive shopping. 

Ayalla Ruvio is an assistant professor of marketing at Michigan State University.  As an applied consumer behavior researcher, her work focuses on issues such as consumers' decision making regarding new products, identity and consumption, and cross-cultural consumer behavior. Her research has been published in a number of refereed journals and she is co-author of the book Identity and Consumption.

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