actor

  Tina Packer is one of the country’s foremost experts on Shakespeare and theatre arts and now the actor, director, and master teacher offers an exploration of the women of Shakespeare’s plays in her new book: Women of Will: Following the Feminine in Shakespeare's Plays.

  Best known as Ari Gold, the agent you love to hate on HBO's Entourage, Emmy and Golden Globe winner Jeremy Piven has one of Hollywood's coolest and most diverse resumes.

Piven surprised audiences by taking on the title role in the British series, Mr. Selfridge which is about the real-life department store's mogul which airs on Masterpiece on PBS and has its 3rd season premiere this Sunday, March 29th.

  Chicago: The Musical will paint the town - and all that jazz - at The Palace in Albany, NY this Friday and Saturday for three performances.

With music by John Kander, lyrics by Fred Ebb and a book by Ebb and Bob Fosse, Chicago is a powerhouse American musical created in a faux vaudeville style that tells the prohibition-era celebrity-criminal story of Roxie Hart and Velma Kelly - two "might"-be murderesses trying to beat their charges with guts, gusto, and iconic Fosse choreography.

Jacob Keith Watson plays Amos Hart, Roxie’s quietly suffering spouse who is -by all accounts- making his "Mr. Cellophane" impossible to overlook.

JOAN MARCUS

  Jim Dale started his professional career as a seventeen year old comedian playing the Music Halls of Britain. A little down the road he became a pop singing star during the early days of rock and roll and appeared in fourteen of the legendary Carry On films for the British cinema.

At the request of Laurence Olivier he joined the British National Theatre. He starred in the first Musical by Cameron Mackintosh, The Card, and played Fagin in Oliver! at the London Palladium. He first appeared on the American stage in 1973 - in 1980 he won the Tony Award for his work in Barnum.

Proctors in Schenectady will take on a downstate feel on Sunday, March 22 when Academy Award-nominated actor Chazz Palminteri performs his one-man show A Bronx Tale, which became a beloved movie of the same name directed by Robert de Niro.

'Souvenir' At TheRep

Mar 11, 2015

  At the turn of the last century, Florence Foster Jenkins was a New York phenomenon where she rose to fame for her annual sold-out recitals at the Ritz Carlton and Carnegie Hall. Crowds went wild when Mrs. Jenkins tackled the most difficult arias in opera, festooned in fabulous costumes.

The only trouble was: Mrs. Jenkins could not sing. Not a note. Still, Florence, a YouTube sensation far ahead of her time, could not be deterred from her dedication to music and voice lessons with her accomplished and compassionate accompanist, Cosme McMoon.

Souvenir is a play by Stephen Temperley about Florence Foster Jenkins and Cosme McMoon. It is currently running at Capital Repertory Theatre in Albany, NY. The production is directed by CapRep’s Producing Artistic Director, Maggie Mancinelli-Cahill.

Jonas Cohen plays afore mentioned “compassionate accompanist,” Cosme McMoon and he joins us to discuss the play.

JOAN MARCUS

  The classic American musical, Annie, is at Proctors in Schenectady this week in a touring production which chooses to eschew recent adaptations and modifications to spin back to the pure fun of the original Broadway production.

Opening last night, the new tour is staged by Annie’s original lyricist-director Martin Charnin. Featuring book and score by Charnin and Tony Award®-winners Thomas Meehan, and Charles Strouse. Annie includes - as if we needed to tell you - such unforgettable songs as "Easy Street," "I Don't Need Anything But You," and "Tomorrow."

And what would Annie’s story be without her ultimately-adoptive father - Oliver “Daddy” Warbucks? In this touring company, Daddy Warbucks is played by Gilgamesh Taggett.

  Does acting matter?

David Thomson, one of our most respected and insightful writers on movies and theater, answers this question in his essay, Why Acting Matters.

Thomson tackles this most elusive of subjects, examining the allure of the performing arts for both the artist and the audience member while addressing the paradoxes inherent in acting itself. He reflects on the casting process, on stage versus film acting, and on the cult of celebrity.

    

  It all begins when sweet Nan and her out-of-work webmaster hubby, Steve, realize they can't afford to keep up the extravagant gift giving that has become their family's tradition. In an effort to make everyone happy, they announce that they have made a gift to a charity in everyone's name. Except it's a fictitious charity. No problem — until the website that Steve creates to seal the deal becomes prey to cyberspace hijinks, with deliciously funny and unpredictable results.

This is the plot of the play How Water Behaves by Sherry Kramer – the world premiere of which is currently running at Capital Repertory Theatre in Albany, NY. The show is directed by acclaimed theatre director Gordon Greenberg and co-stars Nisi Sturgis as Nan and Michael McCorry Rose as Hank.

  Change is no stranger to us in the twenty-first century. We must constantly adjust to an evolving world, to transformation and innovation. But for many thousands of creative artists, a torrent of recent changes has made it all but impossible to earn a living.

A persistent economic recession, social shifts, and technological change have combined to put our artists—from graphic designers to indie-rock musicians, from architects to booksellers—out of work. Culture Crash: The Killing of the Creative Class looks deeply and broadly into the roots of the crisis of the creative class in America and tells us why it matters. Scott Timberg considers the human cost as well as the unintended consequences of shuttered record stores, decimated newspapers, music piracy, and a general attitude of indifference.

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