Proctors in Schenectady will take on a downstate feel on Sunday, March 22 when Academy Award-nominated actor Chazz Palminteri performs his one-man show A Bronx Tale, which became a beloved movie of the same name directed by Robert de Niro.

'Souvenir' At TheRep

Mar 11, 2015

  At the turn of the last century, Florence Foster Jenkins was a New York phenomenon where she rose to fame for her annual sold-out recitals at the Ritz Carlton and Carnegie Hall. Crowds went wild when Mrs. Jenkins tackled the most difficult arias in opera, festooned in fabulous costumes.

The only trouble was: Mrs. Jenkins could not sing. Not a note. Still, Florence, a YouTube sensation far ahead of her time, could not be deterred from her dedication to music and voice lessons with her accomplished and compassionate accompanist, Cosme McMoon.

Souvenir is a play by Stephen Temperley about Florence Foster Jenkins and Cosme McMoon. It is currently running at Capital Repertory Theatre in Albany, NY. The production is directed by CapRep’s Producing Artistic Director, Maggie Mancinelli-Cahill.

Jonas Cohen plays afore mentioned “compassionate accompanist,” Cosme McMoon and he joins us to discuss the play.


  The classic American musical, Annie, is at Proctors in Schenectady this week in a touring production which chooses to eschew recent adaptations and modifications to spin back to the pure fun of the original Broadway production.

Opening last night, the new tour is staged by Annie’s original lyricist-director Martin Charnin. Featuring book and score by Charnin and Tony Award®-winners Thomas Meehan, and Charles Strouse. Annie includes - as if we needed to tell you - such unforgettable songs as "Easy Street," "I Don't Need Anything But You," and "Tomorrow."

And what would Annie’s story be without her ultimately-adoptive father - Oliver “Daddy” Warbucks? In this touring company, Daddy Warbucks is played by Gilgamesh Taggett.

  Does acting matter?

David Thomson, one of our most respected and insightful writers on movies and theater, answers this question in his essay, Why Acting Matters.

Thomson tackles this most elusive of subjects, examining the allure of the performing arts for both the artist and the audience member while addressing the paradoxes inherent in acting itself. He reflects on the casting process, on stage versus film acting, and on the cult of celebrity.


  It all begins when sweet Nan and her out-of-work webmaster hubby, Steve, realize they can't afford to keep up the extravagant gift giving that has become their family's tradition. In an effort to make everyone happy, they announce that they have made a gift to a charity in everyone's name. Except it's a fictitious charity. No problem — until the website that Steve creates to seal the deal becomes prey to cyberspace hijinks, with deliciously funny and unpredictable results.

This is the plot of the play How Water Behaves by Sherry Kramer – the world premiere of which is currently running at Capital Repertory Theatre in Albany, NY. The show is directed by acclaimed theatre director Gordon Greenberg and co-stars Nisi Sturgis as Nan and Michael McCorry Rose as Hank.

  Change is no stranger to us in the twenty-first century. We must constantly adjust to an evolving world, to transformation and innovation. But for many thousands of creative artists, a torrent of recent changes has made it all but impossible to earn a living.

A persistent economic recession, social shifts, and technological change have combined to put our artists—from graphic designers to indie-rock musicians, from architects to booksellers—out of work. Culture Crash: The Killing of the Creative Class looks deeply and broadly into the roots of the crisis of the creative class in America and tells us why it matters. Scott Timberg considers the human cost as well as the unintended consequences of shuttered record stores, decimated newspapers, music piracy, and a general attitude of indifference.

  Jersey Boys, is the Tony, Grammy and Olivier Award-winning Best Musical about Rock and Roll Hall of Famers The Four Seasons: Frankie Valli, Bob Gaudio, Tommy DeVito and Nick Massi. It tells the story of how four blue-collar kids became one of the greatest successes in pop music history. They wrote their own songs, invented their own sounds and sold 175 million records worldwide – all before they were 30!

Jersey Boys features their hit songs “Sherry,” “Big Girls Don’t Cry,” “Rag Doll,” “Oh What a Night” and “ Can’t Take My Eyes Off You” – and many others.

The National Tour of the show is at Proctors in Schenectady tonight through Sunday as part of the Key Private Bank Broadway Series at Proctors and we are joined by Hayden Milanes who plays Frankie Valli and Drew Seeley who plays Bob Gaudio.

  Danny Aiello admits that he backed into his acting career by mistake. That’s easy to see when you begin at the beginning: Raised by his loving and fiercely resilient mother in the tenements of Manhattan and the South Bronx, and forever haunted by the death of his infant brother, Danny struggled early on to define who he was and who he could be. Shoeshine boy, numbers runner, and pool hustler were among the first identities he tried on.

After getting into trouble on the streets, he enlisted in the army at seventeen, served in Germany, and was honorably discharged. Later, as an unemployed high school dropout raising a family of his own, Danny was burdened with serious depression by the time he landed a job as a bouncer at a Hell’s Kitchen comedy club. Taking to the stage in the wee hours to belt out standards, Danny Aiello found his voice and his purpose: He was born to act.

He write about all that and more in his new memoir, I Only Know Who I Am When I Am Somebody Else: My Life on the Street, On the Stage, and in the Movies.

  In the play, Circle Mirror Transformation, an unlikely collection of strangers sign up for Marty's "Adult Creative Drama" class: a recently divorced carpenter, a high school junior, a former actress, and Marty's husband.

The group plays Marty's imaginative (and sometimes awkward) theatre games. But as their relationships develop over the course of the summer, the seemingly silly games generate some real-life drama.

Performing Arts of Woodstock presents Circle Mirror Transformation on the next two weekends. Here now to tell us more are, Molly Parker Myers (playing Theresa); Julie Szabo, (playing Marty, teacher of the acting class in the play); David Rose, (playing James).

    Brandy Burre had a recurring role on HBO’s The Wire when she gave up her career to start a family. While living with her family in Beacon, NY she decides to reclaim her life as an actor and the domestic world she’s carefully created crumbles around her.

The documentary film, Actress is both a present tense portrait of a dying relationship and an exploration of a woman, performing the role of herself.

Actress will screen at Upstate Films in Woodstock, NY on November 29th at 5pm and Brandy Burre and filmmaker, Robert Greene will both be in attendance for a discussion following the film.