Adirondacks

WAMC/Pat Bradley

The Adirondacks came to life at the state capitol in Albany Monday as a wide sector of interests were showcased during Adirondack Day.

NYS Department of Environmental Conservation

Protect the Adirondacks has received permission from the New York State Appellate Court to continue with a lawsuit challenging a state snowmobile trail building plan in the Adirondack Park.

WAMC Photo

New York State has lost a two-and-a-half million dollar federal grant that would have helped pay for the acquisition of an Adirondack land tract.  The state says it can’t afford the cost share, and the Adirondack Council points to that as a reason to increase funding to the Environmental Protection Fund.

picture of trees in snow
WAMC

State forest rangers say they had to rescue two men who started a nearly 40-mile hike in the Adirondack High Peaks while improperly clothed for the below freezing conditions and carrying only two bagels and one canteen of water.

WAMC

A heroism medal that is rarely handed out by the Boy Scouts of America has been presented to three men in the Adirondacks. 

A formal Court of Honor was held at Paul Smiths’ College to recognize the efforts of three scouts who rescued one man, and attempted to rescue a second, following a whitewater kayaking accident in the Adirondacks in October 2011.  Dave Tallman presented the trio the highest medal of heroism from the Boy Scouts of America.

WAMC

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman has announced a new grant program designed to mitigate the effects of acid rain in Adirondack water bodies.

The 400-thousand dollar Adirondack Acid Rain Recovery grant program has been created as part of a multi-state legal settlement with Cinergy, formerly Duke Energy, over Clean Air Act violations.  Jeremy Magliaro,  an environmental policy analyst with the New York Attorney General’s office, says the funds are intended to hasten lake and stream recovery from acid rain deposition.

Pat Arnow

Governor Andrew Cuomo presented a broad agenda in his State of the State address on Wednesday. North Country officials were pleased with the Governor’s focus on the upstate economy and tourism.

The Adirondack Park Agency has delayed action on a simplified permit process for clear-cutting Adirondack forest tracts of more than 25 acres.

Under a new General Permit proposal, the Adirondack Park Agency says a simplified silvicultural treatment that “meets jurisdictional clearcutting thresholds” would encourage sustainable forestry practices.   Protect the Adirondacks is one of several environmental groups that wants the state agency to reject the proposal. Executive Director Peter Bauer says the APA has not proven a new permit process is needed.

WAMC

An environmental group is proposing that more than half of the Adirondack land purchased by the state this past summer be classified wilderness.

Lab tests have confirmed that a New York professor contracted the potentially deadly hantavirus during a hiking trip in the Adirondacks.

A spokeswoman for Stony Brook University on Long Island said Monday the results were confirmed late last week. Doctors suspected the university professor contracted the disease after an August camping trip.

The professor has since recovered.

WAMC

The Adirondack Council has released their annual State of the Park report, reviewing the actions of individuals, agencies and lawmakers and the subsequent impact on the 6-million acre Adirondack Park.

Going for a hike in the Adirondacks doesn't cost anything, but one elected official in the North Country thinks New York state should start charging for the privilege.

Crown Point Town Supervisor Charles Harrington tells the Press-Republican of Plattsburgh that he wants to explore the idea of charging a fee for using public hiking trails in the Adirondacks. He says the fees could generate significant revenue for the state.

Harrington says hikers could buy state-issued permits using an Internet-based payment system.

Health officials are investigating a case of the potentially deadly hantavirus. It was contracted by a Long Island man bitten by a mouse while camping in the Adirondacks.

Doctors treating Michael Vaughan of Stony Brook said preliminary tests indicated he contracted the viral illness. Samples have since been sent to state health officials and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta for confirmation. Results are expected next week.

WAMC

The seasons, and the foliage, is changing.  Tourism officials are optimistic that the fall color will help make up for losses last year.

Last autumn, Vermont and northern New York were recovering from Tropical Storm Irene. Publicity kept some leaf-peepers away, and many businesses are hoping for a rebound this year.  Vermont Department of Tourism And Marketing Commissioner Megan Smith says fall foliage is a crucial season for the state’s economy.

Authorities say a small plane that was forced to land on an Adirondack lake last week had lost its propeller in midair.

State police tell the Adirondack Daily Enterprise that the privately owned, single-engine Jabiru was flying at about 6,500 feet last Thursday when the propeller came off. The pilot managed to crash-land the plane in Gull Lake in northern Herkimer County.

He and his passenger were rescued soon after by New York Air National Guard helicopter crews flying to Fort Drum.

The plane went down in Gull Lake in the Herkimer County town of Webb,  about 60 miles northeast of Syracuse.

State police say the two people on board weren't seriously hurt.

Adirondack Daily Enterprise reports that two New York Air National Guard Blackhawks were on a training mission when mayday calls came in about the accident at about 9 a.m. Thursday and helped rescue the two people.

 The helicopters took them to the U.S. Army's Fort Drum to be checked out.

WAMC

Governor Andrew Cuomo on Sunday announced that New York State had purchased 69,000 acres of land from the Nature Conservancy. It’s  the largest acquisition of Adirondack lands in more than a century.

With over 6 million acres, New York’s Adirondack Park is the largest park, state level protected area, and national historic landmark in the contiguous United States.

Those who live and love the Adirondacks face many issues, including how best to preserve the environmental integrity of the park while also accomadating those who live there.

Joining us today to discuss these issues are John Sheehan, communications director with the Adirondack Council, and Fred Monroe, executive director of the Adirondack Park Local Government Review Board. WAMC’s Alan Chartock hosts.

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