adoption

  In 1979, Liz Pryor was a seventeen-year-old girl from a good family in the wealthy Chicago suburbs. Halfway through her senior year of high school, she discovered she was pregnant—a fact her parents are determined to keep a secret from her friends, siblings, and community forever.

One snowy January day, after driving across three states, her mother dropped her off at what Liz thinks is a Catholic home for unwed mothers—but which is, in truth, a locked government-run facility for delinquent and impoverished pregnant teenage girls.

Liz Pryor has written her story in the new book, Look at You Now. Pryor has written a deeply moving story and she share with us this morning. Liz Pryor is an author, speaker, parenting columnist, and life advice expert. She currently serves as ABC’s Good Morning America on-air life advice guru. 

  Author and former radio host Claude Knobler shared the very beginning of his journey as a parent in this 2008 interview “Life is Wonderfully Ridiculous” for NPR’s This I Believe series: after reading a New York Times magazine story about an orphanage in Ethiopia, he told his wife Mary, that maybe they could help, trying to impress her with his generosity and kind heart, but never really believing she’d say yes.

And so alongside the seven year old son and five year old daughter they already had, Claude and Mary Knobler adopted Nati, a five year old Ethiopian boy who spoke no English to join their family in Los Angeles. That was twelve years ago.

In his book, More Love, Less Panic, Knobler weaves together moving stories about trying to turn his loud, spirited, and “too happy” African son into a quiet, neurotic, Jewish kid like he himself had once been, quickly learning a lesson that made him a better father – not just to Nati, but to all three of his kids.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY)

U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand is announcing legislation to remove legal barriers to adoption by lesbian, gay and transgender parents.

  Already the biological parents of a seven-year-old son and a five-year-old daughter, Claude Knobler and his wife decided to adopt Nati, a five-year-old Ethiopian boy who seemed different from Knobler in every conceivable way.

In his book, More Love, Less Panic: 7 Lessons I Learned About Life, Love, and Parenting After We Adopted Our Son from Ethiopia, explains how his experiences raising Nati led him to learn a lesson that applied equally well to parenting his biological children: It’s essential to spend the time we are given with our children to love them and enjoy them, rather than push and mold them into who we think they should be.

Clifton Park, NY – Betsy Bitner is a writing living in Clifton Park, NY. She has learned to share her daughter's love of beats.

  In her new book, Rescuing Julia Twice, Tina Traster tells foreign-adoption story - from dealing with the bleak landscape and inscrutable adoption handlers in Siberia, to her feelings of inexperience and ambivalence at being a new mother in her early forties, to her growing realization over months then years that something was “not quite right” with her daughter, Julia, who remained cold and emotionally detached.

Jim Levulis / WAMC

The Massachusetts Joint Committee on Children, Families & Persons with Disabilities was in Pittsfield today for a public hearing.

Yad Jaura

  Formed in the late 1970s in Coventry, England - The Selecter was one of the early acts to sign to 2 Tone Records, home to Madness, The Beat and The Specials. They became an integral part of the emerging ska scene, setting themselves apart from the pack by being one of the only female fronted ska bands. Led by the fashionable and talented Pauline Black, The Selecter released a number of seminal singles on 2 Tone including “On My Radio,” “Three Minute Hero,” and “Missing Words.” A couple of these songs made it on their 1980 debut LP, Too Much Pressure, which charted in the Top 5 in the UK.

On Halloween in 2010, Pauline Black and Arthur “Gaps” Hendrickson celebrated the 30th anniversary of Too Much Pressure with The Selecter performing the album live at the Sinners Day Festival in Belgium. This event kicked off the current revitalized incarnation of the legendary band who has continued to write and release new music. Their latest record, String Theory, came out earlier this year.

Pauline Black was born to an Anglo-Jewish teenage mother and Nigerian father and was adopted and raised by a white middle-aged couple. She wrote about her life and experience discovering her roots in Black By Design: A 2-Tone Memoir.