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In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their series of conversations about quoting, sampling, borrowing in music.

  In Identity Unknown, Donna Seaman brings to life seven forgotten female artists, among the best of their day: Gertrude Abercrombie, with her dark, surreal paintings and friendships with Dizzy Gillespie and Sonny Rollins; Bay Area self-portraitist Joan Brown; Ree Morton, with her witty, oddly beautiful constructions; Loïs Mailou Jones of the Harlem Renaissance; Lenore Tawney, who combined weaving and sculpture when art and craft were considered mutually exclusive; Christina Ramberg, whose unsettling works drew on pop culture and advertising; and Louise Nevelson, an art-world superstar in her heyday but omitted from recent surveys of her era.

Donna Seaman is Editor, Adult Books, Booklist, a member of the advisory council for the American Writers Museum, and a recipient of the James Friend Memorial Award for Literary Criticism and the Studs Terkel Humanities Service Award. 

She will be at Oblong Books and Music in Rhinebeck on Saturday, February 25.

  The movies you watch, the TV shows you adore, the concerts and sporting events you attend — behind the curtain of nearly all of these is an immensely powerful and secretive corporation known as Creative Artists Agency. Started in 1975, when five bright and brash employees of a creaky William Morris office left to open their own, strikingly innovative talent agency, CAA would come to revolutionize the entertainment industry, and over the next several decades its tentacles would spread aggressively throughout the worlds of movies, television, music, advertising, and investment banking.

In Powerhouse, James Andrew Miller draws on unprecedented and exclusive access to the men and women who built and battled with CAA, as well as financial information never before made public.

Paul Elisha: Safety On The Roadways

Jun 24, 2014

Catching sight of a TV photo of conservative mischief-maker, Ralph Reed, (former anti-Indian tribes lobbying crony of the notorious Jack Abramoff) in the late news, recently, announcing that he was preparing once again to organize young Christians in a typical chapter of Ralph Reed chicanery, strongly reminded this pundit of the wisdom shared by Confucius, in his Analects, that: “Learning without thought is labor lost; while thought without learning is perilous.”  In light of all the sudden public angst about this Nation’s seemingly unsuccessful efforts to establish a well-functioning system of public education, the last thing we need is any kind of input by the likes of the crafty Mr. Reed.  Apparently, though, there is more than a little need of constructive concern, on the part of all of us, about how our young people are being educated and this brought to mind Marshall McLuhan, he of “The Medium Is The Message” fame.

  How should a company respond if a consumer asks it to stop tracking his or her behavior on the company’s website? And what role should a browser play in helping consumers communicate their preferences regarding online tracking? These are questions we will look to answer with our tech guru, Jesse Feiler.

Jesse is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in iOS, FileMaker databases, and technologies for small businesses, nonprofits, and municipal governments. His most recent books are iWork for Dummies, Sams Teach Yourself Core Data in 24 Hours, and its companion Objective-C in 24 Hours.

His app, Minutes Machine for iPad, is available on the App Store. It helps nonprofits, homeowner associations, and small businesses manage meetings and generate minutes in real-time. His website is northcountryconsulting.com.

A political action committee has taken down two online ads after learning that it is illegal to use the Vermont state seal in an advertisement.

The Burlington Free Press reports that the state elections director notified the Vermonters First PAC on Wednesday that violating the state law carries a penalty of up to a year in prison and a $1,000 fine. The ads in question promoted Republican candidates Vince Illuzzi and Wendy Wilton, who are running for state auditor and treasurer, and showed images of the Vermont state flag, which carries the seal.