Affordable Care Act

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — The federal health care overhaul law is providing both challenges and opportunities for Connecticut lawmakers as they try to reach a state budget compromise with Gov. Dannel P. Malloy.

Malloy's two-year, $43.8 billion proposal includes millions of dollars in spending needed to comply with the federal health care law. But it also relies on millions of dollars in savings that the law generates.

When it comes to federal money to help states set up health care exchanges under the Affordable Care Act, you might expect that California would rank first and New York second. But here's a surprise: Vermont ranks number 3.

Most pundits have been describing last week's elections as a victory for the status quo, with President Obama being reelected and Democrats retaining control of the Senate despite the timid economic recovery and despite SuperPACs spending nearly a billion dollars on largely negative campaign ads. From a health and science policy perspective, however, nothing could be further from the truth.

For more on the U.S. Supreme Court ruling on health care reform, WAMC’S Brian Shields spoke with Vassar College economics professor Shirley Johnson-Lans, author of The Health Economics Primer, who says the upholding by the court of the individual mandate requiring those who can afford it to buy health insurance is the backbone of the Obama plan.

This morning, the U.S. Supreme Court announced their majority decision to uphold most of the provisions of President Barack Obama’s landmark health care reform policy, including the mandate that all citizens purchase health insurance.

What does this ruling mean for the health, economy, and presidential politics of the country?

       Leora Harpaz, a professor at Western New England University School of Law, spoke with WAMC's Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill about the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to uphold key provisions of the Affordable Care Act.

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