Afghanistan war

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Wed February 18, 2015

'88 Days to Kandahar: A CIA Diary' By Robert L. Grenier

  The First American-Afghan War, a CIA war, was approved by President George W. Bush and directed by the author, Robert Grenier, the CIA station chief in Islamabad. Forging separate alliances with warlords, Taliban dissidents, and Pakistani intelligence, Grenier launched the “southern campaign,” orchestrating the final defeat of the Taliban and Hamid Karzai’s rise to power in eighty-eight chaotic days.

Grenier writes about the war - what happened and what is meant - in his book, 88 Days to Kandahar: A CIA Diary.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Thu January 29, 2015

'The Reaper: Autobiography Of One Of The Deadliest Special Ops Snipers'

  Nicholas Irving became the first African American sniper assigned to the Army's Third Ranger Battalion, which had fought in Somalia in the historic "Black Hawk Down" mission.

His autobiographer, The Reaper, was released this week and coincides with the controversy over the hist film, American Sniper, about the most lethal sniper in US history.

Irving's fascinating story tells of his bloody final tour in Afghanistan that made him a legend and earned him the nickname, "Reaper," after he set a record for enemy kills on a single deployment.

His first-person account of his development into an expert assassin offers a rare view of special operations combat missions through the eyes of a Ranger sniper during war.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Mon January 26, 2015

'Thieves Of State: Why Corruption Threatens Global Security' By Sarah Chayes

  The world is blowing up. Every day a new blaze seems to ignite: the bloody implosion of Iraq and Syria; the East-West standoff in Ukraine; abducted schoolgirls in northern Nigeria. Is there some thread tying these frightening international security crises together?

In a riveting account that weaves history with fast-moving reportage and insider accounts from the Afghanistan war, Sarah Chayes identifies the unexpected link - corruption - in her book, Thieves of State: Why Corruption Threatens Global Security.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Thu January 15, 2015

Jack Fairweather On Why We Couldn’t Win The War Or The Peace In Afghanistan

  In its earliest days, the American-led war in Afghanistan appeared to be a triumph — a "good war" in comparison to the debacle in Iraq. It has since turned into one of the longest and most costly wars in U.S. history. The story of how this good war went so bad may well turn out to be a defining tragedy of the 21st century — yet as acclaimed war correspondent Jack Fairweather explains, it should also give us reason to hope.

In The Good War, Fairweather provides the first full narrative history of the war in Afghanistan, from the 2001 invasion to the 2014 withdrawal.

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The Roundtable
9:00 am
Tue December 30, 2014

12/30/14 Panel

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Associate Editor of the Times Union, Mike Spain, and political consultant Libby Post.

Topics include Afghanistan War ending, Steve Scalise of Louisiana Acknowledges Addressing Racist Group, and the ferry fire off the coast of Greece.

The Roundtable
11:48 am
Tue May 27, 2014

"No Good Men Among The Living: America, The Taliban, And The War Through Afghan Eyes" By Anand Gopal

    In No Good Men Among The Living: America, The Taliban, And The War Through Afghan Eyes acclaimed journalist Anand Gopal traces in vivid detail the lives of three Afghans caught in America’s war on terror. He follows a Taliban commander, who rises from scrawny teenager to leading insurgent; a US-backed warlord, who uses the American military to gain personal wealth and power; and a village housewife trapped between the two sides, who discovers the devastating cost of neutrality.

Through their dramatic stories, Gopal shows that the Afghan war, so often regarded as a hopeless quagmire, could in fact have gone very differently. Top Taliban leaders actually tried to surrender within months of the US invasion, renouncing all political activity and submitting to the new government. Effectively, the Taliban ceased to exist—yet the Americans were unwilling to accept such a turnaround. Instead, driven by false intelligence from their allies and an unyielding mandate to fight terrorism, American forces continued to press the conflict, resurrecting the insurgency that persists to this day.

The Roundtable
9:00 am
Thu November 21, 2013

11/21/13 Panel

  Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Executive Editor of the Poughkeepsie Journal, Stu Shinske, and University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
Afghan Pact
Nuclear Option?
Kennedy Conspiracy Poll
Congressman Cocaine
A-Rod

Hudson Valley News
8:48 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Warwick Soldier To Be Buried At West Point

Credit wikipedia commons

WARWICK – A Warwick native, who was killed in Afghanistan last weekend, will be laid to rest at the West Point Cemetery.

LTC Jaimie Leonard was 39 when she was shot and killed by enemy fire while serving in the US Army. A 1997 graduate of the USMA, she was based at Fort Drum.

She was in her third deployment to the region – once in Iraq and twice in Afghanistan, and was the recipient of numerous awards and medals including three Bronze Stars.

Leonard will be interred with full military honors on next Thursday, June 20.

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