african american

  All American Boys is a new novel from award-winning authors Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely.

In the book, two teens—one black, one white—grapple with the repercussions of a single violent act that leaves their school, their community, and, ultimately, the country bitterly divided by racial tension.


The skeletal remains of more than a dozen 18th-century African-American slaves unearthed in upstate New York a decade ago will be reburied.

  The new play Veils opens on Thursday at the Barrington Stage Company on the Boyd-Quinson Mainstage. This morning we meet the playwright, Tom Coash.

When Intisar, an African American Muslim student, arrives in Cairo for a year abroad, she hopes finally to be understood. She’s quickly enlisted by her liberal Egyptian roommate to help create a controversial blog debating the practice of wearing veils. Soon mounting political unrest threatens their new-found friendship.

Playwright, director, and dramaturg Tom Coash spent four years teaching playwriting at The American University in Cairo, Egypt. He was a Co-founder of the Offstage Theatre in Charlottesville, VA and has worked for such theaters as the Manhattan Theatre Club, Stageworks/Hudson, and Actors Theatre of Louisville.

  When Damon Tweedy began medical school, he envisioned a bright future where his segregated, working-class background would become largely irrelevant.

Instead, he found that he had joined a new world where race is front and center. Black Man in a White Coat examines the complex ways in which both black doctors and patients must navigate the difficult and often contradictory terrain of race and medicine. As Tweedy transforms from student to practicing physician, he discovers how often race influences his encounters with patients.

Albany is celebrating Women’s History Month this evening at City Hall - the public is invited.

Speakers will gather in the rotunda of Albany City Hall - Nathaalie Carey, is President of the Albany, New York Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.   "Tonight the leaders of all African-American sororities will be discussing our history, our legacy and our future, in addition to the work that we do right here in the Capital Region."

Soul Food Love

Mar 13, 2015

  In May 2012, bestselling author Alice Randall penned an op-ed in the New York Times titled “Black Women and Fat,” chronicling her quest to be “the last fat black woman” in her family. She turned to her daughter, Caroline Randall Williams, for help.

Together they overhauled the way they cook and eat, translating recipes and traditions handed down by generations of black women into easy, affordable, and healthful—yet still indulgent—dishes, such as Peanut Chicken Stew, Red Bean and Brown Rice Creole Salad, Fiery Green Beans, and Sinless Sweet Potato Pie.

Their new book: Soul Food Love relates the authors’ fascinating family history, explores the often fraught relationship African-American women have had with food, and looks to reinvent the idea of Soul Food.

  Civil Rights activist and professor, Colia Clark, will be the keynote speaker of the 16th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Labor Celebration "Step Up - Take Back the Dream" on Monday, January 19th at the William S. Hackett Middle School in Albany, NY at 12:30pm.

Former College of St. Rose, SUNY Albany, and Union College adjunct professor, Colia Clark is a Mississippi native who was involved in the Civil Rights movement in her high school and college years. She was a special assistant for slain NAACP leader Medgar Evers during the time of his 1963 assassination.

  As an organizer, writer, publisher, scholar-activist, and elected official, Barbara Smith has played key roles in multiple social justice movements, including Civil Rights, feminism, lesbian and gay liberation, anti-racism, and Black feminism.

Her four decades of grassroots activism forged collaborations that introduced the idea that oppression must be fought on a variety of fronts simultaneously, including gender, race, class, and sexuality.

By combining hard-to-find historical documents with new unpublished interviews with fellow activists, her new book, Ain't Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around, uncovers the deep roots of today’s “identity politics” and “intersectionality” and serves as a primer for practicing solidarity and resistance.

    Walter Mosley is the author of more than 43 books, most notably 13 Easy Rawlins mysteries.

His latest, Rose Gold, continues Mosley’s ongoing and unique achievement in combining the mystery/PI genre with a rich social history of post war Los Angeles.

  Mississippi Eyes chronicles the events and the powerful witness of five young photographers in The Southern Documentary Project, working during the pivotal summer of 1964 in the segregated South. Together they captured the sometimes violent, sometimes miraculous process of social change as segregation resisted then gave way to a new beginning toward social justice.