african american history

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Wed October 1, 2014

'Brown Girl Dreaming' By Jaqueline Woodson

    

  Raised in South Carolina and New York, Jaqueline Woodson always felt halfway home in each place.

In Brown Girl Dreaming she uses vivid poems to share what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Wed September 24, 2014

Slavery And The Making Of American Capitalism

  Historian Edward Baptist reveals in The Half Has Never Been Told that slavery and its expansion were central to the evolution and modernization of our nation in the 18th and 19th centuries, catapulting the US into a modern, industrial and capitalist economy. 

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Capital Region News
12:14 pm
Sat June 21, 2014

Albany Celebrates Juneteenth

Credit The African American Cultural Center of the Capital Region

This weekend marks the 10th Annual Albany Juneteenth Celebration. The free community event is planned for Sunday, in Washington Park.

Although the Emancipation Proclamation called for the liberation of Confederate slaves on Jan. 1, 1863, its effects weren't immediate.  Two and a half years later, the emancipation took effect—when the Union army rode into Galveston to enforce President Lincoln's executive order.

Juneteenth has been sporadically celebrated in the South as a black independence day ever since June 1865, when slaves in Texas learned of their freedom.

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The Roundtable
10:35 am
Fri May 16, 2014

Ideas Matter - MASS Humanities - Reading Frederick Douglass

  We are very happy to continue our weekly feature on The Roundtable entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

Today we’ll speak with MASS Humanites about their Reading Frederick Douglass project.

We welcome Pleun Bouricius, Director of Grants and Programs, Mass Humanities and David Harris, Managing Director of the Charles Hamilton Houseton Institute for Race and Equality at Harvard Law School.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Tue April 8, 2014

The Underground Railroad History Project of the Capital Region's Conference

    

  This Friday, Saturday, and Sunday (April 11 – 13), The Underground Railroad History Project of the Capital Region will present their 13th Public History Conference. This year’s conference is entitled Slavery and the Underground Railroad: the Larger Context, the Lingering Legacy and is co-sponsored by Russell Sage College, The Department of History and Society at Russell Sage College, and the Rensselaer County Historical Society.

Here now to tell us all about it are Brea Barthel, a co-coordinator of the Conference, and Professor at SUNY Albany and RPI and Paul Stewart, Scholar in Residence at Russell Sage College and co-founder of the Underground Railroad History Project of the Capital Region.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Thu April 3, 2014

"Stokely: A Life" By Peniel E. Joseph

    

  Stokely Carmichael, the charismatic and controversial black activist, stepped onto the pages of history when he called for “Black Power” during a speech one Mississippi night in 1966.

A firebrand who straddled both the American civil rights and Black Power movements, Carmichael would stand for the rest of his life at the center of the storm he had unleashed that night.

In Stokely, preeminent civil rights scholar Peniel E. Joseph presents a groundbreaking biography of Carmichael, using his life as a prism through which to view the transformative African American freedom struggles of the twentieth century.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Fri March 7, 2014

Ideas Matter: Anne Northup, Slavery, and the Birth of American Cuisine

    This morning in our Ideas Matter segment, we spotlight New York Humanities and discuss Anne Northup, Slavery, and the Birth of American Cuisine.

12 Years a Slave, which just won the Oscar for Best Picture, tells the story of Solomon Northup who was kidnapped from upstate New York and sold into slavery. Told from his point of view, the movie doesn't tell what happened to his family while he was gone. This week we'll learn about his wife Anne, who worked as a cook at the Morris-Jumel House in New York City.

Our guests are: Carol Ward, Executive Director of Morris-Jumel House and Emilie Gruchow, Archivist at Morris-Jumel House.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Fri February 21, 2014

Ideas Matter: Freedom Riders

    

  Last week in our Ideas Matter segment we learned about an exciting national program, Created Equal, which uses documentary films to encourage public conversations about the changing meanings of freedom and equality in America. This week, we learn about how one local organization is using these films to discuss these ideas in the Capital Region.

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Capital Region News
11:31 am
Mon February 3, 2014

Black History Month Begins

At the Martin Luther King Memorial in Albany: Congressman Paul Tonko, Mayor Kathy Sheehan and County Executive Dan McCoy. (January 2014)
Credit WAMC Photo by Dave Lucas

Black History Month is here, with a full calendar of events throughout February. Capital Region Bureau Chief Dave Lucas  previews some of the first in the region.

At this hour in Albany at the County Office Building, the start of African American History Month is being promoted as "an important time to look back and reflect on the advancements made in equality here in Albany County as well as the nation as a whole."

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The Roundtable
10:10 am
Thu January 9, 2014

"Cutting Along The Color Line" By Quincy T. Mills

   Today, black-owned barbershops play a central role in African American public life. The intimacy of commercial grooming encourages both confidentiality and camaraderie, which make the barber shop an important gathering place for African American men to talk freely.

But for many years preceding and even after the Civil War, black barbers endured a measure of social stigma for perpetuating inequality: though the profession offered economic mobility to black entrepreneurs, black barbers were obliged by custom to serve an exclusively white clientele.

In his book, Cutting Along the Color Line, Vassar History Professor Quincy Mills chronicles the cultural history of black barber shops as businesses and civic institutions.

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