Albany Law School

Alicia Ouellette, president and dean of Albany Law School, signs agreement with James K. Reed, M.D., president & CEO of SPHP.
SPHP

St. Peter's Health Partners and Albany Law School have partnered to help seriously ill patients who need legal assistance.

  In his new book - Unfit for Democracy – WAMC Commentator and Albany Law Professor Stephen Gottlieb takes a critical look at the decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Roberts, asserting that the interpretation of constitutional law should be applied with a focus on preserving the system of government put in place by our founding fathers.

He joins us this morning to discuss Unfit for Democracy and preview his hour-long conversation tomorrow at Albany Law School with Alan Chartock beginning at 1PM at the Law School’s Dean Alexander Moot Courtroom. That sit-down will be aired at a later date here on WAMC and will take place in front of a live audience and is open to the public.

Prof. Gottlieb, Albany Law School's Jay and Ruth Caplan Distinguished Professor of Law, is the author of Morality Imposed: The Rehnquist Court and the State of Liberty in America he is also an expert on the Supreme Court, constitutional theory and election campaign law.

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University at Albany President Robert Jones this week delivered his State of the University Address. President since 2013, Jones says the university must turn around enrollment, which has lagged in recent years, setting a goal of 20,000 students by 2020. Jones spoke with WAMC's Capital Region Bureau Chief Dave Lucas.

WAMC Photo by Dave Lucas

The University at Albany and Albany Law School have announced a deeper affiliation that officials say creates important new academic opportunities for students, novel research and grant prospects for faculty, and advances the region’s role as a leader in higher education and innovation.

Sean Collins

Efforts to curb gun violence in Albany had another airing at an Albany Law School forum Wednesday night.

This post has been updated to reflect a correction: Kelly has been on vacation since after the debate, not hiatus, as originally reported.

You might know that Fox News personality Megyn Kelly has been off the air since shortly after her faceoff with Donald Trump during the first televised presidential debate leading up to 2016. What you may not know is that Kelly grew up in Delmar and graduated from Albany Law School.

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Immigrants in the U.S, both documented and undocumented, often face a number of challenges after they arrive from their homelands, and many of those problems need a lawyer. The Albany Law School has announced that beginning in the fall semester, students will be involved in a new immigration law clinic. Associate professor of law Sarah Rogerson is the director of the clinic.

WAMC Photo by Dave Lucas

In February 2014, Albany Mayor Kathy Sheehan, Saratoga Springs Mayor Joanne Yepsen and Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren — then, all new officeholders — participated  in an Albany Law School forum called  “Leading a New Era in City Government: Women Mayors of Upstate New York.” 

A lot can happen in one year's time.  The three Democrats were voted into office during a time when women in politics were making gains nationally.  Each has her own unique governing style: each had a picture of what the year ahead might bring. Each reflects on what was hoped for versus what happened.

Alicia Ouellette
Albany Law School

Alicia Ouellette earned a law degree in 1994 from Albany Law School, and then began a career that included private practice, a stint as a Court of Appeals clerk and as Assistant Solicitor General in the New York Attorney General’s Office.

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Albany Law School Professor Robert Heverly recently filed an amicus brief in the Supreme Court case Department of Homeland Security vs. MacLean on behalf of advocacy organization FlyersRights.org

As part of the case, the court will decide if a U.S. air marshal can be protected under the Whistle Blower Protection act after sharing information about the service to the press.

There’s a change atop Albany Law School.

The President and Dean of Albany Law School is stepping down. Penny Andrews made the announcement Tuesday; she'll stay on through the end of the 2014-15 school year and is expected to aid in the strategic plan for the college's future. Andrews did not elaborate. Professor Alicia Ouellette, former associate dean for Academic Affairs and Intellectual Life, will serve as the interim dean.

Albany Law School has taken the wraps off what it calls an "Innovative Strategic Plan to Prepare the Next Generation of Lawyers and Leaders" - WAMC's Capital Region Bureau Chief Dave Lucas sat down with school president and dean Penelope Andrews.

From the official press release:

'Game Of Drones' Preview

Mar 13, 2014
WAMC Photo by Dave Lucas

Next week, law professors, practicing attorneys and other experts will gather in Albany to discuss the use of drones, running the gamut from targeted killing to domestic drone use to drone journalism. 

Public Domain/Wikimedia Commons

Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, in partnership with Albany Law School, have implemented a 100% tobacco-free campus policy, now in place. A Tobacco-Free Kickoff Event was held tuesday in front of the ACPHS Student Center. Officials hail the move as a "notable step" toward a healthier and cleaner environment.

In today’s Academic Minute, Professor Timothy Lytton of Albany Law School reveals how stringent self-regulation has allowed the kosher food industry to thrive over the past century.

Timothy Lytton is the Albert and Angela Farone Distinguished Professor of Law at Albany Law School where he teaches courses on administrative law, the philosophy of law, and regulatory law. His latest publication is Kosher: Private Regulation in the Age of Industrial Food. He earned his law degree at Yale Law School.

Penny Andrews
Courtesy Albany Law School

South African anti-apartheid hero Nelson Mandela has now spent a month in the hospital.

As visitors from around the world share an outpouring of love and support for South Africa’s first democratically elected president, there has also been a question of what his legacy will mean for both South Africa and the world.

Albany Law School Dean Penelope "Penny" Andrews grew up and began studying law in apartheid South Africa before coming to the U.S. in the 1980’s.

Stephen Gottlieb: The Environmental Action Agenda

May 21, 2013

A few months ago, both Steve Leibo and I brought attention to an MIT study that suggested that a carbon tax could be a win-win-win solution. It would meet some Republican and some Democratic objectives, by allowing Congress to keep income taxes low, allow the Bush tax cuts to remain, yet fund Democratic social policies, all the while reducing our use and dependence on carbon based energy, which is destroying the environment, and is likely to leave an uninhabitable earth for our grandchildren.

    The $12-billion-a-year kosher food industry is the subject of Albany Law School Professor Timothy Lytton’s latest book, Kosher: Private Regulation in the Age of Industrial Food .

Professor Lytton examines the kosher industry as a model of private sector regulation in the midst of growing public concern over the government’s ability to regulate the food industry.

In today’s Academic Minute, Professor Robert Heverly of Albany Law School explores the legal implications surrounding differing definitions of the Internet.

Robert Heverly is an assistant professor of law at Albany Law School. His teaching and research interests include property and land use law, intellectual property and copyright law, and cyberspace and communications law.  He is also a fellow with the Information Society Project at Yale Law School, where he retains an affiliation as a faculty fellow. He earned his J.D. at Albany Law School.

Albany Law School President and Dean Penelope Andrews is the author of the new book From Cape Town to Kabul: Rethinking Strategies for Pursuing Women’s Human Rights, which advances a new approach to pursuing human rights for women in developing democracies.

This morning, the U.S. Supreme Court announced their majority decision to uphold most of the provisions of President Barack Obama’s landmark health care reform policy, including the mandate that all citizens purchase health insurance.

What does this ruling mean for the health, economy, and presidential politics of the country?