american history

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Thu September 11, 2014

'Band Of Giants: The Amateur Soldiers Who Won America's Independence' By Jack Kelly

    Band of Giants brings to life the founders who fought for our independence in the Revolutionary War. Jefferson, Adams, and Franklin are known to all; men like Morgan, Greene, and Wayne are less familiar. Yet the dreams of the politicians and theorists only became real because fighting men were willing to take on the grim, risky, brutal work of war.

We know Fort Knox, but what about Henry Knox, the burly Boston bookseller who took over the American artillery at the age of 25? Eighteen counties in the United States commemorate Richard Montgomery, but do we know that this revered martyr launched a full-scale invasion of Canada?

The soldiers of the American Revolution were a diverse lot: merchants and mechanics, farmers and fishermen, paragons and drunkards. Most were ardent amateurs. And journalist, novelist and historian Jack Kelly tells their story in Band of Giants.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Wed September 10, 2014

'The Bully Pulpit' By Doris Kearns Goodwin

  Doris Kearns Goodwin—the bestselling, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of No Ordinary Time and Team of Rivals—brings her blend of scholarship, intellectual rigor and riveting storytelling to the turbulent and fateful relationship between two presidents, the rise of muckraking journalism, and the far-reaching ferment of the Progressive Era.

Her best-selling book The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism is out this week in paperback.

Read more
WAMC Programs
3:06 pm
Tue September 9, 2014

The Book Show #1364 - Simon Winchester

      Simon Winchester, The New York Times bestselling author of Atlanticand The Professor and the Madman delivers his first book about America.

The Men Who United the States is a fascinating history that illuminates the men who toiled to discover, connect, and bond the citizenry and geography of The United States of America.

Read more
New England News
12:20 pm
Mon September 8, 2014

Magna Carta And Its 'Grandchildren' Take Over The Clark

One of four remaining copies of the original Magna Carta, sealed in 1215, is on display at The Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Mass., surrounded by influential documents in American history.
Credit Jim Levulis / WAMC

One of four remaining copies of the original Magna Carta is on display at The Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts, surrounded by influential documents in American history.

Read more
The Roundtable
10:10 am
Wed September 3, 2014

'Wilson' By A. Scott Berg

  Scott Berg, the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award winning author of Lindbergh, Kate Remembered, Max Perkins: Editor of Genius, and Goldwyn, received remarkable acclaim this past year for Wilson, his first book published in more than ten years.

Wilson is a biography of Berg’s boyhood hero Woodrow Wilson, the enormously important and influential but enigmatic and often mischaracterized twenty-eighth President of the United States. 

Read more
The Roundtable
11:35 am
Tue September 2, 2014

'Gruesome Spectacles: Botched Executions And America's Death Penalty' By Austin Sarat

  Renewed and vigorous debate over the death penalty has erupted as DNA testing has proven that many on death row are in fact innocent. In this debate, however, the guilty have been forgotten. In his new book, Gruesome Spectacles: Botched Executions and America's Death Penalty, legal scholar Austin Sarat describes just how unquiet death by execution can be. If we assume a death row prisoner is guilty, how can we be sure that we are fulfilling the Supreme Court's mandate to ensure that his execution is "the mere extinguishment of life" and not a cruel and unusual punishment?

Read more
The Roundtable
10:35 am
Tue September 2, 2014

'The Port Chicago 50' By Steve Sheinkin

  On July 17, 1944, a massive explosion rocked the segregated Navy base at Port Chicago, California, killing more than 300 sailors who were at the docks, critically injuring off-duty men in their bunks, and shattering windows up to a mile away.

On August 9th, 244 men refused to go back to work until unsafe and unfair conditions at the docks were addressed. When the dust settled, fifty were charged with mutiny, facing decades in jail and even execution.

Read more
The Roundtable
11:35 am
Wed August 6, 2014

'Mississippi Eyes' And The Southern Documentary Project

  Mississippi Eyes chronicles the events and the powerful witness of five young photographers in The Southern Documentary Project, working during the pivotal summer of 1964 in the segregated South. Together they captured the sometimes violent, sometimes miraculous process of social change as segregation resisted then gave way to a new beginning toward social justice.

Read more
The Roundtable
10:35 am
Mon August 4, 2014

'The Greatest Comeback: How Richard Nixon Rose From Defeat To Create The New Majority'

    After suffering stinging defeats in the 1960 presidential election against John F. Kennedy, and in the 1962 California gubernatorial election, Nixon's career was declared dead by Washington press and politicians alike. Yet on January 20, 1969, just six years after he had said his political life was over, Nixon would stand taking the oath of office as 37th President of the United States. How did Richard Nixon resurrect a ruined career and reunite a shattered and fractured Republican Party to capture the White House?

In his new book, The Greatest Comeback: How Richard Nixon Rose from Defeat to Create the New Majority, Pat Buchanan offers an insider account of one of the most remarkable American political stories of the 20th century.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Mon August 4, 2014

'The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It' By John Dean

  Published to coincide with the 40th anniversary of Richard Nixon’s resignation from office, New York Times bestselling author John Dean, a key player in the Nixon administration, divulges the full and complete story of Nixon’s role in Watergate.

Based on Nixon’s never-before-released secret White House recordings, The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It looks to connect the dots between the perceived understanding of Watergate and what actually happened.

John Dean was legal counsel to President Nixon during the Watergate scandal, and his Sen­ate testimony lead to Nixon’s resignation.

Pages