american history

The Roundtable
9:35 am
Wed November 14, 2012

Lincoln screenwriter, Tony Kushner

In a nation divided by war and the strong winds of change, Lincoln pursues a course of action designed to end the war, unite the country and abolish slavery. The film’s screenplay comes from Tony and Pulitzer Prize Award Winner – Tony Kushner (Angels in America).

Tony Kushner will be a featured speaker at the next Speakers at Temple Emanuel Series on Sunday, November 18.

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The Roundtable
9:09 am
Wed November 14, 2012

Question of the Day - Lincoln?

Steven Spielberg directs two-time Academy Award winner Daniel Day-Lewis in “Lincoln,” a drama that focuses on the 16th President’s tumultuous final months in office. The movie opens nationwide on Friday and we will focus on Lincoln – the man and the movie on today’s Roundtable.

Our Question of the Day: What do you take from the legacy of Abraham Lincoln?

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Mon November 12, 2012

The Oath by Jeffrey Toobin

Jeffrey Toobin joins us to discuss The Oath: The Obama White House and the Supreme Court.

He and Joe Donahue have a longer discussion of the book in a Northshire Bookstore Off the Shelf event with a live Book Show taping on 11/17.

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The Roundtable
10:35 am
Wed November 7, 2012

Citizen Soldier: A Life of Harry S. Truman by Aida Donald

When Harry S. Truman left the White House in 1953, his reputation was in ruins. In Citizen Soldier: A Life of Harry S. Truman, Aida Donald shows that, for all his failings, Truman deserves recognition as the principal architect of the American postwar world.

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The Roundtable
10:10 am
Wed November 7, 2012

The First Step to Freedom: Abraham Lincoln’s Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation

Credit http://www.nysm.nysed.gov/ep/proclamation/

The preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, a document that put in motion the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments of the U.S. Constitution, will have a temporary home in the New York State Capital for two days.

The four-page draft of the document, handwritten by Abraham Lincoln, will be on display at the New York State Museum. The exhibition offers an unprecedented display of the only surviving version of the document in Lincoln’s handwriting and includes historical background and interpretation of the document.

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The Roundtable
9:35 am
Fri November 2, 2012

The Partisan: The Life of William Rehnquist by John Jenkins

John A. Jenkins joins us to discuss his book, The Partisan: The Life of William Rehnquist.

John A. Jenkins is president and publisher of CQ Press. He is a four-time recipient of the American Bar Association’s Gavel Award Certificate of Merit, the highest award in legal journalism.

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The Roundtable
11:35 am
Thu November 1, 2012

American's Unwritten Constitution

We speak with Akhil Reed Amar about his new book, America's Unwritten Constitution: The Precedents and Principles We Live By.

Akhil Reed Amar is Sterling Professor of Law and Political Science at Yale University, and periodically serves as a visiting professor at Harvard, Columbia, and Pepperdine Law Schools.

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The Roundtable
9:35 am
Fri September 21, 2012

The Good Girls Revolt: How the Women of Newsweek Sued their Bosses and Changed the Workplace

In the 1960s, Lynn Povich worked at Newsweek — where she became part of a revolution. At that time, women were hired to deliver mail, clip newspapers, and, if they were lucky, became researchers or fact checkers. All of the writers and reporters were men.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Thu September 20, 2012

Just Plain Dick by Kevin Mattson

It all started with some businessmen bankrolling Richard Nixon to become a "salesman against socialization." But in this precursor to current campaign finance scandals, Nixon had some explaining to do to keep his place on Eisenhower’s Republican ticket, so he took to the airwaves.

In making his speech, Nixon left behind lines about a "Republican cloth coat" and a black and white cocker spaniel named "Checkers." The speech saved and bolstered Nixon’s political career and set the tone for the 1952 campaign.

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The Roundtable
11:35 am
Wed September 19, 2012

Thomas Jefferson's Creme Brulee

In 1784, Thomas Jefferson struck a deal with one of his slaves, 19-year-old James Hemings. The founding Father was traveling to Paris and wanted to bring James along “for a particular purpose” – to master the art of French cooking.

In exchange for James’s cooperation, Jefferson would grant his freedom. Thus began one of the strangest partnerships in U.S. history. As James apprenticed under master French chefs, Jefferson studied the cultivation of French crops (especially grapes for winemaking) so they might be replicated in American agriculture.

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