american history

The Roundtable
11:45 am
Fri November 1, 2013

"If Kennedy Lived" By Jeff Greenfield

    As the 50th Anniversary of JFK’s murder in Dallas approaches, readers interested both in Kennedy’s life and circumstances of his death have dozens of new books to peruse.

Jeff Greenfield is the host of the PBS news show Need to Know, a Yahoo! News columnist, and a veteran of CBS News, ABC News, and CNN. A five-time Emmy Award winner, he is the author of twelve books.

In his book, If Kennedy Lived: The First and Second Terms of President John F. Kennedy: An Alternate History, Greenfield explores what would happen to JFK's life, presidency, country, world if he hadn't died on November 22, 1963.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Tue October 29, 2013

"Young Mr. Roosevelt" By Stanley Weintraub

    In Young Mr. Roosevelt, acclaimed historian Stanley Weintraub evokes Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s political and wartime beginnings. An unpromising patrician playboy appointed assistant secretary of the Navy in 1913, Roosevelt learned quickly and rose to national visibility in World War I.

Democratic vice-presidential nominee in 1920, he lost the election but not his ambitions. While his stature was rising, his testy marriage to his cousin Eleanor was fraying amid scandal quietly covered up. Even polio a year later would not suppress his inevitable ascent.

Stanley Weintraub will talk about his new book at the FDR Presidential Library and Museum on Sunday, November 3 at 2pm.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Tue October 22, 2013

"Brigham Young: A Concise Biography of the Mormon Moses" by Ed Breslin

In the new book Brigham Young: A Concise Biography of the Mormon Moses, author Ed Breslin examines Young’s life using a scholarly focus with a sense of measured admiration, but he doesn’t gloss over the darker aspects such as Young’s role in the Mountain Meadows Massacre.

Breslin left his job as publisher and senior vice president of HarperCollins to be a full-time writer after more than two decades in publishing, and has co-written biographies of William Tecumseh Sherman and George S. Patton. In 2008, he collaborated on Sen. Mel Martinez’s memoir, A Sense of Belonging.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Tue October 15, 2013

"Miss Anne In Harlem: The White Women Of The Black Renaissance" By Carla Kaplan

    Ten years ago, literary scholar Carla Kaplan released an acclaimed edition of the letters of Zora Neale Hurston.

In the course of researching Hurston's life, Kaplan became curious about the white women who were in Harlem in the same period as Hurston, women who risked family exile and social ostracism to be part of the artistic and political movements of the Harlem Renaissance.

Now, Kaplan has published a cultural history of those women called Miss Anne in Harlem: The White Women of the Black Renaissance. Carla Kaplan is an award-winning professor and writer who holds the Stanton and Elisabeth Davis Distinguished Professorship in American Literature at Northeastern University. She will be speaking at Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley tomorrow night.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Tue September 10, 2013

"Wilson" By A. Scott Berg

    One hundred years after his inauguration, Woodrow Wilson still stands as one of the most influential figures of the twentieth century, and one of the most enigmatic. 

And now, after more than a decade of research and writing, Pulitzer Prize-winning author A. Scott Berg has completed Wilson--the most personal and penetrating biography ever written about the 28th President.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Wed September 4, 2013

"Hammarskjöld: A Life" By Roger Lipsey

    After his mysterious death, Dag Hammarskjöld was described by John F. Kennedy as the "greatest statesman of our century." The second secretary-general of the United Nations, he is the only person to have been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize posthumously.

Through extensive research in little explored archives and personal correspondence, Roger Lipsey has written a massive biography of Dag Hammarskjöld. Hammarskjöld: A Life provides vivid new insights into Hammarskjöld’s life.

Roger Lipsey is an author, art historian, editor, and translator and has written on a wide range of topics and intellectual figures.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Wed August 28, 2013

Rep. John Lewis - "Across That Bridge"

  We speak with United States Congressman, John Lewis, about his new book, Across That Bridge: Life Lessons and a Vision for Change.

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The Roundtable
11:12 am
Thu August 15, 2013

"America’s Obsessives" by Joshua Kendall

    

  In this segment we explore the compulsive energy that built a nation. Joshua Kendall puts many American icons on the psychologist's couch in America’s Obsessives.

In this fascinating look at the arc of American history through the lens of compulsive behavior, he shows how some of our nation's greatest achievements-from the Declaration of Independence to the invention of the iPhone-have roots in the disappointments and frustrations of early childhood.

Starting with the obsessive natures of some of Silicon Valley's titans, including Steve Jobs, Kendall moves on to profile seven iconic figures, such as founding father Thomas Jefferson, licentious librarian Melvil Dewey, condiment kingpin H. J. Heinz, slugger Ted Williams, and Estee Lauder.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Mon August 5, 2013

"Our Lives, Our Fortunes and Our Sacred Honor" by Richard Beeman

    

  In Our Lives, Our Fortunes and Our Sacred Honor, acclaimed historian Richard R. Beeman examines the grueling twenty-two-month period between the meeting of the Continental Congress on September 5, 1774 and the audacious decision for independence in July of 1776.

As late as 1774, American independence was hardly inevitable—indeed, most Americans found it neither desirable nor likely.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Ulysses S. Grant Cottage State Historic Site

   The Ulysses S. Grant Cottage State Historic Site is a hidden treasure in the foothills of the Adirondacks. It sits on top of Mt. McGregor and overlooks the Adirondack Mountains to the north, the Green Mountains to the east, and the Catskills to the south.

The view is breathtaking and was the last view of our area that General Ulysses S. Grant saw before his death in this historic cottage. The Cottage has remained virtually unchanged since 1885 and still houses the bed on which he died and the funeral arrangements are still intact.

The clock on the mantle still remains where his son, Fred, stopped the hands at 8:08 a.m. on July 23, 1885 when his father passed away – 128 years ago yesterday. Tim Welch – President of the Grant Cottage Historic Site and Steve Trimm, the site’s Grant Impersonator, join us in studio A this morning.

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