american history

The Roundtable
9:20 am
Mon July 1, 2013

FDR Presidential Library and Museum - Lynn Bassanese and Herman Eberhardt

FDR's Fireside Chat microphone

    While the renovation of the museum is an amazing achievement, it is important to realize the revitalization also includes new and exciting permanent museum exhibits.

These exhibits tell the story of the Roosevelt Presidency beginning in the depths of the Great Depression and continuing through the New Deal and WWII with an emphasis on both Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt’s relationship with the American people.

Lynn Bassanese, Director of the FDR Presidential Library and Museum and Museum Curator, Herman Eberhardt join us.

The Roundtable
9:10 am
Mon July 1, 2013

FDR Presidential Library and Museum - Lynn Bassanese

    Lynn Bassanese began working at FDR Presidential Library and Museum as part-time archives aides in 1972 while a student at nearby Marist College. She is now the director of the library and museum and has largely overseen this $35 million, nine-year restoration and redesign project that we are celebrating this morning.

She was also front and center at yesterday’s rededication here at America’s first Presidential Library and the only one used by a sitting President.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Fri June 28, 2013

Ideas Matter: New York Council for the Humanities and The Civil War Sesquicentennial

  We are very happy to continue our new regular feature on The Roundtable, entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter. This morning we spotlight the Civil War sesquicentennial.

The New York Council for the Humanities offers reading and discussion programs about the Civil War and Lincoln's speeches.

David Carlyon is a writer and independent scholar. He has a Ph.D. in theater history from Northwestern University and was a clown with Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus.

The Roundtable
9:35 am
Wed June 26, 2013

"Gettysburg: The Last Invasion" by Allen C. Guelzo

    Of the half-dozen full-length histories of the battle of Gettysburg written over the last century, Gettysburg: The Last Invasion is the first to dive down so closely to the experience of the individual soldier, or looks so closely at the sway of politics over military decisions, or places the battle so firmly in the context of nineteenth-century military practice.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Wed May 29, 2013

"The Civil War in 50 Objects"

    In The Civil War in 50 Objects, Lincoln scholar Harold Holzer sheds new light on the war by examining fifty objects from the New-York Historical Society’s acclaimed collection. A daguerreotype of an elderly, dignified ex-slave, whose unblinking stare still mesmerizes; a soldier’s footlocker still packed with its contents; Grant’s handwritten terms of surrender at Appomattox—the stories these objects tell are rich, poignant, sometimes painful, and always fascinating. They illuminate the conflict from all perspectives—Union and Confederate, military and civilian, black and white, male and female—and give readers a deeply human sense of the war.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Wed May 29, 2013

"Through the Perilous Fight: Six Weeks That Saved the Nation" by Steve Vogel

    In his new book, Through the Perilous Fight: Six Weeks That Saved the Nation, veteran reporter Steve Vogel tells the gripping story of the burning of Washington and the improbable last stand at Baltimore that helped save the nation and inspired its National Anthem.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Mon May 20, 2013

History and Family at The Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum

    The Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park, New York is in the midst of their countdown to the public opening of the Roosevelt Library's new permanent museum exhibits on June 30th.

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The Roundtable
11:12 am
Thu May 16, 2013

"Ghosts of Jim Crow" by F. Michael Higginbotham

    When America inaugurated its first African American president, in 2009, many wondered if the country had finally become a "post-racial" society.

In Ghosts of Jim Crow, F. Michael Higginbotham argues that America remains far away from that imagined utopia.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Thu May 2, 2013

"Bunker Hill: A City, a Siege, a Revolution" by Nathaniel Philbrick

    Boston in 1775 is an island city occupied by British troops after a series of incendiary incidents by patriots who range from sober citizens to thuggish vigilantes. After the Boston Tea Party, British and American soldiers and Massachusetts residents have warily maneuvered around each other until April 19, when violence finally erupts at Lexington and Concord.

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The Roundtable
11:12 am
Mon April 22, 2013

Audiovisual Presentations at The Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum

  The Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park, New York is in the midst of their countdown to the public opening of the Roosevelt Library's new permanent museum exhibits on June 30th.

These exhibits will tell the story of the Roosevelt presidency beginning in the depths of the Great Depression and continuing through the New Deal years and World War II with an emphasis on both Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt’s relationship with the American people. Special inter-actives, immersive audio‐visual theaters, and rarely seen artifacts will convey the dramatic story of the Roosevelt era as the Roosevelt Library brings a New Deal to a New Generation.

To talk specifically about the upcoming audiovisual presentations, we welcome Herman Eberhardt, Supervisory Museum Curator for the Roosevelt Library and Steve Bressler, President of Monadnock Media.

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