american history

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Thu January 17, 2013

Uncle Al Capone

  Deirdre Marie Capone is Al Capone's grandniece and is author of the new memoir, Uncle Al Capone - The Untold Story from Inside His Family. The book is a portrait of the Capone family and its mob trade examines what it has meant to survive the storied legacy of the family's forebears.

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The Roundtable
11:35 am
Tue January 8, 2013

"The Eve of Destruction: How 1965 Transformed America"

At the beginning of 1965, the U.S. seemed on the cusp of a golden age. Although Americans had been shocked by the assassination in 1963 of President Kennedy, they exuded a sense of consensus and optimism that showed no signs of abating. Indeed, political liberalism and interracial civil rights activism made it appear as if 1965 would find America more progressive and unified than it had ever been before. In January 1965, President Lyndon Johnson proclaimed that the country had “no irreconcilable conflicts.”

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The Roundtable
10:35 am
Tue January 8, 2013

"The Last Runaway" by Tracy Chevalier

Bestselling author, Tracy Chevalier, is celebrated for her rich, beautiful novels spun around captivating European historical figures such as Johannes Vermeer, the Dutch painter featured in Chevalier’s tour-de-force blockbuster Girl with a Pearl Earring.

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The Roundtable
9:35 am
Tue December 18, 2012

"Capturing Camelot: Stanley Tretick's Iconic Images of the Kennedys"

A consummate photojournalist, Stanley Tretick was sent by United Press International to follow the Kennedy campaign of 1960. The photographer soon befriended the candidate and took many of JFK's best pictures during this time. When Kennedy took office, Tretick was given extensive access to the White House, and the picture magazine Look hired him to cover the president and his family. Tretick is best known today for the photographs he took of President Kennedy relaxing with his children.

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The Roundtable
11:35 am
Wed December 12, 2012

Underground Railroad: Escape to Freedom

Underground Railroad: Escape to Freedom is a book + audio + boardgame for children. The book and audio were researched and recorded on location following routes of the UGRR.

With action and adventure as key elements, the experiential boardgame uses UGRR lore, nature signs, survival skills, and African-American spirituals (now known to be secret codes) to engage children in history, foster understanding, and sharpen critical thinking skills.

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The Roundtable
9:35 am
Mon December 10, 2012

"Jack Kennedy: Elusive Hero" by Chris Matthews

Chris Matthews is anchor of MSNBC's Hardball as well as the NBC-syndicated The Chris Matthews Show. He is an author of American; Now, Let Me Tell You What I Really Think; and Kennedy and Nixon. He joins us to speak about his latest book, Jack Kennedy: Elusive Hero.

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The Roundtable
11:12 am
Thu December 6, 2012

"This Indian Country" by Frederick Hoxie

Frederick E. Hoxie, one of our most prominent and celebrated academic historians of Native American history, has written a book entitled, This Indian Country: American Indian Activists and the Place They Made, which creates a bold and sweeping counter-narrative to our conventional understanding of Native American history.

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The Roundtable
11:35 am
Thu November 29, 2012

"A Wicked War" by Amy S. Greenberg

Amy S. Greenberg is Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of History and Women's Studies at Penn State University. She is a leading scholar of Manifest Destiny and has held fellowships from the Huntington Library, the New-York Historical Society, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the American Philosophical Society.

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The Roundtable
9:35 am
Thu November 29, 2012

Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power by Jon Meacham

In Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power, Jon Meacham, the Pulitzer Prize–winning author of American Lion and Franklin and Winston, brings vividly to life an extraordinary man and his remarkable times.

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The Roundtable
10:35 am
Mon November 26, 2012

Writing with Scissors: American Scrapbooks from the Civil War to the Harlem Renaissance

According to our next guest, men and women 150 years ago grappled with information overload by making scrapbooks - the ancestors of Google and blogging. From Abraham Lincoln to Susan B. Anthony, African American janitors to farm-women, abolitionists to Confederates, people cut out and pasted down their reading.

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