american songbook

  The Philadelphia Orchestra will present Sophisticated Ladies on Saturday, August 13th at SPAC. The concert is a celebration of the groundbreaking icons of American popular song, from Ella Fitzgerald to Sarah Vaughan to Dinah Washington and of course, Billie Holiday. Montego Glover, Capathia Jenkins, and N'Kenge will join the orchestra to sing songs like "Strike Up the Band," "Stormy Weather," "Love is Here to Stay," and "Come Rain or Come Shine."<p>

Steven Reineke will conduct and he joins us to talk about the concert.

  Seth MacFarlane is the creative force behind TV's Family Guy, American Dad!, and The Cleveland Show. He was also the writer-director of the films Ted, its sequel Ted2, and A Million Ways to Die in the West.

He has also released three successful albums of standards including Music is Better than Words and No One Ever Tells You. MacFarlane's voice has been celebrated for its perfect phrasing, richness, and consistency. He has been nominated for 4 Grammys. 

He has played to sold out audiences as London's Royal Albert Hall, New York's Carnegie Hall, and Symphony Hall in Boston. He will be back with The Boston Pops this Sunday at 2:30pm in The Shed at Tanglewood

  The defining voice of the 20th century, Frank Sinatra enjoyed a legendary recording career that spanned six decades, beginning with his earliest session in 1939 and culminating with his last in 1993, for his world-renowned, multi-platinum Duets and Duets II albums.

Ultimate Sinatra presents key recordings spanning the Chairman of the Board's sessions for Columbia, Capitol and Reprise. A new collection, Ultimate Sinatra opens with 'All Or Nothing At All,' recorded with Harry James and his Orchestra on August 31, 1939 during Sinatra's first studio session.

We welcome Frank's youngest daughter, Tina, to the show to discuss her father and this new collection.

  Sinatra’s Century is a collection of one-hundred short reflections on the man, his music, and his larger-than-life story, by a lifetime fan who also happens to be one of the poetry world’s most prominent voices.

David Lehman uses each of these short pieces to look back on a single facet of the entertainer’s story—from his childhood in Hoboken, to his emergence as “The Voice” in the 1940s, to the wild professional (and romantic) fluctuations that followed. Lehman offers new insights and revisits familiar stories—Sinatra’s dramatic love affairs with some of the most beautiful stars in Hollywood; his fall from grace in the late 1940s and resurrection during the “Capitol Years” of the 1950s; his bonds with the rest of the Rat Pack; and his long tenure as the Chairman of the Board, viewed as the eminence grise of popular music inspiring generations of artists.

  Frankie Liked to Sing celebrates the life of Frank Sinatra, whose iconic voice changed popular music forever and influenced generations of listeners all over the world.

From his early days in Hoboken, New Jersey, to making it big in New York City, Sinatra was determined to follow his dream of being a singer and moving people with his voice. And now, one hundred years after his birth, his legacy lives on with this spirited and loving tribute by John Seven and Jana Christy.

  In 2010's Frank: The Voice, James Kaplan, in rich, distinctive, compulsively readable prose, told the story of Frank Sinatra's meteoric rise to fame, subsequent failures, and reinvention as a star of live performance and screen.

The story of "Ol' Blue Eyes" continues with Sinatra: The Chairman, picking up the day after Frank claimed his Academy Award in 1954 and had reestablished himself as the top recording artist in music.

Frank's life post-Oscar was incredibly dense: in between recording albums and singles, he often shot four or five movies a year; did TV show and nightclub appearances; started his own label, Reprise; and juggled his considerable commercial ventures (movie production, the restaurant business, even prizefighter management) alongside his famous and sometimes notorious social activities and commitments.

  In honor of Sinatra's 100th birthday we speak with Pete Hamill about his classic tribute, Why Sinatra Matters

In this unique homage to an American icon, journalist and award-winning author Pete Hamill evokes the essence of Sinatra--examining his art and his legend from the inside, as only a friend of many years could do.

Shaped by Prohibition, the Depression, and war, Francis Albert Sinatra became the troubadour of urban loneliness. With his songs, he enabled millions of others to tell their own stories, providing an entire generation with a sense of tradition and pride belonging distinctly to them.

    Everybody knows and loves the American Songbook. But it’s a bit less widely understood that in about 1950, this stream of great songs more or less dried up. All of a sudden, what came over the radio wasn’t Gershwin, Porter, and Berlin, but “Come on-a My House” and “How Much Is That Doggie in the Window?” Elvis and rock and roll arrived a few years later, and at that point the game was truly up.

What happened, and why?

In The B Side: The Death of Tin Pan Alley and the Rebirth of the Great American Song, acclaimed cultural historian Ben Yagoda answers those questions in a fascinating piece of detective work.

    With his unique, pitch-perfect voice still going strong after more than seven decades in the business, Tony Bennett is in a class by himself. He's the winner of 17 Grammy Awards, the Grammy Lifetime Award and 7 Emmy Awards for his 2007 prime-time special, Tony Bennett: An American Classic.

Bennett delights his fans, both young and old, around the globe with timeless classics such as "Because of You," "Rags to Riches," and his signature song, "I Left My Heart in San Francisco."

He'll be performing at Tanglewood in Lenox, MA on Sunday, August 31st at 2:30pm.

    On August 6th The Philadelphia Orchestra will kick off their three week summer season at The Saratoga Performing Arts Center with The Great American Songbook.

Bramwell Tovey conducts an evening of music from the Gershwins, Bernstein, and Copland with vocal selections sung by Brian Stokes Mitchell.

    

  On Friday June 6th and Saturday June 7th – Albany Pro Musica will present “Pops Goes the Chorus” – two concerts of show tunes and popular songs at the Shaker Meeting House in Albany, NY.

The cabaret-style evening showcases APM’s individual and ensemble talents.

Local choir director and teaching artist Frank Leavitt will direct and emcee the Pro-Musica Pops shows and he joins us now to tell us more.

    In 1955, Johnny Mathis landed a job singing weekends at Ann Dee's 440 Club. George Avakian, then head of Jazz A&R at Columbia, came to the club, heard Mathis sing and sent the now famous telegram to his record company: "Have found phenomenal 19-year-old boy who could go all the way. Send blank contracts." Mathis made his first appearance on "The Ed Sullivan Show" in 1957, launching his career as a recording star and national celebrity.

Legendary crooner, Johnny "The Velvet Voice" Mathis, will perform at The Palace in Albany, New York tomorrow night at 8pm and in this interview we speak with him about his start, the support of people like Ella Fitzgerald, and how he feels about the term "crooner."

John Pizzarelli, the son of jazz guitar legend Bucky Pizzarelli, is a connoisseur of American song who grew up among the legends of jazz. His absorbing, upbeat, and down to earth new memoir, World on a String perfectly captures John's warm and funny tone as he tells the story of a musical life well lived.

This Saturday at 9pm, Tom Judson will perform “Nature Boy: Songs of Earth and Sky” as part of the Helsinki Hudson and Showstoppers New York series Helsinki on Broadway.