anti-fracking

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

When New York became the second state in the nation (after Vermont)  to ban the controversial gas drilling method hydraulic fracturing, some were surprised that Governor Andrew Cuomo finally took a stance on the issue.

The fracking announcement December 17th came after six years of a de facto moratorium with a long-awaited health impact study. New York State acting Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker, who said “I cannot support high volume hydraulic fracturing in the great state of New York.”

Blair Horner: The Governor Bans Fracking

Dec 22, 2014


The big news last week was the decision by the Cuomo Administration to prohibit the controversial high-volume hydraulic fracturing, or fracking.  Fracking is a technology that allows for drilling for oil and gas reserves that had been inaccessible until the development of this new technology.  Not surprisingly, large, industrial scale oil and gas drilling has serious environmental and public health implications.

NY Fracking Ban Decision Elicits Different Reactions

Dec 18, 2014

It will probably go down as the biggest decision of the year in New York State – a ban on fracking. Wednesday’s news came the same day casino license recommendations were announced. Supporters of a fracking ban are celebrating the long-awaited decision while opponents say they are disappointed and the Southern Tier, where fracking would have taken place, is doomed.

Capital District Against Fracking

  Environmentalists are celebrating after Governor Andrew Cuomo says there will be no hydrofracking in New York for now, citing inconclusive scientific evidence on the health effects of the gas drilling process.

  A reform group studied votes taken by local governments across the state on whether to allow hydro-fracking, and found numerous potential conflicts of interest that they say could have tainted the outcome of the votes.

The New York Public Interest Research Group studied 59 municipalities that have voted to permit hydro-fracking in the past few years, if New York State eventually approves the process.  They found numerous questionable activities, including local elected officials holding gas leases and town attorneys who also represented oil and gas companies.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Health professionals and scientists are out with two new independent summations of the risks and harms of shale gas development and hydraulic fracturing. The two documents were formally released Thursday at the Legislative Office Building in downtown Albany.

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Two Texas companies that drill for natural gas have signed agreements with New York's attorney general to release information about the financial risks to investors from hydraulic fracturing, a drilling method banned in the state while health officials study its effects.

Agreements with EOG Resources Inc. and Anadarko Petroleum Corp. require them to publicly disclose of risks from chemical handling, wastewater disposal, effects on drinking water aquifers, regulation and litigation.

A Time Warner Cable News/Siena College poll released late Wednesday showed 51 percent of voters in the Southern Tier and Hudson Valley oppose hydrofracking.

In survey after survey, New Yorkers have been 50-50 on the gas extraction process hydraulic fracturing, which is on hold under a de facto moratorium.

Dr. Sandra Steingraber, Ithaca College

A group of health care professionals are seeking a meeting with Governor Cuomo’s health department, saying they have compiled a compendium of new and on going research that highlights numerous health risks associated with hydro fracking.

Tim Hurst / Flickr

New York State continues wait for final word on hydraulic fracturing, the controversial gas drilling method on hold since 2008.  Monday's Court of Appeals decision upheld communities’ right to use traditional local zoning laws to keep fracking out of their borders.

The New York Court of Appeals ruling came in two cases decided jointly:  one brought by an oil company and the other a dairy farm that wanted to lease its land, challenging the towns of Dryden and Middlefield’s decisions to ban the industrial activity there.

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